This event has now finished.
  • Date and time: Monday 1 October 2018, 4.30pm to 5.30pm
  • Location: Bowland Auditorium, Berrick Saul Building, Campus West, University of York (Map)
  • Audience: Open to Open to all
  • Admission: Free admission, booking not required

Event details

History of Art research seminar series

In 1996 the art historian Michael Fried wrote: 'Nothing more reveals the extent to which art history has still not come to terms with the situation of advanced French painting in the early 1860s than the obscurity surrounding the name of Legros.' More than twenty years later, not much has changed -- except that, since Legros lived in London from 1863 until his death in 1911, one might be tempted to add: 'Nothing more reveals the extent to which art history has still not come to terms with the situation of advanced British painting in the later nineteenth century than the obscurity surrounding the name of Legros.' This talk asks why Legros has remained in obscurity despite his centrality to the art-worlds of both London and Paris in the later nineteenth century, his commitment to radical politics, and the sheer quality of his painting.

Born in Boston, Massachusetts, Liz studied American art and architecture at Harvard University, before moving to London to study British and French art at the Courtauld Institute. She has worked as Curator of Paintings and Sculpture at Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery and held chairs at the Universities of Plymouth and Bristol. Liz joined the York department in 2012 and served as Head of Department until 2016.

Liz is an active guest curator and has co-curated exhibitions on Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and John William Waterhouse. In 2011 she gave the Paul Mellon Lectures at the National Gallery, London, on ‘The National Gallery and the English Renaissance of Art’.

Venue details

  • Wheelchair accessible
  • Hearing loop