Translating Freedom

Organiser: Paul Gready, Centre for Applied Human Rights

Overview

This research strand focuses on translations of 'freedom' in post-conflict settings. As democracy, human rights, revolution, reconciliation or in some other form, translations of 'freedom' are a vital component of internal national debates, external interventions and links between the two, in such settings. Two sectors have been identified as central to the translation offreedom in post-conflict settings:

  1. Human rights and transitional justice.
  2. Public culture, ranging from literature, film and theatre to community arts projects, graffiti and memorialisation.

As such, translations of freedom are situated at the intersection of institutions and norms on the one hand, and public debate and creativity on the other. Four country case studies have been selected for initial attention - Egypt, Northern Ireland, Rwanda, and South Africa. The four countries are at different stages on the post-conflict continuum, and provide a diverse set of challenges for the translation of freedom in the sectors outlined above.

Group members

  • Ziad Elmarsafy, Department of English and Related Literatures
  • Paul Gready, Centre for Applied Human Rights
  • Martin Jones, Centre for Applied Human Rights
  • Audra Mitchell, Department of Politics
  • Zoe Norridge, Department of English and Related Literatures
  • John Schofield, Department of Archaeology
  • Merran Toerien, Department of Sociology
  • Lars Waldorf, Centre for Applied Human Rights
  • Helen Weinstein, Institute for the Public Understanding of the Past

For more details contact paul.gready@york.ac.uk