Chemistry for Natural Sciences II: Introduction to Analysis & Chemical Change - CHE00012C

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  • Department: Chemistry
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Glenn Hurst
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: C
  • Academic year of delivery: 2017-18

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Spring Term 2017-18 to Summer Term 2017-18

Module aims

This module builds on the introduction to chemical structure and reactivity module (Module 1/1A) and aims to introduce the students to molecular orbital theory, the principles of chemical kinetics, expand their understanding of thermodynamics to include entropy and to provide a detailed overview of more complex examples of organic reactivity. Once again, this is a fundamental module that will underpin much of the core chemistry studied in higher years of the degree. This module will include further training in practical chemistry and in particular, analysis.

Module learning outcomes

  • Students will gain an understanding of the principles of the NMR experiment and learn to assign and predict proton and carbon NMR spectra for simple organic molecules from first principles. Students will gain an insight into electronic, rotational and vibrational spectroscopy from a fundamental physicochemical point of view, and will be able to perform simple calculations to help interpret optical spectra of molecules.
  • Students will learn the principles of molecular orbital theory as applied to diatomic molecules and will use this knowledge to explain and predict the properties and behaviour of such molecules.
  • Students will learn about fundamental concepts of chemical kinetics - including an in-depth view of the rate law and how to understand chemical reactivity from a mathematical point of view. This will require use of students mathematical skills developed in other modules, including differentiation and integration. This lecture course is directly supported within the practical module.
  • Students will study in detail the transition metals, and in particular the crystal field model of bonding involving 3d orbitals. By understanding the bonding in such compounds, and the role played by the d electrons, students will be able to both rationalise and predict the reactivity and spectroscopic behaviour of this type of compound.
  • Students will achieve a detailed knowledge of the chemistry of carbonyl and aromatic chemistry. By applying curly arrow mechanisms they will be able to predict and rationalise reaction pathways, interpret experimental results, and propose multi-step synthetic sequences.
  • Students will integrate their knowledge of analytical techniques through an analysis practical course. They will learn to use a range of new instrumentation, including different types of chromatography and spectroscopy. In addition to developing practical skills, students will also learn about data-handling, teamworking and the accurate presentation of experimental data

Module content

Module Structure

Molecular Orbital Theory

CED

5 lectures

Tutorial

Kinetics

MJE/MSS

10 lectures

Tutorial

Transition Metal Chemistry

AKDK

10 lectures

Tutorial

NMR, Electronic, Vibrational and Rotational Spectra

GAH

8 lectures

Workshop

Aromatic Chemistry and Organic Carbonyls

GAH

8 lectures

Tutorial

Analysis Practical

GAH

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Aromatics and Organic Carbonyl : assessed workshop
N/A 15
Essay/coursework
NMR, Electronic, Vibrational.. : assessed workshop
N/A 15
Practical
Analysis Practical
N/A 10
University - closed examination
Chemistry Natural Sciences II
1 hours 60

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Aromatics and Organic Carbonyl : assessed workshop
N/A 15
Essay/coursework
NMR, Electronic, Vibrational.. : assessed workshop
N/A 15
University - closed examination
Chemistry Natural Sciences II
1 hours 60

Module feedback

Weekly feedback is provided for college tutorial assignments, both verbally and through written feedback on assignments. Supervisors will also discuss performance in college tutorials and workshops at end-of-term meetings through the college marks sheets that are returned to supervisors termly. Feedback on practical writeups is provided weekly through both annotation of scripts by markers and verbally by Graduate Teaching Assistants. Students receive their marks for practical write-ups on a weekly basis and collectively via supervisors at end-of-term meetings. The closed examinations held in Wk7 SuT are marked typically within 10 days with scripts and mark slips being returned to students via supervisors towards the end of Week 10 of the Summer Term. Examiners reports on each question are made available to students via the Chemistry web pages. Failing students or those whose performance is a cause for concern are written to by the Chair of the Examiners and Chair of the Board of Studies following the Spring term closed examination.

Indicative reading

"Chemistry3: Introducing Inorganic, Organic and Physical Chemistry, 2nd edition" by Burrows, Parsons, Price, Holman and Pilling (published by Oxford University Press, 978-0-19-969185-2)



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.