Research themes

HRDs

Human Rights Defenders at Risk

The situation of human rights defenders at risk is one of CAHR's core areas of research. We focus on: the rights of defenders; the risks they face; their security management practices; their wellbeing; and the evolving international protection regime for their security and rights.

CAHR has supported human rights defenders (HRDs) around the world for over a decade. In 2016 we launched the Human Rights Defender Hub, bringing together our work as a leading provider of temporary relocation, knowledge exchange and research in relation to HRDs. 

Through the Hub, CAHR has an ongoing research collaboration with the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders, Michel Forst. You can read more about our work with the mandate here. Our Working Papers Series publishes recent research on human rights defenders, and we regularly convene workshops and seminars on issues related to human rights defenders.

Wellbeing and Temporary International Relocation Initiatives for human rights defenders

The wellbeing of people promoting and protecting human rights is a critical but often neglected issue in the human rights movement. Cultures of human rights practice tend to value deep commitment and sacrifice, prompting feelings of guilt in relation to 'self-care'. People involved in human rights work often find it difficult to talk about their own mental and emotional wellbeing; the very language used in relation to this topic can produced resistance. People involved in human rights work can have very different ways of approaching wellbeing. It is important that we do not presume that certain methods work for everyone and to recognise that experiences of wellbeing are also gendered.

Aims of the Project

The aim of this project is deepen understanding about (a) the norms, beliefs, and practices that hinder as well as support human rights defenders at risk in strengthening their mental and emotional wellbeing, both individually and collectively; (b) how supporters of human rights defenders can assist those at risk in strengthening their mental and emotional wellbeing; (c) which creative and reflective practices strengthen the mental and emotional wellbeing of defenders at risk, and why.

This project is a collaboration between the Centre for Applied Human Rights at the University of York (CAHR), Justice and Peace Netherlands, the International Cities of Refuge Network (ICORN), The Martin Roth Initiative, and The New School in New York.

Research Projects

CAHR staff are working on two international research projects related to human rights defenders at risk: 

The project Navigating Risk, Managing Security, and Receiving Support, focuses on the experiences of human rights defenders in Colombia, Mexico, Kenya, Egypt, and Indonesia. It explores topics such as the types of risks defenders face and why; factors that make them feel secure and insecure; their security management practices; norms about wellbeing; and perceptions of 'human rights' and 'human rights defenders' in these five countries.

The project Civil Society Networks of Protection, focuses on how formal and informal civil society networks provide protection support to human rights defenders at risk in the East and Horn of Africa. Conducted in partnership with DefendDefenders, the project examines the issues that civil society networks of protection face, and the ways they respond to the challenges involved in supporting defenders at risk.

For more information, go to the research project website.

Protection of Human Rights Defenders

The Centre for Applied Human Rights (CAHR), the Human Rights and Social Justice Research Institute (HRSJ) at London Metropolitan University, and Amnesty International have collaborated on research to inform practice on the protection of human rights defenders. This has led to two Special Issues:

As a human rights defender myself, I welcome this JHRP Special Issue on the protection of defenders. I believe it ably echoes some of the challenges that triggered the establishment of my mandate in 2010 and are still relevant four years later in many parts of the world: namely the shrinking space for civil society to freely express its views and participate in public life. In this regard, the realization of the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association is essential for ensuring a safe and conducive environment for human rights defenders in the pursuance of their legitimate and important activities.

Maina Kiai, UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Association and Assembly

Development

Development and Human Rights

PI in the projects below: Paul Gready

Development Alternatives

This research is part of an exciting partnership between the Centre for Applied Human Rights (CAHR) and ActionAid, a leading development INGO, focusing on rights-based development alternatives. Global poverty levels remain unacceptably high despite decades of aid. Recently adopted Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) open space for alternatives to emerge to the mix of neoliberalism and charity that often characterises development policy. There are many examples of communities doing development in a way that puts more emphasis on locally-informed rights cultures and/or hybrid approaches combining local and global elements. Such alternatives can and should inform the implementation of the SDGs. The documentation and promotion of such alternatives is the aim of this project. The research will take a participatory approach to documenting examples of alternatives and testing whether creative methods, such as storytelling and narrative, can support communities to articulate development alternatives.

Funding for this research has been secured from the following sources:

  • White Rose DTC ESRC Collaborative PhD Studentship involving CAHR and ActionAid (2016-2020).
  • Creative Activism: Art and Development Alternatives (AHRC/GCRF network grant, 2016-18).
  • Pushing Back: Supporting Organisations and Movements in Contexts of Shrinking Civic and Democratic Space (GCRF IAA, 2018-19).

