Philosophy, Education & Children - EDU00041H

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  • Department: Education
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Lynda Dunlop
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: H
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module summary

This module aims to encourage you to critically reflect on the nature and purpose of education, and in particular of an education in philosophy. During this module, will examine perspectives on the place of philosophy in contemporary primary and secondary education, and the pedagogical issues associated with doing philosophy with children. Through theoretical and practical classes we will examine the nature of classroom relationships and consider the roles of teachers and children participating in philosophical dialogue.

 

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20

Module aims

This module aims to encourage students to critically reflect on the nature and purpose of education, and in particular of an education in philosophy.

Students will examine international perspectives on the place of philosophy in contemporary primary and secondary education, and the pedagogical issues associated with doing philosophy with children.

Students will examine the nature of classroom relationships and consider the roles of teachers and children participating in philosophical dialogue.

Students will analyse concepts such as childhood, freedom and justice through theoretical and practical classes.

Students will develop skills such as the ability to create and analyse arguments, to communicate in written and oral form, to participate in philosophical dialogue and to critically reflect on their own experiences.

Module learning outcomes

Subject content

During the study of this module, students will:

  • develop an understanding of the place of philosophy in formal and non-formal education

  • analyse their understanding of concepts including teaching, learning and childhood

  • develop an awareness of how children and young people can be encouraged to learn about the nature of knowledge, ethics and justice

  • critically engage with the debates associated with the teaching of philosophy to children

 

Academic and graduate skills

Students will develop a range of skills through individual and group work. They will:

  • Locate, read and evaluate a range of theoretical and empirical sources

  • Communicate effectively in written and oral form

  • Reflect critically on their own development through philosophical enquiry

 

Module content

Students will develop skills such as the ability to create and analyse arguments, to communicate in written and oral form, to participate in philosophical dialogue and to critically reflect on their own experiences. Each week consists of a theory class, a practical class, and an activity related to a reading which is submitted for feedback. The specific content of each session is determined by the group in response to a philosophical text as a stimulus. The following outline is indicative only

 

In weeks 2, 3 & 4 the theme will be knowledge, and we will explore ?useful? and ?useless? knowledge and certainty.

 

Week 2: Introduction to philosophy with/for children; philosophy in education; creating philosophical questions.

 

Week 3: Philosophy with/for children in the early years or primary school; philosophy with picturebooks.

 

Week 4: Philosophy with educators: knowledge as a curriculum aim; philosophy of education.

 

Weeks 5, 6 & 7 will focus on ethical issues, including those associated with doing philosophy with children, and in particular the role of the facilitator of philosophical dialogue.

 

Week 5: Ethics in education: for-profit schooling as an emerging sector; the role of profit in education.

 

Week 6: Educational inequalities and proposed solutions; being critical whilst working collaboratively.

 

Week 7: Practice and assessment workshop

 

Weeks 8,9 & 10 will cover the theme of justice, and in particular issues of social justice in education.

 

Week 8: Education ? schooling and anti-schooling; educational inequalities; potential practical workshop.

 

Week 9: Practical debrief; Justice ? thought experiments in education (Rawls? veil of ignorance)

 

Week 10: Synoptic class. Doing philosophy with children ? thinking about approaches, content, and methods.

 

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
5,000 word essay
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
5,000 word essay
N/A 100

Module feedback

Written feedback on assignment report sheet and face-to-face feedback in supervisions. The feedback is returned to students in line with university policy. Please check the Guide to Assessment, Standards, Marking and Feedback for more information.

Indicative reading

Indicative reading list

Biesta, G. (2006). Beyond Learning. Boulder: Paradigm
Cigman, R. & Davis, A. (2009). New Philosophies of Learning. Chichester: Wiley.

Chandley, N. & Lewis, L. (2012). Philosophy for Children through the Secondary Curriculum London: Continuum.

Hannam, P. & Echeverria, E. (2009). Philosophy with Teenagers. Nurturing a Moral Imagination for the 21st Century. London: Continuum.

Haynes, J. (2002). Children as philosophers. Abingdon: RoutledgeFalmer.Lipman, M., (1991). Thinking in Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Journal of Philosophy of Education

Kohan, W. (2014). Philosophy and childhood: critical perspectives and affirmative practices.

Palgrave MacMillan

Lipman, M., Sharp, A.M. and Oscanyan, F.S., (1980). Philosophy in the Classroom. 2nd edition. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

UNESCO (2007). Philosophy. A school of Freedom. Teaching philosophy and learning to philosophize: status and prospects. Paris: UNESCO.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.