Education & Citizenship - EDU00003H

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  • Department: Education
  • Module co-ordinator: Prof. Ian Davies
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: H
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20

Module summary

During this module we will consider the meaning of citizenship: as a legal and political status, as a sense of identity and as an activity. These considerations will be related to ‘schools’ of citizenship that stress the liberal (rights based) and/or the civic republican perspectives. By considering these fundamental matters students will come to appreciate some of the choices open to teachers and learners as they learn about society and how to make a contribution to it.

 

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2019-20 to Summer Term 2019-20

Module aims

Citizenship is one of the key issues in contemporary society. The Scottish Parliament, the Welsh Assembly and developments in Northern Ireland allow us to ask questions about the future of the (Dis)United Kingdom. If we are citizens, where are we citizens of? When media reports focus on refugees and asylum seekers we are being asked to consider who does – and does not – ‘belong’. When someone is recognised as a citizen what is he or she expected or required to do? How far can we expect people to be loyal to the state? Should we be forced to participate? Should teachers require school students to think in certain ways and to do certain things? Where is the boundary between education and indoctrination?

During this module we will consider the meaning of citizenship: as a legal and political status, as a sense of identity and as an activity. These considerations will be related to ‘schools’ of citizenship that stress the liberal (rights based) and/or the civic republican perspectives. By considering these fundamental matters students will come to appreciate some of the choices open to teachers and learners as they learn about society and how to make a contribution to it.

 

Module learning outcomes

Subject content

After completing the module, you will:

  • Understand the ways in which citizenship has been characterised

  • Understand the ways in which citizenship education has been framed by policy makers and others

  • Understand the choices open to teachers and learners as they develop programmes of citizenship education

Academic and graduate skills

  • Students will be expected to search a wide range of mainly written sources but are also expected to keep abreast of current media reports; they will analyse contemporary issues and the way in which those issues could be used as a basis for educational work; they will be required to communicate effectively in writing and by making presentations to the full group.

 

Module content

The module has 13 class meetings. These will involve tutor inputs and mini lectures, workshop activities, discussions and student presentations of different kinds. Each session will require you to do reading preparation and some follow up activities. The weekly required readings and the follow up activities are provided in detail on the VLE. You will be required to read theoretical and academic work, policy documents, and newspaper articles. Follow up activities include: making formal presentations to the seminar group and discussing key issues about citizenship and citizenship education.

 

The reading and follow up activities will take a long time to complete so make sure you have built in to your weekly schedule time to complete these tasks. The tutor led sessions outlined below represent only part of this module. As part of your studies it is important that you embark on a process of self-directed learning in addition to the formal seminars.

 

An outline of content by week (university timetable):

 

Spring

 

Week 2 Introduction. What are the grand themes? Who is a citizen? What is citizenship education?

 

Week 3 Key traditions in citizenship: liberal and civic republican perspectives (rights and duties: rights and wrongs)

 

Week 4 Community citizenship and service learning: whose community and who is serving whom?

 

Week 5 National citizenship: promoting patriotism?

 

Week 6 European citizenship: the work of the Council of Europe and European Commission for citizenship education: “L’Europe, c’est nous”?

 

Week 7 Global citizenship: what is it, who promotes it and do we want it?

 

Week 8 Resources for teaching citizenship: textbooks, blogging and beyond

 

Week 9 Assessing citizenship: can you test citizenship? Can you be a failed citizen?

 

Week 10 Overview: what have we learned so far?

 

Summer

 

The first three weeks of the summer term will look at new developments in citizenship education:

 

Week 1 The twitter revolution? Is social media transforming citizenship?

 

Week 2 Citizenship education compared: the new Australian national curriculum

 

Week 3 Is Marshall’s classic account of citizenship still relevant?

 

The final week of the module will be devoted to an essay preparation workshop

 

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay (5000 words)
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay (5000 words)
N/A 100

Module feedback

Written feedback on assignment report sheet (within 4 - 6 weeks) and face-to- face feedback in supervisions.

Indicative reading

D. Heater (1999) What is Citizenship? Cambridge, Polity Press.

D. Kiwan (2007) Education for Inclusive Citizenship. London, Routledge.

Davies, I. et al (2014). Creating citizenship communities. Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan.

Chong, E. et al (2015). Education, globalization and the nation. Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan.

Sant, E. et al (2018). Global Citizenship Education. London, Bloomsbury.

Davies, I (et al) (2018) The Palgrave Handbook of Global Education and Citizenship. Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.