CGHH PhD Student Sarah Hartley presents at two international conferences.

Posted on 20 September 2016

Sarah Hartley, a PhD student at the Centre for Global Health Histories, has recently presented at two international conferences in September, related to her current research.

Sarah Hartley reports on her recent papers at two international conferences this September. These were the British International History Group 28th Annual Conference, hosted by the University of Edinburgh; and the British Society for the History of Science’s conference “Science and Islands in the Indo-Pacific World,” which was hosted by the University of Cambridge.

Sarah is a current CGHH PhD student working on nutrition programmes in the South Pacific Region, with a particular focus on Fiji, in the post-war era. She is interested in collaborations between WPRO and/or FAO with colonial and/or regional health and/or development agencies and women's and/or Christian organisations in the South Pacific islands. This involves tracing how their conflicting and converging ideas of gender, race, security and governance impacted the design and delivery of programmes which sought to tackle maternal and child malnutrition.

At the British International History Group 28th Annual Conference, held 8 - 10 September 2016 at the University of Edinburgh, Sarah discussed the role of Britain as a colonial power in the establishment of the Western Pacific Regional Office of the World Health Organisation. The Annual Conference of the British International History Group brings together International Historians from a variety of backgrounds and offers them the opportunity to exchange views.

Sarah also spoke at the BSHS conference “Science and Islands in the Indo-Pacific World,” held 15-16 September 2016 at the University of Cambridge. At this event Sarah presented a paper on the Politics of Family Planning Campaigns in Colonial Fiji, 1945-1970. The BSHS is Britain’s largest learned society devoted to the history of science, technology and medicine, which aims to bring together people with interests in all aspects of the field, and to publicise relevant ideas within the wider research and teaching communities and the media.

CGHH hopes that Sarah found these conference rewarding. Further information about Sarah’s work, and other CGHH PhD students, is available here.