Louise Newbould

Dr Louise Newbould
Research Associate

Visit Louise Newbould's profile on the York Research Database to see publications, projects, collaborators, related work and more.

Louise initiated her career at the School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at the University of Sheffield, completing her BMedSci (Hons) in Health Sciences (2009) and Masters Degree in Public Health and International Development (2011). Louise developed her career in health services research and advanced her interest in the evaluation of complex interventions, completing a doctoral thesis (2018) evaluating the use of videoconferencing for remote healthcare provision for older adults in care homes.

Louise started her post-doctoral career as a Research Fellow on the CHAMP-1  and IMPACT projects at the University of York (2018). Following on from this she worked at the Centre for Primary Care, University of Manchester on the RTI-RAND project (2018-2019). This project aimed to develop a guide to inform parents’ decision making about when may be appropriate to consult a GP if their child has a suspected respiratory tract infection.

Louise re-joined the University of York as part of the Social Policy Research Unit in 2019. She now works on the HOPES study which aims to develop a support worker intervention to improve engagement in social care amongst older adults with mental health problems.

Qualifications

PhD, University of Sheffield

MPH, University of Sheffield

BMedSci (Hons), University of Sheffield

Current / recently completed research

Reducing delayed transfers of care (DTOC) for older adults with frailty: a systems-thinking approach to health and social care processes August 2020 - January 2022

This study aims to explore the role of complex social care systems in delayed transfers of care.

Helping older people to engage effectively with community social care (The HOPES study)September 2019 - February 2021

This study aims to understand how support workers help older adults with mental health needs to accept and receive social care.