Key Concepts of Education - EDU00004C

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  • Department: Education
  • Module co-ordinator: Prof. Ian Davies
  • Credit value: 30 credits
  • Credit level: C
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20 to Summer Term 2019-20

Module aims

  • To introduce students to the study of education as a field,

· To introduce students to fundamental educational concepts, with a particular focus on introducing the following five areas of theory and research:

  • Curriculum, inequality, inclusion, teaching and learning.
  • To introduce students to contemporary issues that are being debated, researched and taught within the field of education.
  • To develop students’ critical understanding of ethical issues in relation to the study and practice of education.

Module learning outcomes

Subject content

· Be able to critically reflect upon contemporary issues related to the field of education, with a focus on introducing theory and research in: curriculum, teaching, inequality, inclusion and learning.

  • Have an understanding of key educational concepts and theories and the ways in which these apply to the study and practice of education.
  • Gain an understanding of the historical, social, and cultural construction of education

 

  • Be able to critically read and reflect on relevant literature within education

 

  • Become aware of the wide range of pathways for the application of educational theory and practice for a diverse range of teachers and learners

 

Academic and graduate skills

  • Formulate academic arguments in written and oral form
  • Be able to work effectively with others in a group and meet obligations to group members, as well as tutors
  • Analyse and critically evaluate research, policy and media literature on key issues within education
  • Use the VLE and Internet effectively

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay - 1500 words
N/A 33
Essay/coursework
Essay - 2000 words
N/A 67

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay - 1500 words
N/A 33
Essay/coursework
Essay - 2000 words
N/A 67

Module feedback

Individual written feedback reports with follow-up tutor discussion if necessary. The feedback is returned to students in line with university policy. Please check the Guide to Assessment, Standards, Marking and Feedback for more information.

Indicative reading

Arthur, J., & Davies, I. (2009). The Routledge Education Studies Textbook. London: Routledge.

Bartlett, S., & Burton, D. (2007). Introduction to Education Studies. London: Sage Publications.

Evans, L. (2007). Inclusion. London: David Fulton.

Gorard, S. et al (2006). Teacher supply: the key issues. London: Continuum.

 

Reay, D. (2018). Miseducation: Inequality, education and the working classes. Bristol: Policy Press

Stevens, D. (2010). A Freirean critique of the competence model of teacher education, focusing on the standards for qualified teacher status in England, Journal of Education for Teaching, 36(2), pp. 187-196.

 

Thompson, D.W. (2012). Widening participation from a historical perspective: increasing our understanding of higher education and social justice. In: Basit, Tehmina N and Tomilson, Sally Widening participation from a historical perspective: increasing our understanding of higher education and social justice. Bristol: Policy Press. pp 41-64.

Day, C., & Gu, Qing. (2010). The new lives of teachers (Teacher quality and school development series). London: Routledge.

Ambrose, S. A., Bridges, M. W., DiPietro, M., Lovett, M. C., & Norman, M. K. (2010). How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.