Transformative justice and agrarian conflict: Elements for a necessary debate

News | Posted on Saturday 20 May 2023

Eric Hoddy, IGDC Member and Lecturer at the Centre for Applied Human Rights (CAHR), presents a new edited volume, Transformative justice and agrarian conflict: Elements for a necessary debate [Justicia transformativa y conflicto agrario. Elementos para un debate necesario (eds. José Antonio Gutiérrez Danton, Eric Hoddy, Daire McGill) published in Spanish with Santo Tomás University, Colombia).

Photo taken by Jose Gutierrez

This book project was conceived for introducing and gathering some initial reflections on the global debate on transformative justice and its relation to agrarian conflict and change. Published in Spanish with Santo Tomás University, Medellín, Colombia, the book discusses these questions through a series of interventions by the editors and by academics and practitioners based in Colombia. It focuses on the Colombian conflict, where, despite the peace process, the country is witnessing the reactivation of armed conflict. In some regions, violence and conflict have returned with a vengeance; in others they never left, and elsewhere, new forms of violence and dispossession are emerging in the post-demobilization setting. The book discusses the ideas and prospects of transformative agrarian justice, the intersections between agrarian inequality, structural and systemic violence, and peacebuilding through a transformation lens. 

In Chapter 1, José Gutiérrez and I introduce the global debate on transformative justice and discuss its significance in relation to agrarian conflict and change. We identify four key trends that might characterise the rural or agrarian settings for justice: 1) that peasants and other people living and working in rural areas remain exposed to direct and structural and systemic forms of non-war violence; 2) that transitional and post-conflict settings may be sites of deep grievances and protest that are rooted in political economy; 3) that post-conflict settings may have large numbers of rural victims where violence has sprung from issues around access and control of land, labour and financial capital and 4) that rural grievances and social conflict are helping fuel the global rise of authoritarian populism. Gutiérrez and I reflect on how a more transformative practice might operate in contexts characterised by such trends and in the Colombian context in particular. We draw on the work of the Pastoral Land Commission in rural Brazil for insight into the methods and practices through which transformative justice might be sought after.   

In Chapter 2, Dáire McGill presents the ‘structural violence matrix’ as a methodological tool for identifying the transformative potential of community initiatives and policies. McGill discusses how the notion of structural violence has been treated in global debates in transitional justice and applies the matrix to a case of the Peasant Reserve Zones in Colombia. His results suggest a mixed picture – that while the Peasant Reserve Zones guarantee land access and stimulate rural development there is yet to emerge a substantial transformation in structures of tenure and ownership. Looking ahead, McGill argues that integrating the Peasant Reserve Zones with other forms of peasant activism is perhaps where the greatest potential for transformation lies. The chapter demonstrates how local transformative justice and careful application of the law can influence the reduction of structural violence and the transformation of institutions. 

Chapters 3-5 provide a series of shorter critical commentaries on the ideas set out by the editors. In Chapter 3, Rocío Del Pilar Peña Huertas (Assistant Professor, Rosario University, Colombia and Deputy Director of the Land Observatory) reflects positively on the value of transformative justice amidst growing recognition of the limits of transitional justice mechanisms in Colombia. She indicates how such discussions create new opportunities for investigating social problems, how institutions are designed and evaluating public policies that impact the countryside. Rocío Del Pilar Peña Huertas highlights, however, the need for researchers to further develop the current repertoire of methodological tools for the evaluation of public policies and structural violence.

In Chapter 4, Irene Vélez-Torres (Minister for Mining and Energy in the Government of Colombia) provides reflections on the value of environmental perspective on transformative justice. She argues this perspective is needed both for producing a comprehensive and sustainable vision for rural justice and for responding to local and global socioecological crises more broadly. Transformative justice, she suggests, must feature as a component within transdisciplinary and multiscalar responses to socioecological crises that can “contribute decisively to peace and people’s wellbeing.”

