Feminist Research Methodologies (GEMMA) - WOM00014M

« Back to module search

  • Department: Centre for Women's Studies
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Ann Kaloski-Naylor
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: M
  • Academic year of delivery: 2018-19
    • See module specification for other years: 2019-20

Module summary

This module is designed to equip students with a variety of different skills necessary to undertake and present feminist research at postgraduate level and to gain an understanding of key methodological, epistemological, ethical and political issues in women’s studies. We address significant perspectives within women’s studies research, with the emphasis on: a) cross-national, and culturally specific research methods; b) interdisciplinary practice; c) the critical use of textual, visual and qualitative methods; d) issues of language and meaning in cross-cultural research; e) the identification of salient topics and appropriate methodologies.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2018-19 to Summer Term 2018-19

Module aims

This module is designed to equip students with a variety of different skills necessary to undertake and present feminist research at postgraduate level and to gain an understanding of key methodological, epistemological, ethical and political issues in womens studies. We will address significant perspectives within womens studies research, with the emphasis on:

  • cross-national, and culturally specific research methods;
  • interdisciplinary practice;
  • the critical use of textual, visual, qualitative and quantitative methods;
  • issues of language and meaning in cross-cultural research;
  • the identification of salient topics and appropriate methodologies;
  • preparation for the IM (dissertation).

Module learning outcomes

After successfully completing this course students should:

  • Have an awareness of the range of methodological and ethical issues entailed in researching women and gender
  • Be attuned to the importance of both quantitative and qualitative data and methods in investigating gender issues
  • Have developed competence in interpreting a variety of textual and visual representations
  • Develop skills in interpreting diverse forms of data and be able to think critically about thestrengths and limitations of primary and secondary sources available to investigate gender in both historical and contemporary contexts
  • Have gained literacy in up-to-date methods of information retrieval and bibliography (including on-line data bases) and in the use of the Internet for research purposes
  • Have an understanding of the significance of interdisciplinarity for feminist enquiry
  • Have an appreciation of the benefits and potential pitfalls of cross-cultural research.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
3500-4000 word portfolio
N/A 90
Essay/coursework
Poster
N/A 10

Special assessment rules

None

Additional assessment information

A sample from the portfolio will be read and commented on by teachers part-way through the module.

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
3500-4000 word portfolio
N/A 100

Module feedback

Feedback for assessed work will normally be given within 20 working days in line with university policy. 

Indicative reading

Roisin Flood-Ryan and Rosalind Gill (eds.) Silence and Secrecy in the Research Process: Feminist Reflections London: Routledge, 2009.

Gayle Letherby Feminist Research in Theory and Practice Buckingham: Open University Press, 2003.

Jennifer Mason Qualitative Researching London: Sage, 1996. Practical guide.

Mary Maynard and June Purvis (eds) Researching Women’s Lives from a Feminist Perspective London: Taylor & Francis, 1994.

Richard Johnson, Deborah Chambers, Parvati Raghuram, Estella Tincknell (eds.) The Practice of Cultural Studies London: Sage, 2004.

Richard Rogers, Digital Methods Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2013.

Beverly Skeggs (ed) Feminist Cultural Theory: Process and Production Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1995.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.