Project Management - SPY00021M

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  • Department: Social Policy and Social Work
  • Module co-ordinator: Prof. Ellen Roberts
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: M
  • Academic year of delivery: 2018-19

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2018-19
B Spring Term 2018-19

Module aims

There are four main objectives for the module:

  • to enable you to understand the key stages within a typical project lifecycle and their fit to organisational strategy
  • to enable you to recognise where a project managers focus will deliver maximum value in terms of overall project success
  • to equip you with a knowledge of the practical skills required to organise and run a successful project which is aligned to organisational strategy and with the requisite planning, implementation and control, plus eventual delivery to the business as usual environment
  • to enable you to evaluate critically the theories and tools discussed in the module.

Module learning outcomes

By the end of the module you should be able to:

  • understand the project lifecycle and be able to analyse the key stages within it
  • critically assess and select appropriate project management methods and frameworks
  • apply skills to assist with project planning, implementation and control
  • place the projects with which you are concerned in a wider business context
  • develop a project proposition

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Project & Programme Management - Assignment
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Project & Programme Management - Assignment
N/A 100

Module feedback

The lead marker (the module tutor) will include comments about the content, structure, and evidence used etc. to provide you with constructive information that will enable you to improve on future work. The feedback a tutor can offer can be invaluable to your studies, so it is important you read this carefully

We aim to return your marked work to you within one month of its submission.

Feedback will be given in three ways:

(1) Comments within the actual text will highlight specific points and examples that the marker wants to draw to your attention.

(2) The marking criteria will be highlighted to show how your assignment has been rated against those criteria. This will enable you to calibrate your performance against a consistent scale, and therefore to aim to improve in specific areas.

(3) Finally the marker will provide a narrative summary in which the main points will be set out and any major areas for improvement highlighted.

Indicative reading

Haji-Kazemi, S., Anderson, B. and Klakegg, O. J. (2015)  Barriers against effective responses to early warning signs in projects, International Journal of Project Management, Vol. 33, No. 5, pp. 1068-1083

Khang, D. B. and Moe, T. L. (2008) Success criteria and factors for international development projects: a life-cycle based framework, Project Management Journal, Vol. 39, No. 1, pp. 72-84

Shenhar, A. and Levy O. (2001)  Project success: a multidimensional strategic concept, Long Range Planning, Vol. 34, No. 6, pp. 699-725.

Ward, S. and Chapman, C. (2003)  Transforming project risk management into project uncertainty management, International Journal of Project Management, Vol. 21, No. 2, pp. 97-105.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.