Engineering Mathematics, Signals & Systems - ELE00031I

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  • Department: Electronic Engineering
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. John Szymanski
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2017-18

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2017-18 to Summer Term 2017-18

Module aims

Subject content aims:

  • To introduce the techniques of multivariable calculus (including partial differentiation, co­ordinate transformations and multiple integrals)
  • To support applied modules in areas such as networks, electromagnetic fields and control theory
  • To provide an introduction to the Laplace transform and the z­transform as tools for linear systems theory and analysis
  • To develop an awareness and understanding of the use of Fourier Transform, Fourier Series, Convolution and Correlation techniques to the study of signals and linear systems

Graduate skills aims:

  • To develop skills in the application of applied numeracy and algebraic techniques

Module learning outcomes

Subject content learning outcomes

After successful completion of this module, students will:

  • Understand the use of calculus for two­ and three­ dimensional problems
  • Understand the limitations of the Laplace transform in the context of engineering problems
  • Understand the implications of sampling signals and the basic theory of the z­transform
  • Be able to demonstrate an understanding of Fourier Series and Fourier Transform techniques
  • Be able to demonstrate an understanding of Convolution and Correlation techniques
  • Be able to explain and use the theorems associated with Fourier Transform techniques
  • Be able to describe the use of Correlation and Convolution techniques to analyse linear time invariant systems
  • Be able to evaluate total derivatives and multiple integrals in two or more variables
  • Be able to change variables and transform the way in which a multi­dimensional problem is viewed
  • Be able to use the Laplace transform in the analysis and characterisation of linear, time­invariant systems
  • Be able to compare and contrast the Laplace & Fourier transforms in an engineering context
  • Be able to apply Fourier Transform techniques to describe the characteristics of signals

Graduate skills learning outcomes

After successful completion of this module, students will:

  • Be able to explain commonly­encountered technical concepts concisely and accurately
  • Be able to select and apply a range of mathematical techniques to solve problems
  • Have developed skills in problem solving, critical analysis and applied mathematics

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Engineering Mathematics, Signals & Systems
2.5 hours 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Engineering Mathematics, Signals & Systems
2.5 hours 100

Module feedback

Feedback on the examination performance will be provided within six weeks. Formative feedback is provided in workshops.

Indicative reading

Digital Signal Processing: Concepts and Applications, Bernard Mulgrew, Peter Grant and John Thompson. Palgrave Macmillan, 2nd Edition, ISBN 0­333­96356­3



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.