York engineer takes her research to Parliament

Posted on 4 March 2016

Amelia Gully, 27, a PhD student at University of York, hailing from Ryde, Isle of Wight, is attending Parliament to present her engineering research to a range of politicians and a panel of expert judges, as part of SET for Britain on Monday 7 March.

Amelia’s poster on research into vocal tract modelling will be judged against dozens of other scientists’ and engineers’ research in the only national competition of its kind.

Amelia was shortlisted from hundreds of applicants to appear in Parliament.

On presenting her research in Parliament, she said, “This event is an excellent opportunity to highlight the importance of my research into voice synthesis and its potential to improve lives. I am also looking forward to finding out more about how my work can contribute to the broad range of research being done right now in the UK.”

Professor Dame Ann Dowling OM DBE FREng FRS, President of the Royal Academy of Engineering, said “I’m delighted that so many engineers will be attending Parliament as part of SET for Britain.
 
“Engineers make a difference in all our lives. They create solutions to the issues we face as individuals and as a society. SET for Britain provides a great opportunity for these innovators to connect with the decision makers in Parliament, to showcase the superb engineering research  being carried out in the UK, and the new technologies that can help improve our lives and drive new growth in our industries.
 
“From new materials that ensure safe drinking water to novel uses of 3D printing for efficient energy storage, the research exhibited at SET for Britain provides a glimpse of the talent at work in the UK today. We need many more young people to be inspired to take up an engineering career and follow in these footsteps. I hope the MPs and Peers who meet the engineers are inspired by what they see, and I am sure they will join me in congratulating all the exhibitors on their excellent work.”

Stephen Metcalfe MP, Chairman of the Parliamentary and Scientific Committee, said:

“This annual competition is an important date in the parliamentary calendar because it gives MPs an opportunity to speak to a wide range of the country’s best young researchers.
 
“These early career engineers, mathematicians and scientists are the architects of our future and SET for Britain is politicians’ best opportunity to meet them and understand their work.”

Amelia’s research has been entered into the Engineering session of the competition, which will end in a gold, silver and bronze prize-giving ceremony.

Judged by leading academics, the gold medalist receives £3,000, while silver and bronze receive £2,000 and £1,000 respectively.

The Parliamentary and Scientific Committee runs the event in collaboration with the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society of Biology, The Physiological Society and the Council for Mathematical Sciences, with financial support from Essar, the Clay Mathematics Institute, Warwick Manufacturing Group (WMG), the Institute of Biomedical Science, the Bank of England and the Society of Chemical Industry.

Contact

For further information about the event, images, or interview opportunities, please contact Aaron Boardley at the Royal Academy of Engineering
T: 020 7766 0655.
E: aaron.boardley@raeng.org.uk

SET for Britain

SET for Britain is a poster competition in the House of Commons - involving approximately 210 early stage or early career researchers - judged by professional and academic experts.  All presenters are entered into either the engineering, the biological and biomedical sciences, the physical sciences (chemistry), the physical sciences (physics) session, or the mathematics session, depending on the researcher’s specialism.  

Each session will result in the award of Bronze, Silver and Gold certificates.  Bronze winners will receive a £1,000 prize; Silver, £2,000; and Gold, £3,000 and a medal.  There will also be an overall winner from the four sessions who will receive the Westminster Wharton Medal.

SET for Britain was established by Dr Eric Wharton in 1997.  Following his untimely death in 2007, the Parliamentary and Scientific Committee, with support from the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society of Biology, The Physiological Society and the Council for Mathematical Sciences, is working to further his legacy.  

The event is made possible this year by the prize sponsors, who are Essar, the Clay Mathematics Institute, Warwick Manufacturing Group (WMG), the Institute of Biomedical Science, the Bank of England and the Society of Chemical Industry.

The competition is open to early stage or early career researchers, which includes university research students, postgraduates, research assistants, postdocs, research fellows, newly-appointed lecturers, part-time and mature students, returners, those people embarking on a second career, and their equivalent in national, public sector and industrial laboratories, and appropriate final year undergraduate and MSc students, all of whom are engaged in scientific, engineering, technological or medical research.



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