Dr Kristyn Gorton

Profile

Biography

I first came to the University of York as an exchange student from Hamilton College in the US studying English Literature, so there was a real sense of coming full circle when I took up the position of Lecturer in the newly forming Department of Theatre, Film and Television in 2007. 

I started my graduate work at the University of Oxford (Trinity College), but was quickly disillusioned and then had a romantic idea to move to Scotland to study at the University of Edinburgh because the poet I was researching, Helen Maria Williams, was born and raised in Berwick Upon Tweed. I neglected to find out whether there was a suitable supervisor for my work and ended up switching my project to the concept of desire in psychoanalysis, modern literature and contemporary Art. My thesis was later revised into a monograph titled Psychoanalysis and the Portrayal of Desire in Twentieth-Century Fiction: A Feminist Critique (2006). My next book continued my interest in the concept of desire but extended the examples to include film, Theorising Desire: From Freud to Feminism to Film (2008). Writing about desire led to thinking about emotion and how we engage with what we watch on television, Media Audiences: Television, Meaning and Emotion (2009) and how these emotional encounters are theorised online, Emotion Online: Theorising Affect on the Internet (2012). My current book, Inheriting British Television: Memories, Archives and Industries (2017) focuses on how British television is remembered and by whom. It explores how viewers use television to think about their past and to share it with the next generation. 

I have worked as a script consultant with Kay Mellor on an adaptation of Fat Friends. The experience led to a greater understanding of the British television industry, and women’s role within it and the importance of engaging with the industry when doing academic research in television. 

 

Career

As highlighted in my biography, my work has moved from thinking about the concept of desire, to emotional engagements within film and television, to thinking about how memory functions within television history. I’m also interested in discourses on care and will soon be putting together a book on self-care, contemporary American culture and wellness. 

I have also written on Northern studies, looking specifically at Maxine Peake’s Northern Stardom and the representation of women in Sally Wainwright’s television drama. 

I’m currently working with colleagues on a grant proposal about women and ageing, which has been a long-term interest and research strand.

 

Supervision

I'm currently supervising projects on Scand-noir, neoliberalism and the self in contemporary television, Thai television, myth and adaptation in television and an ethnographic project on outdoor cinema.  I would be interested in supervising projects on television and emotion/affect; television and desire; new directions with feminist television criticism; online media and emotion; discourses on care and television memories.

 

Editorial duties

While working in the School of Cultural Studies at Leeds Beckett University, I established connections within the British television industry, which has helped to inform my research and teaching.  For instance, as part of a Public Lecture Series, I interviewed the British television writer and actress Kay Mellor.  This experience led to work as a script/dialogue consultant for Mellor's American adaptation of Fat Friends.

Working within the industry has enabled me to establish television contacts, particularly in the North of England with Rollem Productions and ITV and with the writers and producers of soap operas such as Emmerdale, Coronation Street,  and Fair City.

My work within the industry informs my commitment to the engagement between theory and practice.

Research

Overview

My research focuses on two overlapping areas: one strand considers the concept of desire and the ways in which it can be figured and understood in film, television and contemporary culture; while the second strand centres on the concepts of emotion and affect and examines the ways in which viewers become 'emotionally engaged' with what they watch.

I have published a monograph titled Theorising Desire: From Freud to Feminism to Film (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008) and have recently completed another book titled Media Audiences: Television, Meaning and Emotion, which will be published by Edinburgh University Press in September 2009.

I have contributed work on emotion, television and film and feminist theory to a wide range of journals such as The Journal of British Cinema and Television, Feminist Review, Studies in European Cinema, Critical Studies in Television, Feminist Theory, and Feminism and Psychology.

Projects

I have designed and taught a wide range of courses at all levels, and was responsible for developing the television strand of the BA in Media & Popular Culture at Leeds Metropolitan University. I have used my experience to establish the television provision for the BA in Writing, Directing & Performance and the MA in Cinema, Television & Society in the department.

