Platform presentations

o   Interactions between pesticides and microorganisms

o   Micro-scale processes in soil and water

o   Emissions and fate of pesticides in air

o   Innovative approaches in mathematical modelling

o   Mechanisms and routes of transport of pesticides at field scale

o   Pesticides in developing countries

o   Advances in design and use of pesticide monitoring campaigns

o   Managing environmental impacts of pesticides

Poster presentations

o   Interactions between pesticides and microorganisms

o   Micro-scale processes in soil and water

o   Emissions and fate of pesticides in air

o   Innovative approaches in mathematical modelling A

o   Innovative approaches in mathematical modelling B

o   Advances in design and use of pesticide monitoring campaigns

o   Mechanisms and routes of transport of pesticides at field scale

o   Pesticides in developing countries

o   Managing environmental impacts of pesticides

 

Monday 2 September

Interactions between pesticides and microorganisms

Chair Gary Bending

13:10 Phototrophic Microorganisms: A Potent Biodegrading Community Whose Contribution to Pesticide Fate is Currently Overlooked; Laurence Hand; Syngenta; UK

                                                                                                              

13:30 Microbiomics, metabolomics and mobilomics suggest a high level of genetic adaptation towards pesticide biodegradation in on farm biopurification systems; Dirk Springael; KU Leuven; Belgium

                                                                                                                    

13:50 Non UV light influences the rate of crop protection degradation in soil; Lawrence O Davies; University of Warwick; UK

14:10 Pesticide mineralization in sand filter material taken from drinking water production facilities; Johanna Vandermaesen; KU Leuven; Belgium

14:30 Fate of realistic maize herbicide mixtures and impacts on soil microbial communities; Pierre Joly; Clermont Université; France

Micro-scale processes in soil and water

Chair Christopher Leake

15:20 Impact of distribution heterogeneity of microorganisms and 2,4-D on biodegradation processes in soil: experiment and modelling; Marc Pinheiro; INRA-AgroParisTech; France

 

15:40 Does preserving soil structure combined with on-demand moisture maintenance enhance degradation rates of Plant Protection Products?; Christine Dougan; Syngenta; UK

16:00 The fate of pesticides in soil and aquifers taking a small-scale view: Does spatial heterogeneity in degradation potentials have an impact?; Jens Aamand; Geological Survey of Denmark & Greenland (GEUS); Denmark

16:20             Experimental determination of Plant uptake factors (PUFs) for three different crops as a function of logKow and pH in a hydroponic like test system under greenhouse conditions; Gunnar Fent; RLP AgroScience; Germany

16:40 Fate of nanopesticides in soil; Melanie Kah; University of Vienna; Austria

Tuesday 3 September

Emissions and fate of pesticides in air

Chair Carole Bedos

08:30 Volatilization of pesticides from the bare soil surface- Modelling of the Humidity effect; Kai-Uwe Goss; Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research GmbH - UFZ; Germany

08:50 Development and validation of a mechanistic pesticide emission model at the field scale: toward a tool for evaluating the sources of atmospheric contamination by pesticides; Nebila Lichiheb; INRA-AgroParisTech; France

09:10 Overview of the use of the outdoor simulation chamber EUPHORE for studying the atmospheric fate of organophosphorous insecticides and chloroacetanilide and dinitroaniline herbicides; Amalia Muńoz; Fundación CEAM; Spain

09:30 Exposure of workers, residents and bystanders to vapour plant protection products after application to crops; Erik van den Berg; Alterra, Wageningen UR; Netherlands

09:50 Atmospheric transport and deposition of pesticides in Sweden; Jenny Kreuger; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU); Sweden

Innovative approaches in mathematical modelling

Chairs : Sabine Beulke, Mick Whelan

10:40 Prediction of drainage periods and drainage outflow; Vladimir Kuzmanovski; Jozef Stefan Institute; Slovenia

