• Date and time: Wednesday 3 December 2014, 7.00pm
  • Location: Room P/L001, Physics
  • Admission: is free and open to all. No ticket required.

Event details

PhysSoc Public Lectures

Please note this lecture is now being held on Wednesday 3 December and not Tuesday 2 December as previously advertised.

Fusion holds the promise of safe, essentially unlimited energy from abundant sources, with no long-term radioactive waste. The high temperatures of around 100 million degrees required for a significant number of fusion reactions has made achieving this goal much more difficult than hoped in the 1950s and '60s, but enormous progress has been made: The ITER machine currently being built in France is designed to run continuously for minutes at a time, and to produce 10 times more fusion power out than is required to sustain it. The success of this project would represent a major milestone in the progress towards commercial fusion power. Several challenges remain to be overcome, however, before fusion power can be economically viable. In particular, the walls of the machine must be protected from neutron damage, and from intense heat loads which could cause damage and costly repairs. This talk will present the current understanding of how heat and particles in the fusion reactor (tokamak) interact with the walls of the machine, and how they can be controlled. Research at York includes experiments on machines such as JET and MAST in the UK, and simulations to interpret experiments and to improve designs.

Please note this lecture is now being held on Wednesday 3 December and not Tuesday 2 December as previously advertised.

Dr Ben Dudson, Physics