Accessibility statement

Emma Marshall

Thesis

Thesis

Social Dynamics and the Management of Sickness and Healthcare in Elite English Families, c.1620-1750

Supervisor: Dr Mark Jenner

Research

Research

My research explores how experiences, practices and discourses of sickness and healthcare intersected with individual and familial identity, power dynamics, order and negotiations of authority within gentry households. Primarily based on personal correspondence, alongside household accounts, medical recipe books and autobiographical writing, my thesis argues that quotidian healthcare activities shaped and were shaped by unique interpersonal relationships and micro-politics within families and their communities. This project is funded by the Wolfson Foundation and grew out of my two previous dissertations. My undergraduate thesis, completed at Durham University, examined laywomen’s medical knowledge, while my Master’s dissertation at York focused on marital conflict in the seventeenth-century church courts. My wider research interests include gender, marriage, domestic life, medicine and the body, and the social history of early modern England more generally.

Papers and publications

Papers

  • "Recipes for Success: how women shared medical knowledge in the seventeenth century ", History Today; Vol. 68, Issue 4, April 2018
  • “Social Dynamics and the Management of Sickness and Healthcare in Elite English Families, c.1650-1750”, Northern Early Modern Network Virtual Conference, hosted by University of Edinburgh (26th November 2020)
  • “Siblings, Sickness and Healthcare in English Gentry Families, c.1650-1750”, Cabinet of Curiosities Virtual Colloquium, University of York (29th October 2020)
  • “Social Dynamics and the Management of Sickness and Healthcare in Elite English Families, c.1650-1750”, Annual Postgraduate Research Conference, University of York’s History Department (2nd October 2020)
  • “People, Place and Power: Re-Evaluating Domestic Healthcare”, 'Reconsidering Illness and Recovery' Virtual Conference (19th August 2020)
  • “Bonds and Boundaries: Familial Separation During Sickness, c.1680-1750”, ‘Distance’ Virtual Conference, hosted by University of York’s Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies and the University of Melbourne's Enlightenment Romanticism Contemporary Culture Research Unit (August 2020)

Blogpost

"Abigail Harley and Brampton Bryan: making a medical commonwealth", Early Modern Medicine (June 2020)

 

External activities

External activities

  • Wolfson Foundation Postgraduate Scholarship in the Humanities, 2019-2022
  • Undergraduate Dissertation of the Year, 2016 (awarded by The Royal Historical Society and History Today at the Longman-History Today Awards, 2017)
  • Social Secretary of the CREMS Postgraduate Forum, the Cabinet of Curiosities (2020-21)
  • Speaker on “Health and Power in the Past”, Warwick Postgraduate History Podcast Series (released 29th May 2020)

Contact details

Emma Marshall
PhD student
Department of History
University of York
Heslington
York
YO10 5DD