In Chapter 5, Diana Marcela Muriel Forero (activist, feminist, and lawyer with the Colombian Commission of Jurists) provides a commentary on several key themes: the theoretical approach to transformative justice and restorative justice, general criteria specific to transformative justice, the particularities of transformative justice in the Colombian context and proposed methodologies. She argues that transformative justice must not lose sight of Colombia’s colonial reality, and that approaching structural violence requires “going back in history to unmask the germ of colonization and patriarchy” and to focus on cultural and symbolic processes.

Transformative justice is a relatively new agenda, with much of the discussion on the topic still residing in the academic institutions in the Global North. This volume, which arises through Santo Tomás University’s ‘New Trends in International Law’ seminar series, represents one of the first with Colombian researchers and practitioners that seeks to contextualise and discuss transformative justice in relation to agrarian questions, land and inequality in Colombia – a theme that many Global North transitional justice donors won’t fund (we thank Ruben Carranza for this observation). The chapters underscore the value of such discussions to the Colombian context, as María Isabel Cuartas Giraldo (Santo Tomás University) sets out in her summary of the volume: as an invitation to transcend the legal, institutional and temporal limits of transitional justice and of proposing concrete steps towards the social practice of transformative justice in this setting, where participation and opportunities for rural mobilization confront many challenges.

Eric Hoddy, miembro del IGDC y profesor del Centro de Derechos Humanos Aplicados (CAHR), presenta un nuevo volumen editado, Justicia transformativa y conflicto agrario: elementos para un debate necesario [Transformative justice and agrarian conflict: Elements for a necessary debate] (eds. José Antonio Gutiérrez Danton, Eric Hoddy, Daire McGill) publicado en español con la Universidad Santo Tomás, Colombia.

El proyecto de este libro fue concebido para introducir y recoger algunas reflexiones iniciales sobre el debate global sobre la justicia transformadora y su relación con el conflicto y el cambio agrario. Publicado en español con la Universidad Santo Tomás, Colombia, el libro aborda estas preguntas a través de una serie de intervenciones de los editores y de académicos y profesionales con sede en Colombia. Se centra en el conflicto colombiano, donde, a pesar del proceso de paz, el país asiste a la reactivación del conflicto armado. En algunas regiones, la violencia y el conflicto han regresado con fuerza; en otros nunca se fueron, y en otros lugares emergen nuevas formas de violencia y despojo en el escenario posdesmovilización de una parte importante de la FARC-EP. El libro analiza las ideas y perspectivas de la justicia agraria transformadora, las intersecciones entre la desigualdad agraria, la violencia estructural y sistémica y la consolidación de la paz a través de una lente de transformación. El libro, escrito en lenguaje laico, está dirigido a estudiantes y profesionales.

En el Capítulo 1, José Gutiérrez y Eric Hoddy introducen el debate global sobre la justicia transformadora y analizan su importancia en relación con el cambio y el conflicto agrario. Identificamos cuatro tendencias notables que podrían caracterizar los entornos rurales o agrarios para la justicia: 1) que los campesinos y otras personas que viven y trabajan en áreas rurales siguen expuestos a formas directas, estructurales y sistémicas de violencia no bélica; 2) que los escenarios de transición y posconflicto pueden ser lugares de agravios profundos y protestas que tienen sus raíces en la economía política; 3) que los escenarios posteriores a un conflicto pueden tener un gran número de víctimas rurales donde la violencia ha surgido de problemas relacionados con el acceso y el control de la tierra, el trabajo y el capital financiero y 4) que las quejas rurales y el conflicto social están ayudando a impulsar el aumento global del populismo autoritario. Gutiérrez y Hoddy reflexionan sobre cómo podría operar una práctica más transformadora en contextos caracterizados por tales tendencias y en el contexto colombiano en particular. Nos basamos en el trabajo de la Comisión Pastoral de la Tierra en las zonas rurales de Brasil para comprender los métodos y prácticas a través de los cuales se puede buscar la justicia transformadora.