11:00 Modelling pesticide exposure at the water table using a parsimonious process-based model; Stephanie Pullan; Cranfield University; UK

11:20 Modelling the Path to Better Soil Applied Pesticides; Paul Sweeney; Syngenta; UK

11:40 Pesticide leaching under climate change: the role of climate input uncertainty; Karin Steffens; Swedish university of agricultural sciences (SLU); Sweden

12:00 Use of time dependent sorption in combination with field degradation half-lives for higher tier leaching assessment; Bernhard Jene; BASF SE; Germany

Mechanisms and routes of transport of pesticides at field scale

Chair Colin Brown

14:20 Factors Affecting the Movement of Pesticides Applied in Residential Settings; Russell Jones; Bayer Crop Science; US

14:40 Comparison of the environmental performances of four maize monocropping systems: a three years monitoring of pesticides leaching; Lionel Alletto; Université de Toulouse; France

15:00 Pesticide pollution in Swiss streams: a synoptic view based on pesticide monitoring data and land use analysis; Ivo Strahm; FOEN, Federal Office for the Environment; Switzerland

15:20 Transport and attenuation of chloroacetanilides at the catchment scale; Marie Lefrancq; University of Strasbourg; France

Pesticides in developing countries

Chair Hans Dobson

16:10 Microbial assisted phytoremediation of chlorinated pesticides in a warming climate: Challenges and perspectives; Purusothaman Chirakkuzhyil Abhilash; Banaras Hindu University; India

16:30 Scenarios to protect drinking water production from Ethiopian surface water and simulations for some hazardous pesticides; Paulien I. Adriaanse; Alterra, Wageningen UR; Netherlands

16:50 Risk assessment for pesticides in areas of high vulnerability of Colombia; Martha Villamizar; University of York; UK

                                      

17:10 Level of organochlorine pesticides in fish species from Lake Awassa in the Ethiopian Rift-Valley (2009–2010) and implications in dietary exposure; Ermias Deribe; Hawassa University; Ethiopia

 

Wednesday 4 September

Advances in design and use of pesticide monitoring campaigns

Chair Ettore Capri

09:00 Spatial analysis of pesticide use in agriculture and emissions to water; Ingeborg Joris; VITO; Belgium

09:20 20 years of long-term atrazine monitoring in a shallow aquifer in western Germany; David Vonberg; Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH; Germany

09:40 A monitoring programme to determine the potential of a herbicide degradate to leach to shallow groundwater in maize growing regions of Europe; Derek Wallace; Syngenta; UK

10:00 Prioritizing pesticides for Swiss surface water monitoring - Theoretical selection method and analytical screening for 240 pesticides; Irene Wittmer; Eawag; Switzerland

10:20 Water monitoring of emerging pesticides in France: Organization of a screening study from prioritization to measurements; Fabrizio G. Botta et al.; INERIS; France

 

Managing environmental impacts of pesticides

Chair Peter Campbell

11:10 The protection of Fontanile, an example of Italian lowland spring; Matteo Balderacchi; Universitŕ Cattolica del Sacro Cuore; Italy

11:30 Adaptation strategies of soil biodiversity (earthworms) to pesticides: physiological mechanisms and soil ecological implications; Nicolas Givaudan; Université Rennes; France

11:50 ECOFUN-MICROBIODIV: an FP7 European project for developing and evaluating innovative tools for assessing the impact of pesticides toxicity on soil microbial diversity and functions; Ines Petric; Institut Rudjer Boskovic, Zagreb; Croatia

12:10 Integrating chemical fate dynamics and population-level effect models for pesticides on a landscape scale; Andreas Focks; Alterra, Wageningen UR; Netherlands

12:30 Costs and effectiveness of IPM-measures to reduce aquatic risks from pesticides in the Netherlands; Martha Van Eerdt; PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency; Netherlands


 

