Special Topic: The Archaeology of Africa - ARC00070H

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  • Department: Archaeology
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Stephanie Wynne-Jones
  • Credit value: 30 credits
  • Credit level: H
  • Academic year of delivery: 2019-20
    • See module specification for other years: 2018-19

Module summary

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2019-20

Module aims

The aims of the course are:

  • To cover current debates within African archaeology, inspired by the most recent research. These disciplinary arguments show how archaeologists actively engage in the construction of a nuanced and rich prehistory of the people that lived on the African continent.

  • To explore the unique methodologies that African archaeology employs, bringing together data from ecological reconstructions, material culture, oral traditions, historical linguistics and historical documents.

  • To challenge popularly-received wisdom about the precolonial African past, an image born of the colonial period itself, and one used to legitimize and construct those hegemonies.

Module learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students will be able to:

  • demonstrate a broad and comparative knowledge of the archaeology of Africa, from the stone age to the present day

  • critically discuss and assess the key theories, methods and debates, and their limitations

  • critically evaluate primary data and evidence

  • communicate an in-depth, logical and structured argument, supported by archaeological evidence

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay
N/A 100

Module feedback

Arrangements for the return of feedback are detailed on the formative and summative assessment web pages.

Indicative reading

Reading is published on the module web pages and VLE.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.