Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science - COM00005C

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  • Department: Computer Science
  • Module co-ordinator: Prof. Colin Runciman
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: C
  • Academic year of delivery: 2017-18

Module occurrences

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2017-18 to Summer Term 2017-18

Module aims

The aims of this module are to:

  • Lay the foundations in discrete mathematics commonly required in many areas of computer science
  • Reinforce the concept of mathematical proof, including constructive proof by giving an algorithm

Module learning outcomes

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • read, understand and apply definitions and theorems in basic discrete mathematics;
  • formulate simple definitions, examples and proofs in discrete mathematics;
  • understand the concepts of formal languages, automata and grammars, and the relation between them;
  • understand in more detail (1) regular languages and finite automata, (2) context-free languages and pushdown automata.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science - Exam 1
1.5 hours 50
University - closed examination
Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science - Exam 2
1.5 hours 50

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
University - closed examination
Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science - Exam 1
1.5 hours 50
University - closed examination
Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science - Exam 2
1.5 hours 50

Module feedback

Unassessed tests

  • Autumn week 5, 0.5 hour
  • Autumn week 9, 0.5 hour
  • Spring week 6, 0.5 hour
  • Spring week 10, 0.5 hour
  • Summer week 4, 0.5 hour

Tests and practicals are not only an important part of the learning process; they provide an opportunity for feedback. Problem sheets are issued for each practical, to be completed in advance of the following practical. Lecturers and graduate demonstrators offer feedback on students' solutions. Model solutions are provided for comparison.

After each exam, summary feedback is provided for the whole class. Students also have supervised access to their marked exam scripts.

Key texts

** Dean N., The Essence of Discrete Mathematics, Prentice Hall, 1997

** Haggarty R., Discrete Mathematics for Computing, Addison Wesley, 2002

** Truss J., Discrete Mathematics for Computer Scientists, Addison Wesley, 1999

** Cohen D.I.A., An Introduction to Computer Theory (2nd ed.), Wiley, 1997

** Linz P., An Introduction to Formal Languages and Automata (4th ed.), Jones and Bartless, 2006

* Rodger S.H. and Finley T.W., JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package, Jones and Bartless, 2006

* Solow D., How to Read and Do Proofs, Wiley, 2005



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.