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World Archaeology I: The Invention of World Heritage - ARC00056I

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  • Department: Archaeology
  • Module co-ordinator: Dr. Louise Cooke
  • Credit value: 20 credits
  • Credit level: I
  • Academic year of delivery: 2021-22

Module summary

The module examines the impact of the 1972 UNESCO World Heritage Convention which created the World Heritage list. Each lecture of this module explores examples of different world heritage sites exploring the various themes and issues posed by the ‘invention’ of World Heritage.

Students enjoy examining the ways in which the past is used in the present to create national identity and examining the impact of conflict, overtourism, natural disasters and the climate crisis on heritage. 

Module will run

Occurrence Teaching cycle
A Autumn Term 2021-22

Module aims

The World Archaeology I Modules seek to expose the students to the diversity of World Archaeology through an in depth review of a range of topics. Students will choose to study topics that interest them.

The specific aims of this option are:

  • To provide students with the opportunity to explore the debates and issues posed by the 1972 UNESCO World Heritage Convention.

  • To critically examine the issues associated with the nomination and management of heritage sites at a global scale in the 21st century.

  • To use case studies to understand the ways in which the World Heritage Convention is implemented and critically reflect on the issues posed.

  • To assess the advantages and disadvantages of the World Heritage Convention within the growing body of work relating to critical heritage studies

 

Module learning outcomes

By the end of the module the students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a broad and comparative knowledge of World Heritage sites around the world.

  • Discuss and explain the principal themes created and issues posed through the implementation of the 1972 World Heritage Convention.

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the 1972 World Heritage Convention and the organisations involved in its implementation and the creation and maintenance of World Heritage.

  • Critically appraise an international convention and understand the limitations of categorising and managing heritage at a global scale.

Module content

The module examines the impact of the 1972 UNESCO World Heritage Convention which created the World Heritage list. All continents and all time periods are now represented on the World Heritage list via cultural, natural or joint heritage sites. The World Heritage list has taken on extra political and economic dimensions where state parties are involved in the creation of national and international heritage. In addition to these issues of how heritage is created, the management of World Heritage Sites in the 21st century must also now respond to a broad range of issues relating to the representativeness of the list and issues relating to climate, conflict, disaster and tourism. 

Each lecture of this module explores the various themes and issues posed by the ‘invention’ of World Heritage and the management of World Heritage sites in the 21st century. Thematic lectures are supported with case studies of World Heritage sites around the world to examine these issues critically.

Content Warning: Week 7 case studies will cover destruction of cultural heritage and contested 20th century dark heritage sites, themes of cultural heritage destruction and contested heritage will be discussed.

Assessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay 2000 words
N/A 100

Special assessment rules

None

Reassessment

Task Length % of module mark
Essay/coursework
Essay 2000 words
N/A 100

Module feedback

Formative: The marker will share written feedback with you in a timetabled one-to-one meeting and you will have the opportunity to ask further questions about how to improve your work before your summative assessment. If you are unable to attend the feedback session, your tutor will share the formative feedback with you digitally.

Summative: Written feedback sheets will be uploaded to your e:vision account (your personal University of York online services account) within 20 working days of the submission deadline, along with your overall mark for the module. If you have any questions about your mark and/or your written feedback, you will be able to sign up for office hours with the marker.

 

Indicative reading

Donnachie, I. World heritage. In Harrison, R (eds). Understanding the Politics of the Past. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press in association with The Open University. pp 115-153.

 

Baird, M. UNESCO’s World Heritage List Process. n: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology. Springer International Publishing, pp 7445-7450

https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0465-2_1920

 

And familiarise yourself with UNESCO World Heritage Centre - World Heritage List http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/

Detailed reading for the module will be available via YorkShare (the University's virtual learning environment). When you have enrolled on a module, you will be able to access the full reading list.



The information on this page is indicative of the module that is currently on offer. The University is constantly exploring ways to enhance and improve its degree programmes and therefore reserves the right to make variations to the content and method of delivery of modules, and to discontinue modules, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Where appropriate, the University will notify and consult with affected students in advance about any changes that are required in line with the University's policy on the Approval of Modifications to Existing Taught Programmes of Study.