Accessibility statement

Person-Centred Communication - HEA00113I

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  • Department: Health Sciences
  • Module co-ordinator: Mr. Paul Evans
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20
    • See module specification for other years: 2018-19

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20

Module aims

This module aims to provide students with the knowledge, skills and understanding underpinning person centeredness and communication which will help frame the way they support people who have a learning disability. It will also focus on their approaches to the work they undertake and how through person centred communication, individuals can begin to take control of their lives

Module learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the range of issues that impair communication for people who have a learning disability.
  2. Examine the range of approaches to communication assessment with people who have a learning disability.
  3. Identify a range of augmented communication intervention strategies.
  4. Understand the impact of their own values and beliefs and the impact of organisational structures and systems upon the person who has a learning disability.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the skills necessary to communicate effectively and build relationships and work in person centred ways with people who have a learning disability.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay - 3000 words
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

Non-compensatable

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay - 3000 words
N/A 100

Module feedback

Written feedback for summative assessment is provided on the standard proforma, within the timescale specified in the programme handbook.

Indicative reading

  • Abudarham, S. and Hurd, A. (Eds.). (2002). The management of communication needs in people with learning disability. London: Whurr.
  • Caldwell, P. (2008). Using intensive interaction and sensory integration: a handbook for those who support people with severe autistic spectrum disorders. London: Jessica Kingsley.
  • Department of Health (2001). Valuing people: a new strategy for learning disability for the 21st century. London: TSO.
  • Falvey, M. et al. (2000). All my life's a circle; circles, MAPS and PATHS. Toronto: Inclusion Press.
  • Goodley, D. (2000). Self-advocacy in the lives of people with learning difficulties: the politics of resilience. Milton Keynes: Open University Press.
  • Grobler, H., Du Toit, D. and Schenck, R. (2003). Person-centred communication: theory and practice. 2nd edn. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Kennedy, J., Sanderson, H. and Wilson, H. (2002). Friendship and community: practical strategies for making community connections in communities. Manchester: North West Training and Development Team.
  • Nind, M. and Hewett, D. (2005). Access to communication: developing the basics of communication with people with severe learning difficulties through intensive interaction. 2nd edn. London: David Fulton.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.

Coronavirus (COVID-19): changes to courses

The 2020/21 academic year will start in September. We aim to deliver as much face-to-face teaching as we can, supported by high quality online alternatives where we must.

Find details of the measures we're planning to protect our community.

Course changes for new students