Bryony Beresford

Professor Bryony Beresford
Co-Director of SPRU

Visit Bryony Beresford's profile on the York Research Database to see publications, projects, collaborators, related work and more.

Bryony joined SPRU in 1991. Since then she has led numerous projects, employing a wide range of research designs and methods. Much of her earlier work concerned children, young people and young adults with long-term or life-limiting conditions or impairments. More recently, whilst retaining an expertise and close interest in this group, her portfolio of work has expanded to include other populations including adults with autism, and frail older people. She also has long-standing interests in parent-directed interventions to manage sleep and behaviour difficulties, and work-related stress in the health and social care workforce. Bryony was appointed Co-Director of SPRU in February 2016.

Qualifications

  • BSc (Hons), University of Surrey
  • PhD, University of Exeter

Current / recently completed research

Disability, care and participation: secondary analysis of the Life Opportunities Survey and the 2009/10 Survey of Carers in HouseholdsMarch 2015 - August 2016

This project is reanalysing data from three national surveys of caring and of impairment and disability.

CATCh-uS project: Children and adolescents with ADHD in transition between children’s services and adult services

The children and adolescents with ADHD in transition between children’s services and adult services project focuses on what happens to young people with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) when they are too old to stay within children’s services.

IAMHealth: Improving outcomes for people with autism spectrum disorders by reducing mental health problems

The IAMHealth study is a programme grant funded by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR), entitled “Improving outcomes for people with autism spectrum disorders by reducing mental health problems”. This programme focuses on decreasing mental health problems as a strategy for improving outcomes for people with ASD and their families.

Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for non-respiratory sleep disturbances in children with neurodevelopmental disorders: a systematic reviewFebruary 2016 - January 2017

Many children with neurodisabilities experience sleep problems: this project is reviewing existing evidence on the effectiveness of the different ways sleep difficulties may be managed.

The MoRE project: models of reablement evaluation: a mixed methods evaluation of a complex interventionOctober 2014 - July 2017

This mixed-methods study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different ways of providing reablement in England.

The SHAPE project: mapping and evaluating Specialist Autism Team service modelsSeptember 2014 - March 2019

This project is evaluating Specialist Autism Teams, and investigating their role in supporting autism-specialist practice in mainstream services.

The Making Sense? study: how do parents and young adults with Autistic Spectrum Disorders make sense of behaviour problems and mental health difficulties?September 2014 - April 2019

This study is exploring how young adults with Asperger syndrome, and parents of children with autism, understand and make sense of emotional and behavioural difficulties.

The PEDRO study: partnerships between deaf people and hearing dogsOctober 2016 - March 2020

The PEDRO study is evaluating and exploring hearing dog partnerships. The aim of the study is to understand the impacts and experiences of these partnerships, and their place within wider support and provision for deaf people and people with hearing loss.

Specialist Paediatric Palliative Care Input for Children with MalignanciesJune 2017 - March 2018

Cancer is the second most common cause of death in children in the UK. However, previous research shows that very few children have involvement of specialist paediatric palliative care services prior to death. This study aims to summarise the evidence from previous studies about the benefits or difficulties, and barriers or facilitators, to the involvement of specialist paediatric palliative care in children with cancer, and gain the opinions of key stakeholders as to how services should be provided. This will then enable us to develop a grant application to develop, and evaluate, an intervention/model of care.

The Martin House Centre for Children's Palliative Care 2017 to 2021February 2017 - February 2022

The Martin House Research Centre is a partnership between Martin House Children’s Hospice, the University of York (Department of Health Sciences and the Social Policy Research Unit) and the University of Leeds. It is a multi-disciplinary centre for research on the care and support of children and young people with palliative care needs, their families and the palliative care workforce. The Centre will be holistic in its scope, recognising that the care and support needs of children and families span clinical/medical, social, parenting/caring, spiritual, financial and practical domains.

A systematic scoping review of research prioritisation exercises relevant to children and young people with life-limiting conditionsJanuary 2017 - September 2017

This review is part of the early priority-setting work by the Martin House Research Centre. The results will contribute to the Centre’s decisions regarding the focus of its work.

The THINC project: therapy interventions for children with neurodisability - a scoping study of current practice and perceived research needsMay 2016 - February 2017

This scoping study will be used to inform future research into physical, occupational and speech and language therapy support used by children with neurodisabilities.

External roles

  • Topic Advisor - NICE Transition Guidance Development Group
  • Member - MENCAP External Advisory Forum
  • Member - Advisory Board to Department of Health’s Policy Research Unit in the Health of Children, Young People and Families (CPRU)
  • Member/Chair of a number of external Study Steering Committees/Project Advisory Groups

PhD students

Co-supervisor of Debbie Box (Department of Health Sciences): The use of paediatric advance care plans in children’s palliative care.

Co-supervisor of Mary Barker (Department of Health Sciences): The mental well-being of children and young people with life-limiting conditions: https://www.york.ac.uk/healthsciences/our-staff/students/mary-barker/

Co-supervisor of Liam Robson (Department of Health Sciences): Siblings of children with life-limiting conditions: https://www.york.ac.uk/healthsciences/our-staff/students/liam-robson/