Reparative Reading at 21

Tuesday 14 February 2017, 1.00PM6pm

The fourth in the department's series of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick Memorial Symposia, Reparative Reading at 21 returns to consider Sedgwick's seminal 1996 essay, 'Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading, or, You're So Paranoid You Probably Think This Essay is About You'. The symposia will take place in the Treehouse of the Berwick Saul Building, between 1pm and 6pm, and will feature short position papers from a number of speakers, followed by a round table discussion. Confirmed speakers include:

  • Angus Brown (University of Birmingham)
  • Tyler Curtain (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
  • Jason Edwards (University of York)
  • Kathryn R. Kent (Williams College)
  • Heather Love (University of Pennsylvania)
  • Ben Nichols (King's, London), and
  • Monica Pearl (Manchester University).

To prepare for the discussion, there will be two informal reading groups, each taking place between 5 and 630pm, in BS/007, on Tuesday January 31 and Tuesday February 7th, that will each consider a pair of landmark essays that have sought to change the way that reading happens across the humanities, social sciences and beyond. 

Starting with Sedgwick’s paradigm-shifting account of paranoid and reparative reading, and moving through Bruno Latour’s polemical argument that critique has been co-opted and run out of steam, we move to Sharon Marcus and Stephen Best’s conceptualisation of surface reading, and Heather Love’s claim for the virtues of description; articles which each, in their different but related ways, seek to challenge the received wisdom of the hermeneutics of suspicion and depth.

 

Location: Treehouse, Berrick Saul Building

Reparative Reading at 21: informal reading group 1

Tuesday 31 January 2017, 6.30PM

Starting with Sedgwick’s paradigm-shifting account of paranoid and reparative reading, and moving through Bruno Latour’s polemical argument that critique has been co-opted and run out of steam.

 

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick

‘Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading, or,

You’re So Paranoid You Probably Think This Essay Is About You’ (1995).

 

and

 

Bruno Latour

 ‘Why Critique Has Run Out of Steam?

From Matters of Fact to Matters of Concern’ (2004).

(http://www.bruno-latour.fr/sites/default/files/89-CRITICAL-INQUIRY-GB.pdf)

Location: BS/007

Reparative Reading at 21: informal reading group 2

Tuesday 7 February 2017, 5.00PM

 Sharon Marcus and Stephen Best’s conceptualisation of surface reading, and Heather Love’s claim for the virtues of description; articles which each, in their different but related ways, seek to challenge the received wisdom of the hermeneutics of suspicion and depth.

 

Stephen Best and Sharon Marcus

‘Surface Reading:

An Introduction’ (2009).

(http://sydney.edu.au/arts/slam/downloads/documents/novel_studies/2_Best_Marcus.pdf)

 

And

 

Heather Love

‘Close But Not Deep:

Literary Ethics and the Descriptive Turn’ (2010).

(http://sydney.edu.au/arts/slam/downloads/documents/novel_studies/5_Love.pdf)

Location: BS/007