Victimisation & Social Harm - SPY00016I

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  • Department: Social Policy and Social Work
  • Module co-ordinator: Ms. Sharon Grace
  • Credit value: 30 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module summary

Traditionally criminology focused on the criminal and the criminal event and far less attention has been given to victims both inside and outside of the criminal justice process. Some people will be victims of the state or large corporations and the realisation that many victims will frequently be the least powerful and the most vulnerable in society increases the need for far-reaching effective responses designed to repair the harm done to them. This module aims to address these wider concepts of victimisation and their impact. By incorporating a global dimension to these discussions, it is also possible to reflect on both aspects of universality of the victim’s experience and also the differences between victims in developed and developing countries.

 

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20 to Summer Term 2019-20

Module aims

By taking this module you will develop a critical appreciation of research on victimisation (its nature, extent, patterns, contexts and consequences). You will explore debates about the boundaries of victimisation and its impacts and the international and global dimensions of victimology. The module includes detailed consideration of specific case studies to help you interrogate the role of the state and humanitarian crises in both creating social harm and dealing with its aftermath. You will also explore such topics as the impact of victimisation and how vulnerability exacerbates that impact; the unequal patterns and impacts of victimisation particularly in terms of race, gender, poverty and geography; the difficulties of acquiring victim status and thus recognition of harm and the acquisition of other benefits that that status guarantees. You will look beyond victims of ‘normal’ crime to examine wider notions of victimisation and harm caused by the state, unethical business practices, natural and environmental disasters, conflict, war and organised global crime and critically evaluate contemporary national and international policies and practices for responding to victims of crime and wider harms.

Module learning outcomes

You will develop a critical understanding of the concept of victimology as a sub branch of criminology and recognize the global nature of victimisation. You will be able to critically evaluate contemporary national and international policies and practices for responding to victims of crime and wider social harms and will have interrogated a range of contemporary examples of social harm to enable them to question traditional definitions of 'crime'. You will be able to critically analyse primary documents and data sources such as the International Victimisation Survey and the Crime survey for England and Wales and develop a clear understanding of the limitations of such sources and alternatives ways in which to retrieve information and data. You will appreciate and engage with the debates around and the development of national and international policies and practices for responding to victims of crime and wider social harm and be able to identify and explain patterns and impacts of victimisation particularly in terms of race, gender, poverty and geography.

 

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Additional assessment information

This assessment takes the form of a project based on a particular crime/harmful event of your choice. We offer below some suggestions of topics that you might consider:

  1. Natural or manmade disasters: tsunamis, floods, oil spillages, nuclear leaks or other forms of pollution; crowd-related disasters such as Hillsborough; or work-related disasters – rail crashes, mine collapses, building collapses etc.
  2. War crimes/genocide/actions in the aftermath of war.
  3. Hate crime (race, religion, sexuality, disability)
  4. Child sexual exploitation/historical child sexual abuse
  5. Trafficking/forced marriage/FGM
  6. Terrorist attacks
  7. Mass shootings
  8. Specific aspects of sexual/violent offending
  9. New forms of crime: scam mail, cyberbullying, trolling or identity theft.
  10. Social policy issues: homelessness, eviction, poverty, statelessness, experiences of care, deaths in custody, suppression of protest, neglect of disadvantaged groups by the state.
  11. Corporate crimes such as fraud, pension scheme scandals, pay day loans, saving schemes (eg Farepak).

In preparation for the final assessment you are required to complete a formative assessment You will be given written feedback on this formative assessment which will help ensure that you are going in the right direction for the main project.

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 100

Module feedback

In preparation for the final assessment you are required to complete a formative assessment You will be given written feedback on this formative assessment which will help ensure that you are going in the right direction for the main project.

Feedback on the final assessment is provided within four weeks of submission.

Indicative reading

 

  • Davies, P; Francis, P and Greer, C (2007) Victims, Crime and Society. London: Sage
  • Davies, P; Francis, P & Jupp, V (2000), Victimisation: theory, research and policy. Basingstoke: Macmillan
  • Goodey, J (2005), Victims and Victimology: research, policy and practice. Harlow: Longman
  • Hall, M (2010) Victims and Policy Making: a comparative perspective. Abingdon: Willan.
  • Hoyle, C and Young, R (2002) New Visions of Crime Victims. Oxford: Hart Publishing
  • Spalek, B (2006) Crime Victims: theory, policy and practice. Basingstoke: Palgrave
  • Walklate, S (2006) Imagining the Victim of Crime. Maidenhead: Open University Press
  • Walklate, S (2007) Handbook of Victims and Victimology. Collumpton: Willan
  • Williams, B (2009) Victims and Victimisation: a reader. Maidenhead: Open University Press.
  • Wolhuter, L; Olley, N and Denham, D (2009) Victimology: victimisation and victims rights. London: Routledge-Cavendish.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.