Poster Session A : 2nd September : 17.00-18.30

Interactions between pesticides and microorganisms

1.   Accelerated degradation; identifying the microbial mechanisms responsible; Rachel Yale et al.; University of York; UK

2.   The biotic degradation of metaldehyde; John Thomas et al.; University of York; UK

3.   Isolation of pesticide-degrading bacteria by Most Probable Number (MPN) method using tetrazolium salts; Magalie Stauffert et al.; Clermont Université; France

4.   Biodegradation of sulcotrione herbicide in a Vertic dark soil: impact of pesticide/soil/bacteria interactions; Edith Dumas et al.; Clermont Université; France

5.   Isolation and characterization of edaphic herbicide-degrading fungal strains after exposure to a mixture of herbicides; Magalie Stauffert et al.; Clermont Université; France

6.   Fungal-bacterial consortia increase degradation of the phenylurea herbicide diuron in water-unsaturated systems; Lea Ellegaard-Jensen et al.; Geological Survey of Denmark & Greenland (GEUS); Denmark

7.   Slow degradation of fungicides in soils from cold temperate climate; Marit Almvik et al.; Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research (Bioforsk); Norway

8.   Soil microbial community responses to common pesticides of conventional, IPM and organic farming; Giorgia Pertile et al.; Universitŕ Cattolica del Sacro Cuore; Italy

9.   Genetic and metabolic analysis of the carbofuran degradation pathway in Sphingomonas sp. KN65.2.; Nguyen Thi Phi Oanh et al.; KU Leuven; Belgium

10.       Bentazone mineralization in buffer strip soils adjacent to agricultural soils; Pieter Vandermeeren et al.; KU Leuven; Belgium

11.       Efficiency of a farm biobed in a Mediterranean climate; Alessandra Cardinali et al.; DAFNAE-University of Padua; Italy

12.       Invasion of a sand filter biofilm community by Aminobacter sp. MSH1, a bioaugmentation strategy for the treatment of 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) contaminated drinking water; Benjamin Horemans et al.; KU Leuven; Belgium

13.       Long-term isoproturon and MCPA mineralization capacity in a recently restored wetland; Pieter Vandermeeren et al.; KU Leuven; Belgium

14.       Rapid degradation of pesticides at low concentrations - the possibility of using biodegradation to purify polluted groundwater during sand filtration; Christian Nyrop Albers et al.; Geological Survey of Denmark & Greenland (GEUS); Denmark

15.       Implementation of Surface Water Mineralisation Studies, Conducted According to OECD309, in Agrochemical Regulation; Harriet Moreland and Laurence Hand.; Syngenta; UK

Micro-scale processes in soil and water

16.       APEX (Aqueous Photochemistry of Environmentally-occurring Xenobiotics): A new, freely available software tool to predict the photodegradation kinetics of organic contaminants in surface waters; Davide Vione and Marco Bodrato; University of Turin; Italy

17.       The influence of desorption dynamics on herbicide bioaccessibility; Laura Suddaby et al.; Syngenta; UK

 

18.       Fate and behaviour of acidic herbicides in both fresh and estuarine waters; Fadi Housari et al.; AL Furat University; Syria

19.       Cover crop residues influence herbicides behaviour in soils: the case of S-metolachlor; Cécile Nobile et al.; Université de Toulouse; France

20.       Effect of the organic amendment rate on the immobilization of pesticides in amended vineyard soils; Alba Álvarez-Martín et al.; IRNASA-CSIC; Spain

21.       Adsorption of pesticides applied alone or in mixtures on an agricultural Vertic dark soil; Edith Dumas et al.; Clermont Université; France

22.       Cover crop residues influence herbicides behaviour in soils: the case of glyphosate; Ana Cassigneul et al.; Université de Toulouse; France

23.       Plant Uptake Factor – Theory and a Simple Experimental Procedure; Jackie Webb et al.; Syngenta; UK

24.       Sorption of selected pesticides on soils, sediment and straw from a constructed agricultural drainage ditch or pond; Romain Vallee et al.; LIEC, UMR 7360 CNRS-Université de Lorraine; France

