Strengthening Universal Health Coverage for the fight against Anti-Microbial Resistance

Posted on 3 October 2017

Recordings now available for the 102nd instalment of the popular Global Health Histories series

The 102nd Global Health Histories seminar was held on 7 September, and the series continued its global journey with an event in Colombo, Sri Lanka. The seminar traced the inter-connections between reform in Universal Health Coverage and Sri Lanka’s role in expanding the United Nations and the World Health Organization. The seminar was envisaged as the first step towards a broad- ranging coalition founded on the basis that Sri Lanka has an important global role to play in strengthening Universal Health Coverage, and combating anti-microbial resistance (AMR).

Video recordings of the morning's presentations are now available on CGHH's YouTube page as a dedicated playlist. You can also access the event literature via GHH 102 Seminar Abstracts (PDF , 662kb).

Panelists considered the challenges facing the provision of high quality, free healthcare to all; the financial, political and health challenges posed by AMR; and the need for novel health financing strategies to change pharmaceutical and antibiotics supply and usage. The event featured contributions from: Prof. Sanjoy Bhattacharya, Professor in the History of Medicine and Director, Centre for Global Health Histories (CGHH), University of York; Dr Lakshmi Somatunga, Deputy Director General, Medical Services(I), Ministry of Health; Dr. Dr. Dilantha Dharmagunawardene, Education, Training and Research Unit, Ministry of Health, Sri Lanka; Dr. Suranga Dolamulla, Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow, University of York, Director/ Tertiary care Services, Ministry of Health; Dr. Kushlani Jayatilleke, Consultant Microbiologist, Sri Jayewardenapura General Hospital, Sri Lanka; Dr. BVSH Beneragama, Deputy Director General/ Laboratory Services, Ministry of Health & Dr. Anil Jasinghe, Deputy Director General, National Hospital of Sri Lanka.

GHH 102 Group Photo

Following the Global Health Histories semianr, the afternoon session comprised a training seminar led by Sanjoy Bhattacharya. You can read about the activities and rationale of this session on the companion news item.

All at CGHH would like to extend a heartfelt thanks to everyone who helped to make this event a success, including College of Medical Administrators of Sri Lanka, the WHO Regional Office for Europe, The University of York's Department of History, and the Wellcome Trust