Global Health Histories Public Lectures 2013

Posted on 27 September 2013

A series of free public lectures hosted by the Centre for Global Health Histories.

The Centre for Global Health Histories is pleased to announce a new public lecture series for Autumn 2013, featuring five lectures by world-leading historians of medicine. The events are free and open to all, and each one will be held in the Berrick Saul Building at the University of York’s Heslington West Campus.

CGHH public lecture series poster

Tuesday 15 October

'Patrick Manson and Ronald Ross: malaria and the rise and fall of a scientific friendship’.

William Bynum (Emeritus Professor of the History of Medicine, University College London) examines the rise and fall of Manson and Ross' scientific friendship. This event also celebrates the inauguration of the William Bynum Prize, an international essay competition for doctoral students and early career post-doctoral researchers. Held in the Bowland Auditorium, Berrick Saul Building, at 6pm.

Wednesday 30 October

'Infant Mortality and the transformation of the sanitary system: Chile in the 1930s and in 1964–73'

Professor Claudio Llanos (Instituto de Historia, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile) explores infant mortality and the transformation of the sanitary system in Chile, considering two moments that were rich in social projects and discussions. Held in the Treehouse, Berrick Saul Building, at 5.15pm.

Tuesday 12 November

'India and Global Tuberculosis Control 1910-1975'

Dr Niels Brimnes (Aarhus University, Denmark) narrates the development of tuberculosis control in India, relates it to international organisations and global development trends, and asks how it relates to the attempts to build a modern Indian society. Held in the Bowland Auditorium, Berrick Saul Building, at 6pm.

Tuesday 26 November

‘Crocodiles, tigers and bacilli: Exoticism and bacteriology around 1900’

Professor Christoph Gradmann (University of Oslo, Norway) explores the idea that thinking about tropical flora and fauna played an interesting role in the work of the German medical bacteriologist Robert Koch (1843-1910). Held in the Bowland Auditorium, Berrick Saul Building, at 6pm.

Tuesday 3 December

‘Connecting chronologies: Constructing anthropology and legitimising Empire in late 18th-century South Asia’

Professor Kapil Raj (École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris) shows that far from seeking to ‘other’ non-Europeans, unanimously acclaimed pioneer of orientalism William Jones’ primary aim was to look for a fundamental historical commonality amongst Europeans and certain Asiatic peoples. Held in the Bowland Auditorium, Berrick Saul Building, at 6pm.

Abstracts and further information about each of lecture is available via the Centre for Global Health Histories’ Events page, and via the University of York’s Public Lectures page. The lectures are presented in association with the Yorkshire Philosophical Society and the York Medical Society. The Centre for Global Health Histories would also like to acknowledge the generous support of the Wellcome Trust.

Event image displayed on poster: WHO/Peter Larsen