Emilie Morin

Profile

Biography

I joined the Department in 2008. I teach undergraduate and postgraduate courses on British, Irish, American and European literatures; the research-led modules I teach include an advanced third-year module on Samuel Beckett, a second-year world literature module on the European avant-garde, and an MA option on political theatre. I work on modern British and Irish literature, theatre history, sound studies, media history, European modernism and the avant-garde. I have published widely in these fields; my essays have appeared in a range of journals including Modernism/modernity, Textual Practice and the Journal of Modern Literature. The books I have published include Beckett’s Political Imagination (Cambridge University Press, 2017), Samuel Beckett and the Problem of Irishness (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), Theatre and Human Rights after 1945: Things Unspeakable (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015) and Theatre and Ghosts: Materiality, Performance and Modernity (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014). 

 

Research

Overview

My research areas are modern British and Irish literature, theatre history, sound studies, media history, European modernism and the avant-garde. I have published widely in these fields; my essays have appeared in a range of journals including Modernism/modernity, Textual Practice and the Journal of Modern Literature. I have a long-standing interest in radio and sound studies and am currently working on a transnational history of radiophonic forms. I am also researching the intersections between avant-garde aesthetics, progressive politics and the development of rights discourses during the 1930s and 1940s.

The books I have previously published include Beckett’s Political Imagination (Cambridge University Press, 2017), Samuel Beckett and the Problem of Irishness (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), and the co-edited collections Theatre and Human Rights after 1945: Things Unspeakable(Palgrave Macmillan, 2015) and Theatre and Ghosts: Materiality, Performance and Modernity (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014). I have also co-edited special journal issues for SubStance, International Yeats Studies and Samuel Beckett Today/Aujourd’hui. With Lauren Arrington (Liverpool), I am Series Editor for the Clemson University Press series ‘Modernist Constellations’.

My most recent book, Beckett’s Political Imagination, challenges the ways in which Samuel Beckett – commonly understood as the perfect example of the apolitical artist – has been perceived. The book uncovers Beckett’s secretive political engagements and lifelong interest in political thought and political history. It discusses the many political causes that framed his writing, commitments, collaborations and friendships, from the Scottsboro Boys to the Black Panthers, from Irish communism to Spanish republicanism to Algerian nationalism, and from campaigns against Irish and British censorship to anti-apartheid and international human rights movements. The book was nominated as one of the 2017 Times Literary Supplement Books of the Year. It has been reviewed in a wide range of academic and trade publications, including The New York Review of Books, Books Ireland, the Dublin Review of Books, the Swedish newspapers Svenska Dagbladet and Dagens Nyheter, and the Polish magazine Dialog.

Supervision

I welcome enquiries from prospective PhD applicants interested in working on modern and contemporary British and Irish literature, theatre history, literature and modern political history, European modernism, the avant-garde, and any other facet of modern literary studies related to my research specialisms.

The PhD theses recently completed under my supervision have dealt with diverse modern and contemporary topics: ‘Salome’s Dance: Literature and the Choreographic Imagination from Wilde to Beckett’ (Megan Girdwood, 2018); ‘“The Means to Put an End to Things”: Samuel Beckett and the Weight of Interpretation’ (Nicholas Wolterman, 2016); ‘Housing in Minor London Cinema, 1958-1974’ (Jay James May, 2015); ‘“One Glimpse and Vanished”: The Limits of Representation in Samuel Beckett’s Criticism and Fiction’ (Tim Lawrence, 2015). My current PhD students are working on modern European theatre and World War I soldiers’ songs and on J. G. Ballard and landscape. I enjoy interdisciplinary research and act as Thesis Advisory Panel member for doctoral students beyond my Department.

Contact details

Dr Emilie Morin
Department of English and Related Literature
University of York
Heslington
York
Y010 5DD

Tel: 44 1904 324219
Fax: 44 1904 323372

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