25.       Dissipation and bioavailability of fungicides in a vineyard soil amended with spent mushroom substrate at different rates; Alba Álvarez-Martín et al.; IRNASA-CSIC; Spain

26.       Degradation of mesotrione in amended soils and response of soil microbial communities; Eva Pose-Juan et al.; IRNASA-CSIC; Spain

27.       Transformation of the herbicide fluroxypyr under distinct environmental conditions; Uta Ulrich et al.; University of Kiel; Germany

28.       The effect of (non-UV) light on the biodegradation of Crop Protective products in an OECD-like regulatory system; Mark Day et al.; University of Warwick; UK

Emissions and fate of pesticides in air

29.       Atmospheric levels of currently used pesticides in the atmosphere of a rural site in France; Clara Coscollŕ et al.; Centre for Public Health Research (CSISP-FISABIO); Spain

30.       Application of XAD-2 passive samplers for the evaluation of the atmospheric contamination by pesticides; Céline Liaud et al.; ICPEES (UMR 7515), University of Strasbourg/CNRS; France

31.       Determination of pesticides in vineyard soil and air before, during and after applications; Justine Cruz et al.; Université de Bordeaux; France

32.       Atmospheric degradation of ethalfluraline; Amalia Muńoz et al.; Fundación CEAM; Spain

33.       Particulate matter formation from photochemical degradation of pesticides; E.Borrás et al.; Fundación CEAM; Spain

34.       Chlorothalonil accelerates the photodecomposition of other pesticides exposed to sunlight on wax films; Shirin Monadjemi and Claire Richard; UMR CNRS n°6296; France

35.       Effective mitigation measures to reduce worker exposure via inhalation during shank soil fumigation with chloropicrin; Federico Ferrari et al.; Aeiforia srl, spin off company of Universitŕ Cattolica del Sacro Cuore; Italy

36.       Volatilisation of pesticides: a greenhouse trial; Michael Houbraken et al.; Ghent University; Belgium

37.       A new laboratory system to measure pesticide volatilization and gaseous deposition onto water; Olivier Fanucci et al.; NRA-AgroParisTech; France

38.       Comparison of an outdoor wind tunnel and a laboratory test system for investigating the deposition of pesticides following volatilisation; Gunnar Fent et al.; RLP AgroScience; Germany

39.       Comparison of Long-Range Transport and dry and wet deposition of selected C3 – C6 Chlorinated Organic Compounds on two different climatic regions of Europe; Jose Luis Palau et al.; Fundación CEAM; Spain

Innovative approaches in mathematical modelling A

40.       Modelling drainage with machine learning methods; Vladimir Kuzmanovski et al.; Jozef Stefan Institute; Slovenia

41.       Comparison of 1D and 2D modelling of pesticide transfer in tile-drained context. Application on La Jailličre site; Romain Dairon et al.; National Research Institute of Science and Technology for Environment and Agriculture; France

42.       Wash-off parameterization in FOCUSgw models; Gerald Reinken et al.; Bayer Crop Science; Germany 

43.       Pore scale heterogeneities as cause for differences in pesticide degradation comparing lab and field conditions; Mona Richter et al.; BASF SE, Technische Universität Braunschweig; Germany

44.       Estimators for the median DegT50 from a limited number of lab or field studies; Zhenglei Gao et al.; Tier 3 solutions GmbH; Germany

45.       Evaluation of degradation kinetics of a mobile compound in the field using inverse modelling; Klaus Hammel; Bayer Crop Science; Germany

46.       Integration of a pesticide fate module in the crop model STICS: evaluation on three experimental sites; Wilfried Queyrel et al.; UMR Sisyphe, Mines Paristech / UPMC, EPHE, CNRS; France

