Learning Gender: Exploring the Links Between Gender, Education & Society - EDU00035H

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  • Department: Education
  • Module co-ordinator: Prof. Vanita Sundaram
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: H
  • Academic year of delivery: 2017-18

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2017-18 to Summer Term 2017-18

Module aims

In this module we examine gender differences in access to, participation in and outcomes of education and critically discuss the underlying reasons for these. We will also consider the role of educational institutions in producing conventional understandings and expectations of male and female behaviour. The key question will be: how does gender influence participation, learning, attainment and identities in education? You will build on the knowledge you have gained in Stages 1 and 2 of the programme, thinking particularly about inequalities in education, social theory and sociology of education.

Module learning outcomes

Subject content

  • Critically examine their understandings of gender and reflect on their own expectations of appropriate male and female behaviour.
  • Understand the importance of making gender visible in educational and social theory
  • Engage critically with debates about gender differences in participation and achievement in education
  • Discuss how learner identities may be influenced by current understandings and expectations of gender and sexuality
  • Explore the role of schools in creating and maintaining gender hierarchy and stereotypes
  • Demonstrate an understanding of gender sensitivity in conducting and consuming research

Academic and graduate skills

  • Practice extracting key points from articles
  • Identify arguments and the evidence which support these
  • Engage with debates on and representations of special educational needs through a range of media and critically reflect on these
  • Communicate effectively orally and in writing
  • Develop IT skills by interacting with the VLE as an integral aspect of this module
  • Complete weekly learning logs through which they will demonstrate their understanding of key concepts

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay - 5000 words
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay - 5000 words
N/A 100

Module feedback

Individual written feedback reports, with follow-up tutor meeting if necessary. The feedback is returned to students within 6 weeks of submission.

Indicative reading

Butler, J. (2004). Undoing Gender. New York: Routledge.
Connell, R.W. (2006) Understanding Men: Gender Sociology and the New International Research on Masculinities. In: C. Skelton, B. Francis and L. Smulyan (eds), The SAGE Handbook of Gender and Education, pp 18-31. London: SAGE Publications.
Delphy, C. (2002). Rethinking sex and gender. In C.R. McCann and S-K.Kim (eds), Feminist Theory Reader. Pp 57-67. London: Routledge.
Francis, B. (2006) The Nature of Gender. In: C. Skelton, B. Francis and L. Smulyan (eds), The SAGE Handbook of Gender and Education, pp 7-17. London: SAGE Publications.
Myhill, D. & Jones, S. ((2006). She doesnt shout at no girls: pupils perceptions of gender equity in the classroom. Cambridge Journal of Education, 36 (1): 99-113.
Reed, L.R. (2006). Troubling boys and disturbing discourses on masculinity and schooling: a feminist exploration of current debates and interventions concerning boys in school. In M. Arnot & M. Mac an Ghaill (eds), The RoutledgeFalmer Reader in Gender and Education. Pp. 33-48. New York: Routledge.
Reay, D. (2006) Spice girls, nice girls, girlies and tomboys: gender discourses, girls cultures and femininities in the primary classroom. In M. Arnot and M. Mac an Ghaill (eds), The RoutledgeFalmer Reader in Gender and Education. Pp. 117-130. London and NY: Routledge.
Renold, E. (2007). Gendered Classroom Experiences. In C. Skelton, B. Francis and L. Smulyan (eds), The SAGE Handbook of Gender and Education. Pp. 439-452. SAGE Publications.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.