Garcia Lorca - ENG00112I

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  • Department: English and Related Literature
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Stephen Minta
  • Credit value: 30 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20
    • See module specification for other years: 2018-19

Module summary

García Lorca is the most widely known writer from Spain after Cervantes, the author of Don Quijote. The culture of his native Andalusia had a profound influence on his life and work, while his death in Granada, at the hands of fascist partisans in the early days of the Spanish civil war, confirmed his status as one of the great anti-totalitarian icons of the twentieth century.

The module is divided more or less equally between poetry and drama. Central to its concerns is the fascinating dialogue between tradition and modernity that occupied much of García Lorca’s life as an artist. He constantly re-thinks the relationship, determined to renew the vitality of Spanish literature, without sacrificing his passionate interest in the values and achievements of older Spanish art and culture. The core texts for the module are: the Romancero gitano of 1928, his collection of 18 ‘gypsy’ ballads; Poeta en Nueva York, a collection posthumously published in 1940, which reflects his experience of New York in 1929; and the three folk tragedies of the 1930s: Bodas de Sangre, Yerma, and La Casa de Bernarda Alba. Seminars will look at the relationship between Spanish politics and literature in the period before the Civil War; the relationship between high and popular art; the poetics and politics of marginality (‘gypsies’, Afro-Americans, homosexuals); and issues of creativity, violence, sterility, and repression.

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2019-20 to Summer Term 2019-20

Module aims

To introduce you to the work of the most famous writer of modern Spain and to explore the relationship between literature and politics in the increasingly conflictive world of the pre-Civil War period.

Module learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an informed understanding of and engagement with a range of poetry and drama of Garcí­a Lorca, in the original language.
  2. Demonstrate an informed understanding of and engagement with the historical and cultural contexts which helped shape the work of Garcí­a Lorca, particularly painting and music.
  3. Examine key debates and critical contexts, including the reception of García Lorca in post-Civil War Spain.

  4. Develop arguments and ideas which demonstrate a proficiency in critical thinking, research, and writing skills.

  5. Demonstrate a sound knowledge of Spanish, and an understanding of some of the key issues at stake in the act of translation.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
2,500 word essay
N/A 70
University - closed examination
Garcia Lorca
2 hours 30

Special assessment rules

None

Additional assessment information

You will be given the opportunity to hand in a 1000 word formative essay in the Spring term (usually in the week 7 seminar). Material from this essay may be re-visited in your summative essay and it is therefore an early chance to work through material that might be used in assessed work. This essay will be submitted in hard copy and your tutor will annotate it and return it two weeks later (usually in your week 9 seminar). Summary feedback will be uploaded to your eVision account.

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
2,500 word essay
N/A 70
University - closed examination
Garcia Lorca
2 hours 30

Module feedback

  • You will receive feedback on all assessed work within the University deadline, and will often receive it more quickly. The purpose of feedback is to inform your future work; it is provided in a pedagogical spirit, and the Department also offers you help in learning from your feedback.
  • If you would like to discuss your feedback, please consult your tutor or your supervisor, during their Open Office Hours
  • For more information about the feedback you will receive for your work, see the department's Guide to Assessment

Indicative reading

Texts may include:

  • the Romancero gitano of 1928,
  • his collection of 18 ‘gypsy’ ballads;
  • Poeta en Nueva York, a collection posthumously published in 1940, which reflects his experience of New York in 1929;
  • three folk tragedies of the 1930s:
    • Bodas de Sangre,
    • Yerma,
    • La Casa de Bernarda Alba.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.