Current Debates in Educational Psychology - EDU00047I

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  • Department: Education
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Lucy Foulkes
  • Credit value: 30 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module summary

This module introduces key psychological concepts, perspectives and practices relating to two major complementary aspects of educational practice in schools: teaching and pastoral care. The module is an opportunity to look at concrete issues involved in effective teaching and pastoral care in schools and to explore how psychological concepts can be used as a basis for interventions.

Professional requirements

None

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20 to Summer Term 2019-20

Module aims

In studying this module you will learn about key psychological concepts, perspectives and practices relating to two major complementary aspects of educational practice in schools: teaching and pastoral care. You will look at concrete issues involved in effective and inclusive teaching and pastoral care in schools and consider how psychological concepts can be used as a basis for interventions.

Module learning outcomes

Subject content

Students will be able to

  • Explain the key psychological concepts underpinning effective teaching and pastoral care in schools
  • Evaluate how theories and empirical research using key psychological concepts have informed our understanding of effective teaching pastoral care in schools

Academic and graduate skills

Students will be able to

  • Locate and engage with a variety of academic and psycho-educational sources.
  • Extract key points from articles, and to identify current debates and supporting evidence.
  • Contribute to discussions and debates in class and to critically reflect on them.
  • Communicate their ideas and understanding effectively, both orally and in writing.

Module content

The module has 22 class meetings (9 in the Autumn Term weeks 2-10; 9 in the Spring Term weeks 2-10; and 4 in the Summer Term weeks 1-4). These will involve tutor-led input, lectures, small group activities, class debates and student presentations using a range of materials. Each class will require the students to do preparatory readings and to complete follow-up activities. Preparatory readings will take the form of academic papers, reports or policy documents. Follow-up activities will include an individual learning log or a small-group work activity.

An outline of the sessions week by week:

Autumn Term

  • The psychology of pastoral care in schools.

  • Bullying, including cyber-bullying.

  • Truancy.

  • Exclusion from school.

  • Disruptive behaviour in schools

  • Child abuse.

  • Bereavement.

  • Juvenile delinquency.

  • Pupil stress and mental health.

 

Spring Term

  • The psychology of effective teaching in schools.

  • Teaching gifted pupils.

  • Teaching disadvantaged pupils.

  • Pupil motivation in the classroom.

  • Sex differences in achievement motivation.

  • Helping pupils develop thinking skills.

  • The nature of effective teaching.

  • The appraisal of classroom teaching.

  • Special schools and educational placement

 

Summer Term

  • Essay preparation workshop.

  • Research paper presentation 1.

  • Research paper presentation 2.

  • Research paper presentation 3.

 

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
2000 Word Essay
N/A 40
Essay/coursework
3000 Word Essay
N/A 60

Special assessment rules

None

Additional assessment information

A key feature of the module will be student presentations of specific research studies, small group activities, class debates and other student presentations using a range of materials. Each class will require the students to do preparatory readings and to complete follow-up activities. Preparatory readings will take the form of academic papers, reports or policy documents. Follow-up activities will include an individual learning log. Feedback will be provided in a variety of formats (such as oral and/or written tutor comments; peer feedback) for these activities, and will thus embed formative assessment.

 

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
2000 Word Essay
N/A 40
Essay/coursework
3000 Word Essay
N/A 60

Module feedback

Written feedback on assignment report sheet and face-to- face feedback in supervisions. The feedback is returned to students in line with university policy. Please check the Guide to Assessment, Standards, Marking and Feedback for more information.

Indicative reading

Atkinson, M., & Hornby, G. (Eds.). (2002). A mental health handbook for schools. London: RoutledgeFalmer.

Children’s Society. (2016). The good childhood report 2016. London: Children’s Society.

http://www.childrenssociety.org.uk/sites/default/files/pcr090_mainreport_web.pdf

Cline, T., Gulliford, A., & Birch, S. (2015). Educational psychology: Topics in applied psychology (2nd ed.). Abingdon: Routledge.

Cowie, H., Boardman, C., Dawkins, J., & Jennifer, D. (2004). Emotional health and well-being: A practical guide for schools. London: Paul Chapman.

Haydn, T. (2012). Managing pupil behaviour: Improving the classroom atmosphere (2nd ed.). Abingdon: Routledge.

Kyriacou, C. (2003). Helping troubled pupils. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes.

Kyriacou, C. (2009). Effective teaching in schools (3rd ed.). Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes.

Lines, D. (2011). Brief counselling in schools: Working with young people from 11 to 18 (3rd ed.). London: Sage.

Long, M., Wood, C., & Littlerton, K. (2010). The Psychology of Education. Abingdon: Routledge.

Purdy, N. (Ed.). (2013). Pastoral care 11-16: A critical introduction. London: Bloomsbury.



 



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.