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Research seminars

These seminars are normally held on Wednesdays from 4pm until 5.30pm. The series includes papers by visiting speakers, as well as presentations by University of York staff and current research students.

Fri
22
Jan

Music Coding Collective, week two

Presentation by the creator of Tweakable (a really beautiful site for making interactive music in the browser).

Fri
29
Jan
Fri
5
Feb

Music Coding Collective, week four

Presentation by the creator of Citizen DJ (a wonderful way to make music from existing free-to-use audio and video) and many other wonderful things!

Fri
12
Feb

Music Coding Collective, week five

Book club: Mike Monteiro, “Ruined by design”

Wed
17
Feb
Fri
19
Feb
Fri
26
Feb

Music Coding Collective, week seven

Presentation on analysing symbolic music representations with JavaScript/Node.js.

Fri
5
Mar

Music Coding Collective, week eight

Presentation on using Max for Live with old synth and drum machines.

Fri
12
Mar
Fri
19
Mar

Music Coding Collective, week ten

Presentation on composing game audio: A case study.

Wed
21
Apr

Research Seminar: Keeping Britain Musical

More details to follow soon.

Wed
26
May

Research Seminar: Electrosexual Music

More details to follow soon.

Recent events

Music for wellbeing? Reflections on research and implications for practice

Wednesday 20 January 2021

Caroline Waddington-Jones (University of York) explores the relationship between musical participation and wellbeing.

Research Seminar: ‘Every man sings for himself’: What we can learn from/about the principles and practices of nineteenth-century orchestral string sections

Wednesday 13 January 2021

Claire Holden (University of Oxford) considers why 19th-century string sections sound different to those of modern and 'period-instrument' orchestras today.

Research Seminar: ‘Getting it right’: Classical Music as a Middle-class Social Practice

Wednesday 2 December 2020

Anna Bull will draw on her recently published book, Class, Control, and Classical Music, to discuss why classical music remains predominantly played by white middle-class people in the UK.

Research Seminar: Reviving the Brave Belgians: Mechanical recording practices as a guide in historical performance

Wednesday 25 November 2020

This talk introduces Leverhulme-funded research project '(Re)constructing Early Recordings: a guide for historically-informed performance', which focuses on the reconstruction and simulation of the mechanical recording process to capture instrumental performances using wax cylinders and discs, alongside digital technologies.

Research Seminar: Fenced In! Imagining Musical Whiteness on the American Western Frontier

Wednesday 18 November 2020

Marta Robertson explores the iconic American ballet Appalachian Spring (1944) through the lens of Japanese American influences on the initial production.

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