Accessibility statement

The Health Needs of People who have Learning Disabilities - HEA00114I

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  • Department: Health Sciences
  • Module co-ordinator: Mrs. Deborah Watson
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20
    • See module specification for other years: 2018-19

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
B Spring Term 2019-20

Module aims

To develop a broad knowledge and skills base in relation to the unique health needs of people with learning disabilities. This will involve an exploration of the factors that influence health and well-being and a further development of the student's skills in relation to health action planning and health facilitation.

Module learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the role of the learning disability nurse in meeting the health needs of people who have a learning disabilities across the age continuum, in primary and secondary health services.
  2. Examine the legislation and best evidence underpinning the delivery of healthcare to people who have learning disabilities.
  3. Discuss the factors influencing the delivery of healthcare for people who have learning disabilities.
  4. Examine the concept and process of health action planning and health facilitation.
  5. Demonstrate an ability to provide accessible health related information for people who have a learning disabilities and their carers.
  6. Develop a range of therapeutic interventions to meet the health needs of people who have learning disabilities.
  7. Demonstrate an ability to deliver culturally competent healthcare for people who have learning disabilities.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay - 1500 words
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

Non-compensatable

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay - 1500 words
N/A 100

Module feedback

Written feedback for summative assessment is provided on the standard proforma, within the timescale specified in the programme handbook.

Indicative reading

  • Baillie, L. (Ed.). (2009). Developing practical nursing skills. 3rd edn. London: Hodder Arnold.
  • Blackman, N and Todd, S (2005). Caring for people with learning disabilities who are dying. UK: Worth Publishing.
  • Department of Health (2007). Our health, our care, our say: a new direction for community services. London: TSO.
  • Department of Health (2007). Good practice in learning disability nursing. London: Department of Health.
  • Department of Health (2002). Health action plans and health facilitation: detailed good practice guidance on implementation for Learning Disability Partnership Boards. London: Department of Health.
  • Department of Health (2001). Valuing people: a new strategy for learning disability for the 21st century. London: TSO.
  • Department of Health (2009). Valuing people now: a new three-year strategy for learning disability. London: Department of Health.
  • Giraud-Saunders, A. (2003). Valuing health for all: primary care trusts and the health of people who have a learning disability. London: Institute for Applied Health and Social Policy.
  • Mansell, J. (2010). Raising our sights: services for adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities. London: Department of Health.
  • MENCAP (2004). Treat me right! Better healthcare for people with a learning disability. London: Mencap.
  • MENCAP (2007). Death by indifference: following up the treat me right! report. London: Mencap.
  • MENCAP (2009). Best practice for end-of-life care and support for people with a learning disability. London: Mencap. Accessible at https://www.mencap.org.uk/about-learning-disability/information-professionals/health/end-life-care.
  • Michael, J. (2008). Healthcare for all: report of the independent inquiry into access to healthcare for people with learning disabilities. London: Independent Inquiry into Access to Healthcare for People with Learning Disabilities.
  • NHS (2007). Primary care service framework: management of health for people with learning disabilities in primary care. London: NHS.
  • Pawlyn, J. and Carnaby, S. (Eds.). (2009). Profound intellectual and multiple disabilities: nursing complex needs. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Thompson, J. and Pickering, S. (2001). Meeting the health needs of people who have a learning disability. London: Balliere Tindall.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.

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