One to One Teaching: Intermediate - MUS00076M

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  • Department: Music
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Liz Haddon
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: M
  • Academic year of delivery: 2018-19
    • See module specification for other years: 2019-20

Module summary

The module develops students’ practical and reflective ability as instrumental/vocal teachers, building on skills developed during the previous term and relating to the teaching of an intermediate-level pupil.

Related modules

Co-requisite modules

  • None

Prohibited combinations

  • None

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2018-19

Module aims

The module continues to develop students’ practical and reflective ability as instrumental/vocal teachers, building on skills developed during the previous term and relating to the teaching of an intermediate-level pupil. The module facilitates further awareness of the learner’s needs and explores a range of teaching techniques. Through practical instrumental/vocal teaching students will apply theoretical knowledge relating to learning and teaching styles, motivation, the development of expertise, healthy instrumental/vocal practice, the teaching of skills relating to practising, aural, sight-reading, improvisation, composition, scales, repertoire and technique and the use of technology in teaching. The module builds on the reflective practice from Term 1 and enhances students’ awareness of their interpersonal skills and delivery of teaching and their ability to delineate this understanding in written form.

Module learning outcomes

Subject content:

  • Show understanding of the practical applications of research and convey principles of good instrumental/vocal teaching through work with pupils

  • Demonstrate awareness of the needs of the intermediate level pupil through creation and practical execution of a detailed lesson plan

  • Demonstrate clear understanding of the pupil-teacher relationship in teaching through verbal and non-verbal communication with the pupil during the lesson

  • Demonstrate knowledge and application of appropriate materials during the lesson

  • Demonstrate good time management skills

  • Demonstrate the ability to effect a change of understanding in the pupil

  • Demonstrate the ability to provide detailed notes for the pupil to take away after the lesson

  • Critically reflect on the outcomes of the lesson

  • Evaluate strategies chosen and applied during the lesson

  • Display evidence of understanding reflective strategies from literature

Academic and graduate skills:

Demonstrate clear writing style enabling reflection on the development of teaching ability during terms 1 and 2

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Commentary on lesson
N/A 50
Essay/coursework
Lesson for intermediate student
N/A 50

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Commentary on lesson
N/A 50
Essay/coursework
Lesson for intermediate student
N/A 50

Module feedback

Students will receive feedback on all submitted work within 20 working days of submission. It will be delivered in a written report with additional annotations on a copy of the lesson commentary

Indicative reading

Bassot, B. (2013). The reflective journal. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Daniel, R. (2006). Exploring music instrument teaching and learning environments: Video analysis as a means of elucidating process and learning outcomes. Music Education Research, 8(2), 191-215.

Daniel, R., & Bowden, J. (2013). The intermediate piano stage: Exploring teacher perspectives and insights. British Journal of Music Education, 30(2), 245-260.

Hughes, J. (1999). Improving communication skills in student music educators: A case study. Music Education Research, 1(2), 227-236.

Hughes, J. (2005). Improving communication skills in student music teachers. Part two: Questioning skills. Music Education Research, 7(1), 83-99.

Kivestu, T. & Leijen, A. (2014). A model for supporting students’ reflection in tertiary music education. Procedia - Social and Behavioural Sciences, 112, 199-208.

Parkinson, T. (2016). Mastery, enjoyment, tradition and innovation: A reflective practice model for instrumental and vocal teachers. International Journal of Music Education, 34(3), 352-368.

Pollard, A. (2002). Reflective teaching: Reflective and evidence-informed professional practice. London: Continuum.

Yeh, Y-L. (2016). An investigation of Taiwanese piano teachers’ reflection on teaching challenges and pupils’ learning difficulties. Music Education Research, 20(1), 32-43.

Young, V., Burwell, K., & Pickup, D. (2003). Areas of study and teaching strategies in instrumental teaching: A case study research project. Music Education Research, 5(2), 139-155.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.