Advanced Qualitative Methods - SPY00001M

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  • Department: Social Policy and Social Work
  • Module co-ordinator: Prof. Christine Skinner
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: M
  • Academic year of delivery: 2018-19

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2018-19

Module aims

The aim of this module is further to develop students knowledge of the principles underlying qualitative research design, to enable them to gain an advanced level understanding of, and expertise in the use of, the key methods of qualitative data generation and to develop skills in qualitative analysis and interpretation. In addition to a more analytical grasp of the issues in relation to these areas, students skills will also be developed through exploring their use in the context of ongoing and completed research.

Module learning outcomes

On completion of this module students should:

  • be able to distinguish between method and design, data generation, analysis and interpretation
  • have a comprehensive and in-depth knowledge of the collection and analysis of the principal forms of qualitative methods and the types of data they generate
  • be able to analyse and interpret different forms of qualitative data
  • an appreciation of the range of research domains and issues to which these methodological techniques apply, including their application to practical research

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 100

Module feedback

Information currently unavailable

Indicative reading

These should be consulted throughout the module

  • Atkinson, P. and Delamont, S. (eds) (2011) Sage Qualitative Research Methods, L.A.: Sage
  • Bailey, C. A. (2007) A Guide to Qualitative Field Research, London: Pine Forge Press
  • Barbour, R. (2006) Introducing Qualitative Research, London: Sage
  • Bryman, A. (2008) Social Research Methods, Oxford: Oxford University Press
  • Bryman, A. (ed) (2007) Qualitative Research 2, L.A.: Sage
  • Bryman, A. and Burgess, R. (eds) (1999) Qualitative Research 1, London: Sage
  • Denzin, N. K. and Lincoln, Y. S. (2000) The Qualitative Inquiry Reader, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage
  • Denzin, N. and Lincoln, Y. S. (2011) The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research, L.A.: Sage
  • Flick, U. (2002) An Introduction to Qualitative Research, London: Sage
  • Flick, U. (2007) Designing Qualitative Research, London: Sage
  • Hesse-Biber, S. N. (2011) The Practice of Qualitative Research, London: Sage
  • Liamputtong, P. (2009) Researching the Vulnerable, L.A.:Sage
  • Liamputtong, P. (2010) Qualitative Research Methods, Oxford: Oxford University Press
  • Mason, J. (2002) Qualitative Researching, London: Sage
  • May, T. (ed) (2002) Qualitative Research in Action, London: Sage
  • Morse, J. and Richards, L. (2002) Read Me First: a Users Guide to Qualitative Methods, London: Sage
  • Padgett, D. (2008) Qualitative Methods in Social Work Research, London: Sage
  • Schwandt, T. A. (2001) Dictionary of Qualitative Inquiry, London: Sage
  • Shaw, I. and Gould, N. (2001) Qualitative Research in Social Work, London: Sage
  • Sherman, E. and Reid, W. (eds) (1994) Qualitative Research in Social Work, New York: Columbia University Press
  • Silverman, D. (2010) Doing Qualitative Research: a Practical Handbook, London: Sage
  • Silverman, D. (2011) Qualitative Research: Issues of Theory, Method and Practice, L.A.: Sage
  • Thomas, J. (1993) Doing Critical Ethnography, London: Sage



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.