Information for staff

From 31 December 2020, the transition period for the UK leaving the EU completes. We understand that this may have been a worrying or uncertain time for you, and we want to make sure that you have all the information you need on what happens next.

After 31 December 2020 freedom of movement between the UK and the EU ends, and EU, EEA or Swiss citizens need permission to live, work and study in the UK. If this affects you, there are three routes you need to know about:

  • Irish citizens’ status will continue to be protected as part of Common Travel Area arrangements and therefore will not require permission to come to the UK.

What do I need to know about the EU Settlement Scheme?

The EU Settlement Scheme is a fast-track registration process being introduced for EU citizens who want to stay in the UK after Brexit.

  • You need to be in residence in the UK by 31 December at 23:00 to apply for pre-settled status. You have up until 30 June 2021 to complete your application and get either settled or pre-settled status. 
  • It’s free to apply to the scheme. 
  • You can speak to your line manager or email hr-enquiries@york.ac.uk for advice and guidance if you need support. 
  • We also have relocation guidance for eligible employees.
  • Throughout 2019 and 2020 we ran a number of sessions, supported by York City Council and the Citizen Advice Bureau, to help our EU colleagues apply for settled status. Look out for further sessions with Citizens Advice in early 2021, ahead of the 30 June deadline.

The application includes scanning documents and uploading your photo using the government's EU Exit: ID Document Check app. This app is accessible on an android phone or an iphone 7 or above. The University has compatible devices available to borrow, if required. You can arrange to borrow a device by emailing arthur.clune@york.ac.uk. (Devices will be cleaned between uses, in line with Covid-19 precautions.) 

If you're looking for further support, a good place to start is the EU Settlement Scheme Government guidance 

If you're planning to arrive in the UK after the 31 December deadline, find out about The UK’s points-based immigration system: information for EU citizens

If Covid-19 has caused interruptions to your travel plans and your access to appropriate records is limited please see the current government guidance to help.

You may be able to use an alternative piece of evidence of identity and nationality, or (if you are applying from outside the UK) of entitlement to apply from outside the UK if you are unable to obtain or produce a passport or national identity card due to circumstances beyond your control or due to compelling practical or compassionate reasons specifically related to coronavirus public health restrictions.

If Covid-19 has caused interruptions to your travel plans and thus your residence in the UK, for example, you were suffering from Covid-19 overseas and could not return to the UK, or travel restrictions imposed by governments meant you were absent from the UK for longer than planned then, providing you have not been absent for more than 12 months, your continuous qualifying period will not necessarily be affected.
 
If you have been absent from the UK for a single period of more than 6 months, but not more than 12 months, during your 5 year continuous qualifying period due to being ill with Covid-19, and you were unable to return to the UK because you were ill or in quarantine, that absence will not cause you to break your continuous qualifying period. This is because the EUSS allows for a single absence up to 12 months for an important reason, including serious illness.
 
In all cases where you have been prevented from travelling due to Covid-19 you should provide all supporting evidence with your application outlining the details and the dates if you were ill or were in quarantine.
 
Where there is no public health element preventing your return, it will be considered that there is nothing preventing EEA citizens and their family members from returning to the UK and the decision not to do so would be a personal one, the consequences of which may be that continuity of residence and continuous qualifying period is broken.  

Find out more about the government guidance.

The HR Compliance team can help with support or queries regarding your ability to live and work in the UK - contact them at hr-compliance@york.ac.uk

What else do I need to know about changes at the University?

The University will not be undertaking any additional right to work checks for new starters or existing members of staff unless the existing guidance changes and we are required to do so by The Home Office. 

EU staff that have not applied for pre-settled status or secured permission to work under the relevant visa route by 30 June 2021 will no longer have the right to work or rent in the UK and may struggle obtaining access to healthcare. 

Are you a recruiting manager?

Find out how leaving the EU affects recruitment at the University. 

How does leaving the EU affect business travel?

If you’re travelling to the EU on business, you need to make sure you’re compliant with the new guidelines. 

How does leaving the EU affect the way we buy goods, services and equipment?

Find out more about the latest changes to our procurement processes.

Join the EU staff forum

The EU Staff Forum is a space for informal peer support for colleagues from EU/EEA countries from across the University. Informal meetings are based on conversations around shared experiences. Forum co-ordinator Jen Brown liaises with central University services on matters of importance raised by the group. The Forum also functions as the main means of communication between the University and EU/EEA citizen colleagues. 

EU Staff Forum meetings are advertised in the Staff Digest and open to all EU/EEA citizen staff. Currently, meetings are being held on Zoom. 

Contact Jen Brown at jennifer.brown@york.ac.uk for more information, or to join the EU Staff group or mailing list.