Keise Izuma
Lecturer

Profile

Biography

  • University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA. BS in Psychology (2003)
  • Hokkaido University, Japan. MA in Social Psychology (2006)
  • National Institute of Physiological Sciences (Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Japan. Ph.D. in Cognitive Neuroscience (2009)

Career

  • Tamagawa University, Brain Science Institute, Japan. Postdoctoral Research Fellow (2009)
  • California Institute of Technology, USA. Postdoctoral Research Fellow (2010-2013)

Research

Overview

My research interests lie in the area of social cognitive neuroscience and include social decision-making, pro-social behaviour, social influence, stereotype & prejudice, attitude change, and cognitive consistency (e.g., cognitive dissonance theory, balance theory).

Available PhD research projects

I am open to supervising PhD students. If you are interested in
applying to do a PhD, please feel free to email me.

Publications

Selected publications

  • Izuma, K., Akula, S., Murayama, K., Wu, D., Iacoboni, M., & Adolphs, R. (2015). A Causal Role for Posterior Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Choice-Induced Preference Change. Journal of Neuroscience, 35, 3598-3606.
  • Izuma, K., & Adolphs, R (2013). Social manipulation of preference in the human brain. Neuron. 78, 563-573.
  • Izuma, K. (2013). The neural basis of social influence and attitude change. Current Opinion in Neurobiology. 23, 456–462.
  • Izuma, K. (2012). The social neuroscience of reputation. Neuroscience Research, 72, 283-288.
  • Izuma, K., Matsumoto, M., Murayama, K., Samejima, K., Sadato, N., & Matsumoto, K. (2010). Neural correlates of cognitive dissonance and choice-induced preference change. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA. 107, 22014-22019.
  • Izuma, K., Saito, D.N., & Sadato, N. (2008). Processing of social and monetary rewards in the human striatum. Neuron, 58, 284-294.

Full publications list

Google Scholar profile


Contact details

Dr Keise Izuma
Lecturer
Department of Psychology
Room PS/B207

Teaching

Undergraduate

  • Brain & Behaviour 1 (Year 1)
  • Social and Affective Neuroscience (Year 3)