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Understanding & Supporting Individuals with a Learning Disability who use Forensic Services - HEA00102H

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  • Department: Health Sciences
  • Module co-ordinator: Mr. Michael Wolverson
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: H
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20

Module aims

This module aims to provide students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to support people with a learning disability who have a history of offending behaviour associated with contemporary issues in forensic care. There will also be an emphasis on understanding the nature, causation and interventions relating to the self-injurious behaviour that is often prevalent in forensic settings

Module learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students will be able to:

  1. Critically explore the causative factors associated with offending behaviour and/ or self-injury.
  2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the psychosocial nature of offending behaviours and / or self injury.
  3. Critically analyse a range of interventions, models of service delivery and therapeutic approaches that can be used to support people who display offending behaviours.
  4. Critically explore interventions and therapeutic approaches that can be used to support people who self injure.
  5. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the legal and ethical aspects involved with this client group.
  6. Critically appraise of the role of the learning disability nurse within a multidisciplinary and multiagency context in relation to supporting those who self-injure and/ or those with offending patterns of behaviour and / or self injury.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Understanding & Supporting Individuals with a Learning Disability who use Forensic Services
3 hours 100

Special assessment rules

Non-compensatable

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Understanding & Supporting Individuals with a Learning Disability who use Forensic Services
3 hours 100

Module feedback

Students are provided with collective exam feedback relating to their cohort, within the timescale specified in the programme handbook.

Indicative reading

  • Atherton, H. and Crickmore, D. (Eds.). (2011). Learning disabilities; toward inclusion. London: Elsevier.
  • Chaplin, E., Henry, J. and Hardy, S. (2009). Working with people with learning disabilities and offending behaviour: a handbook. Brighton: Pavilion.
  • Department of Health (2007). Services for people with learning disabilities and challenging behaviour or mental health needs. London: DoH.
  • Gates, B. (Ed.). (2006). Care planning and delivery in intellectual disability nursing. Blackwell: Oxford.
  • Lindsay, W. (2009). The treatment of sex offenders with developmental disabilities. London: Wiley.
  • Mason, T., Phipps, D. and Melling, K. (2010). Forensic learning disability nursing role analysis. British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 39, 121-129.
  • Mental Capacity Act (2005). Deprivation of liberty safeguards: Code of Practice to supplement the main Mental Capacity Act 2005 Code of Practice. London: The Stationary Office. [Online]. Available at: www.publicguardian.gov.uk
  • Priest, H. and Gibbs, M. (2004). Mental health care for people with learning disabilities. London: Churchill Livingstone.
  • Riding, T., Swann, C., Swann, B. (2005) The handbook of forensic learning disabilities. London: Radcliffe.
  • Sellars, C. (2002). Risk assessment in people with learning disabilities. London: Wiley.
  • Wolverson, M. (2015) Learning disability in forensic setting. In B. Gates and K. Mafuba. (2015). Learning Disability Nursing; Modern Day Practice. London: CRC Press.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.

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