En el Capítulo 2, Dáire McGill presenta la 'matriz de violencia estructural' como una herramienta metodológica para identificar el potencial transformador de las iniciativas y políticas comunitarias. McGill analiza cómo la noción de violencia estructural ha sido tratada en los debates globales sobre justicia transicional y aplica la matriz a un caso de las Zonas de Reserva Campesina en Colombia. Sus resultados sugieren un panorama mixto: mientras que las Zonas de Reserva Campesina garantizan el acceso a la tierra y estimulan el desarrollo rural, aún no ha surgido una transformación sustancial en las estructuras de tenencia y propiedad. De cara al futuro, McGill argumenta que la integración de las Zonas de Reserva Campesina con otras formas de activismo campesino es quizás donde reside el mayor potencial de transformación. El capítulo demuestra cómo la justicia transformadora local y la aplicación cuidadosa de la ley pueden influir en la reducción de la violencia estructural y la transformación de las instituciones.

Los capítulos 3 a 5 proporcionan una serie de comentarios críticos sobre las ideas presentadas por los editores. En el Capítulo 3, Rocío Del Pilar Peña Huertas (Profesora Asistente, Universidad del Rosario, Colombia) reflexiona positivamente sobre el valor de la justicia transformadora en medio del creciente reconocimiento de los límites de los mecanismos de justicia transicional en Colombia. Indica cómo tales discusiones crean nuevas oportunidades para investigar problemas sociales, cómo se diseñan las instituciones y cómo se evalúan las políticas públicas que impactan en el campo. Rocío Del Pilar Peña Huertas destaca, sin embargo, la necesidad de que los investigadores desarrollen más el repertorio actual de herramientas metodológicas para la evaluación de políticas públicas y violencia estructural.

En el Capítulo 4, Irene Vélez-Torres (Ministra de Minas y Energía del Gobierno de Colombia) ofrece algunas reflexiones sobre el valor de la perspectiva ambiental en la justicia transformadora. Ella argumenta que esta perspectiva es necesaria tanto para producir una visión integral y sostenible de la justicia rural como para responder a las crisis socioecológicas locales y globales de manera más amplia. La justicia transformadora, ella sugiere, debe figurar como un componente dentro de las respuestas transdisciplinarias y multiescalares a las crisis socioecológicas que pueden “contribuir decisivamente a la paz y el bienestar de las personas”.

En el capítulo 5, Diana Marcela Muriel Forero (activista, feminista y abogada de la Comisión Colombiana de Juristas) comenta varios temas cruciales: la estrategia teórico de la justicia transformadora y la justicia restaurativa, los criterios generales específicos de la justicia transformadora, las particularidades de justicia transformativa en el contexto colombiano y metodologías propuestas. Argumenta que la justicia transformadora no debe perder de vista la realidad colonial de Colombia y que abordar la violencia estructural requiere “retroceder en la historia para desenmascarar el germen de la colonización y el patriarcado” que va más allá del análisis materialista. La justicia transformadora, ella sugiere, aborda más que “la pobreza o la falta de desarrollo”.

La justicia transformadora es una agenda relativamente nueva, y gran parte de la discusión sobre el tema aún reside en las instituciones académicas del Norte Global. Este volumen, que surge a través de la serie de seminarios 'Nuevas Tendencias en Derecho Internacional' de la Universidad Santo Tomás, representa uno de los primeros con investigadores y profesionales colombianos que busca contextualizar y discutir la justicia transformadora en relación con las cuestiones agrarias, la tierra y la desigualdad en Colombia - un tema que muchos donantes de justicia transicional del Norte Global no financiarán (agradecemos a Ruben Carranza por esta observación). Los capítulos subrayan el valor de tales discusiones para el contexto colombiano, como lo plantea María Isabel Cuartas Giraldo (Universidad Santo Tomás) en su resumen del volumen: como una invitación a trascender los límites legales, institucionales y temporales de la justicia transicional y de proponer pasos concretos hacia la práctica social de la justicia transformadora en este escenario, donde la participación y los espacios de movilización rural enfrentan múltiples desafíos.

Contact us

Interdisciplinary Global Development Centre

igdc@york.ac.uk
01904 323716
Department of Politics and International Relations, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, UK
X

Contact us

Interdisciplinary Global Development Centre

igdc@york.ac.uk
01904 323716
Department of Politics and International Relations, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, UK
X