Theories & Policies of Development Governance - POL00021M

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  • Department: Politics
  • Module co-ordinator: Prof. Louise Haagh
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: M
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2019-20

Module aims

This module looks at major theories and policies of development governance. Debates about how best to achieve economic and social development in the developing world have focused on what role the state should play in the development process. The module examines this question by charting trends in development policy from early state-led models of development, to the rise of neoliberalism and the more recent preoccupation with 'good governance'. It also considers how these trends have been reflected in a number of distinct policy areas within development governance and the merits of contending approaches to state-market relations in these contexts.

Module learning outcomes

Students will know about:

  • late industrialization and the East Asian developmental state
  • neoliberalism and structural adjustment
  • the roles of different forms of institutions in development
  • whether democracy is essential for effective development governance.

In addition, the module covers the governance of development in the areas of work, poverty, welfare and the promotion of 'social capital'. The module is multidisciplinary, introducing students to influential ideas in the politics, economics and political economy of development.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Theories & Policies of Development Governance - Essay
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Theories & Policies of Development Governance - Essay
N/A 100

Module feedback

Students will receive written timely feedback on their formative assessment. They will also have the opportunity to discuss their feedback during the module tutor's feedback and guidance hours.

Students will receive written feedback on their summative assessment no later than six weeks after submission; and the module tutor will hold a specific session to discuss feedback, which students can also opt to attend. They will also have the opportunity to discuss their feedback during the module tutor's regular feedback and guidance hours.

Indicative reading

Chang, Ha-Joon (2002) Kicking Away the Ladder, (Anthem Press)

Leftwich, A. (2000) States of Development: On the Primacy of Politics in Development (Polity Press)

Sen, A.K. (2000) Development As Freedom, (Oxford University Press)

Stiglitz, Joseph (2002) Globalization and its Discontents (Allen Lane)



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.