47.       PERSAM: a software tool for calculating PECs in soils; Ingeborg Joris et al.; VITO; Belgium

Poster Session B : 3rd September : 12.50-14.20

Innovative approaches in mathematical modelling B

1.            Adapting LISEM to improve modelling of pesticide transport by runoff and erosion; Marie Lefrancq et al.; University of Strasbourg; France

2.            Parameterisation of FOCUS drainage scenarios using PEARL; Erik van den Berg et al.; Alterra, Wageningen UR; Netherlands

3.            Long term surface water simulations using the FOCUS scenarios; Michael Klein; Fraunhofer IME; Germany

4.            Feedback from ANSES on the use of FOCUS Surface Water tools for Southern zonal risk assessment; Emilie Farama et al.; ANSES - French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety; France

5.            Assessing the coverage of surface water exposure via drainage by the FOCUS scenarios in France; Lucas Garcia et al.; BASF SE; Germany

6.            Assessment of the Representativeness of FOCUS Surface Water Scenario D2 in France; Greg Hughes et al.; Cambridge Environmental Assessments;UK

7.            Pesticide metabolite exposure in surface water modelled with TOXSWA; Wim Beltman et al.; Alterra, Wageningen UR; Netherlands

8.            AMPA and glyphosate in the Meuse – a modelling approach to distinguish pollution sources and conversion processes; Nele Desmet et al.; VITO; Belgium

9.            Update of FROGS and adaptation to PEARL 4.4.4 and FOCUS groundwater II guidance; Ludovic Loiseau et al.; Syngenta; UK

10.       Development of PECGW scenarios for tomatoes grown as protected crops in the Southern Zone; Sue Hayes et al.; Syngenta; UK

11.       A new model of pesticide transfers from land to water at the catchment scale; Mick Whelan et al.; University of Leicester; UK

12.       Modelling the fate of pesticides in the Wensum catchment in the UK; Martha Villamizar et al.; University of York; UK

13.       Development and verification of a GIS Layer to identify shallow groundwater regions for monitoring in the EU; Timothy Negley et al.; ARCADIS; US

14.       Field-scale leaching of metribuzin with cold winter climate under conventional cropping practices in Norway, simulated with MACRO, PEARL and PRZM; Gomez-Aledo et al.; INRA-AgroParisTech; France

15.       New tools to support pesticide registration at the national and EU levels; Igor Dubus et al.; Footways; France

16.       Review and evaluation of exposure models in the framework of the 4FUN project; Tineke De Wilde et al.; Arche; Belgium

17.       Integration of Local Conditions in Risk Assessment; Amy Ritter et al.; Waterborne Environmental, Inc.; US

Advances in design and use of pesticide monitoring campaigns

18.       Development of EuroPEARL 2012 to support large-scale exposure assessments and monitoring programs; Gerco Hoogeweg et al.; Waterborne Environmental, Inc.; US

19.       Calibration and field evaluation of passive samplers for monitoring pesticides in water; Lutz Ahrens et al.; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU); Sweden

20.       Temporal evaluation of the pollution by pesticides in natural surface and ground waters in a wine-growing region; Eliseo Herrero-Hernández et al.; IRNASA-CSIC; Spain

21.       Setting groundwater monitoring sites in a European wide spatial context by modelling; Tim Häring et al.; BASF SE; Germany

22.       Occurrence of pesticides in ground waters of the Czech Republic; Vít Kodeš et al.; Czech Hydrometeorological Institute; Czech Republic

23.       Comprehensive Insecticide and Fungicide Monitoring Using Advanced High Resolution Mass Spectrometry; Christoph Moschet et al.; Eawag; Switzerland

24.       Passive sampling – a suitable screening method of pesticides in a water phase; Roman Grabic et al.; University of South Bohemia; Czech Republic

25.       Specific pesticide groundwater vulnerability and contamination risk maps of the Czech Republic; Vít Kodeš et al.; Czech Hydrometeorological Institute; Czech Republic