Supervision

I currently supervise doctoral work on the re-making and adaptation of television texts, the endings of long-running serials and Thai soap operas. I would be interested in supervising projects on television and emotion; television and desire; and new directions within feminist television criticism.

Publications

Selected publications

  • Emotion Online: Theorising Affect on the Internet, co-authored with Joanne Garde-Hansen (Palgrave, 2013).
  • ‘Affect,’ in Key Concepts: Gender, Routledge. 2012.          
  • ‘From Old Media Whore to New Media Troll: The Online Negotiation of Madonna’s Ageing Body,’ with Joanne Garde-Hansen, Feminist Media Studies, Vol.13 (3), 2012.
  • 'Television as a Global Visual Medium,’ in The Handbook of Visual Culture, Ian Heywood and Barry Sandywell (eds), Berg, 2011.
  • Media Audiences: Television, Meaning and Emotion ( Edinburgh, 2009)
  • Theorising Desire: From Freud to Feminism to Film (Palgrave, 2008)
  • Psychoanalysis and the Portrayal of Desire in Twentieth-Century Fiction: A Feminist Critique (Edwin Mellen, 2007)
  • 'Desire, Duras and Melancholia: Theorising Desire after the Affective Turn', Feminist Review, Vol 89, pp. 16-33, 2008.
  • 'Domestic Desire: Framing Older Women's Sexuality in HBO's Six Feet Under and abc's Brothers & Sisters' in Feminism , Domesticity and Popular Culture, eds. Joanne Hollows and Stacy Gillis, Routledge: 2008.
  • ‘”There’s No Place Like Home: Emotional Exposure, Excess and Empathy on TV,’ Critical Studies in Television, 3 (1), pp. 3-15, 2008.
  • 'Theorising Emotion and Affect: Feminist Engagements,' Feminist Theory, 8 (3), pp.333-348, 2007.
  • 'The Point of View of Shame': Re-viewing Female Desire in Catherine Breillat's Romance (1999) and Anatomy of Hell (2004)', Studies in European Cinema, 4 (2), pp. 111-124, 2007.
  • 'Equality and the Media: The Example of Feminism,' in Rewriting Democracy: Cultural Politics in Postmodernity, ed. Elizabeth Deeds Ermarth: Ashgate, pp. 82-99, 2007.
  • 'A Sentimental Journey: Television, Meaning and Emotion', Journal of Popular British Cinema and Television, 3 (1), pp. 72-81, 2006.
  • ''Kiss my Tiara:' Consuming Girl Power,' Diegesis, Winter, No 8, 2004.
  • 'Critical Scenes of Desire in Marguerite Duras's The Ravishing of Lol V. Stein and Moderato Cantabile,' Dalhousie French Studies, Vol 63 Summer, pp.100-119, 2003.
  • '(Un)Fashionable Feminists: The Media and Ally McBeal', in Third Wave Feminism: A Critical Exploration eds. Stacy Gillis, Gill Howies, and Rebecca Munford, Palgrave: 2004, pp. 154-163.

 

 

      

 

                          

 

 

 

External activities

Editorial duties

While working in the School of Cultural Studies, I established connections within the television industry, which has helped to inform my research and teaching. For instance, as part of a Public Lecture Series, I interviewed the British television writer and actress Kay Mellor. This experience led to work as a script/dialogue consultant for Mellor’s American adaptation of Fat Friends and Between the Sheets.

Working within the industry has enabled me to establish television contacts, particularly in the north of England with Rollem Productions and ITV and with the writers and producers of soap operas such as Emmerdale, Coronation Street, and Fair City.

My work within the industry informs my commitment to the engagement between theory and practice in film & television studies.

Dr Kristyn Gorton

Contact details

Dr Kristyn Gorton
Department of Theatre, Film and Television
University of York
Heslington
York
YO10 5DD

Tel: +44 (0)1904 32 5222