26.       Webtool for data presentation and analysis of surface water and groundwater monitoring for plant protection products; Nele Smeets et al.; VITO; Belgium

27.       The Swedish environmental monitoring program for pesticides and examples of monitoring data applications; Martin Larsson et al.; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU); Sweden

Mechanisms and routes of transport of pesticides at field scale

28.       Leaching of metabolite CGA108906 demonstrate shortcoming in the EU pesticide authorization procedure; Annette E. Rosenbom et al.; Geological Survey of Denmark & Greenland (GEUS); Denmark

29.       Potato Cropping and pesticide leaching risk; Ole Stig Jacobsen et al.; Geological Survey of Denmark & Greenland (GEUS); Denmark

30.       Glyphosate use and losses in a residential area; Wesley Boënne et al.; VITO; Belgium

31.       Pesticide losses in surface runoff from a clay soil in south east Sweden; Mats Larsbo et al.; Swedish university of agricultural sciences (SLU); Sweden

32.       Surface runoff of pesticides in Sweden – risk assessment and mitigation; Kristin Boye et al.; Centre for Chemical Pesticides (CKB), Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; Sweden

33.       Development of a field methodology for quantifying the efficiency of vegetative buffers in removing  pesticide contained in surface runoff.; Tim Pepper et al.; Cambridge Environmental Assessments (ADAS UK Ltd); UK

34.       Field experiments to measure efficacy of detention ponds to reduce pesticide transfer to surface water; Colin Brown et al.; University of York; UK

35.       Strategies for implementation of sound cereal production methods with low loss of pesticides and phosphorus; Marianne Stenrřd et al.; Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research (Bioforsk); Norway

36.       Determination of Pesticides in Bees and Pollen by Liquid and Gas Chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry; Ove Jonsson et al.; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU); Sweden

37.       Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with Gas Chromatography for Chlorpyrifos and Methyl Parathion analysis; Ghisliane Echeverry et al.; GICAMP, Universidad del Valle; Colombia

Pesticides in developing countries

38.       Health risk assessment of pesticides residue in maize and cowpea from Ejura, Ghana; Godfred Darko et al.; Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology; Ghana

39.       Pesticide use, application and pollution status in India; Purusothaman Chirakkuzhyil Abhilash; Banaras Hindu University; India

40.       Fate of Chlordecone in volcanic tropical soils and water in the French West Indies; Marc Voltz et al.; INRA, UMR LISAH; France

41.       Leaching potential of fenoxaprop-p-ethyl and pendimethaline in silty loam soil; Muhammad Suleman et al.; The University of Agriculture Peshawar; Pakistan

Managing environmental impacts of pesticides

42.       Investigating pesticide photodegradation in plastic-protected growing environments: development of a pesticide action spectrum; Elizabeth Hill et al.; Lancaster University; UK

43.       Comparison of three pesticide fate models for S-metolachlor leaching under field conditions in different maize cropping systems; Jesús M. Marín-Benito et al.; INRA-AgroParisTech; France

44.       A network of long term experimental sites to include quantitative modelling of pesticides losses in the multi-criteria assessment of innovating cropping systems in France; Pierre Benoit et al.; INRA-AgroParisTech; France

45.       Fate and impact of Pesticides: A multi-scale and interdisciplinary study for a rational use; Edith Dumas et al.; Clermont Université; France

              

46.       Evaluation of the Dutch policy plan on sustainable crop protection; Aaldrik Tiktak et al.; PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency; Netherlands

47.       Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ) as an indicator for the sustainability in tomato crops with traditional and GAPs systems; Martha I. Páez et al.; Universidad del Valle; Colombia

48.       Assessment of PBTs in the EU: A critical review and proposed evaluation scheme with reference to plant protection products; Michael Matthies et al.; University of Osnabrueck; Germany

 

Last Updated: October 7, 2013 | Conference Email

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