Creative Activism: Art and Development Activism

This project seeks to develop a researcher-activist-practitioner network to explore the ways in which art and creative activism can contribute to efforts to understand and enact development alternatives. Development alternatives is understood to mean the diversity of practice and thinking that offers an alternative to mainstream development approaches (e.g. neo-liberal, service delivery, aid-centred, hierarchical, entrepreneurial), in particular, diverse voices and approaches from the Global South rarely heard in development debates and practice.  
 
In this context, the aims and objectives of this research are innovative in five main ways:

  1. It will be convened by an academic-practitioner partnership between the Centre for Applied Human Rights (CAHR) at the University of York, and the international development agency ActionAid.
  2. The research will bring together artists, academics, activists and development practitioners from the UK, Bangladesh and Uganda.
  3. The network will critically explore how art and creative activism - and specifically the themes of disruption, performance and translation - can articulate development alternatives privileged by those whose voices are often marginalised in development debates, and the extent to which these alternatives complement, enhance or are in tension with the SDGs.
  4. The network will deploy creative methodologies to trigger debate and shape alternatives.
  5. Through ActionAid and local actors, the research will have clear pathways to impact.     

Pushing Back: Supporting Organisations and Movements in Contexts of Shrinking Civic and Democratic Space

An early finding of the development alternatives research is that the imaginative space to think about alternatives is affected by political and civic space – if the latter is under attack, the former suffers too. This project seeks to identify concrete ways of pushing back against shrinking political and civic space. The crack-down on civil society is a global phenomenon, which has dramatically affected the work of development and environmental activists in many parts of the world. Activist and artists in both Bangladesh and Uganda identified it as a pressing priority. Pushing back involves a shift from reactive responses (such as protection facilities for activists), to a proactive identification of solutions and alternatives.

This impact project will collect examples from 9 case study countries of best practice and innovation from activists, organisations and social movements that are pushing back to promote and protect human rights in contexts of shrinking civic space with/or through the support of ActionAid. The case study countries are Bangladesh, Guatemala, Kenya, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Citizenship Futures: Rethinking Citizenship in an Era of Growing Informality

Challenges to citizenship can be located at the intersection of current political and economic crises. Politically, while there have been 'structural' advances in formerly autocratic states in the Global South in the last 25 years (elections, rights under law, discourses of democratic citizenship), of late the idea of democratic citizenship and inclusion has come under increasing threat. New forms of exclusion have emerged around national boundaries and belonging through a revival of racial and ethnic forms of nationalism, mass migration, and more. A disenchantment with formal politics and political parties has led to a rise of populist parties that champion exclusionary visions of citizenship and belonging. Enduring neo-liberal economic policies (decades of structural adjustment) and related policies of privatisation, decentralisation and public-private partnership have created more complex and often weakened forms of governance that complicate and fragment relations of political authority and accountability.

The intersection of these political and economic trends has generated new forms of exclusion, rising inequality, and growing informality - 'grey spaces' that have a complex relationship to state control and regulation, and which can weaken state sovereignty and formal democracy, but also be the source of economic and political innovation that transforms state policy 'from below'. These developments create challenges, as well as possibly opportunities, for citizenship futures.

This project seeks to better understand the relationships between citizenship, rights and informality. The following three themes have been prioritised: Subaltern informality, public authorities and citizenship; Political subjectivities, hope and story-telling at the margins; and Elite informality and inequality.

Culture

Cultures of Human Rights Practice

Principal Investigator: Paul Gready 

This research theme explored interactions between human rights and culture by:

  • Analysing discourses of human rights practice, drawing on cultural theories of representation (narrative, genre, testimony).
  • Examining the role of culture in human rights work – what cultural and forms are used, why, and to what effect e.g. video advocacy, theatre for development?
  • Exploring the ways in which human rights practitioners, artists, writers, musicians, film-makers, etc. collaborate in pursuit of human rights-related goals.

Translating Freedom

This research project focused on translations of freedom in post-conflict settings. As democracy, human rights, revolution, reconciliation or in some other form, translations of freedom are a vital component of internal national debates, external interventions and links between the two, in such settings. Two sectors have been identified as central to such translations.

  1. Human rights and transitional justice.
  2. Public culture, ranging from literature, film and theatre to community arts projects and memorialisation.

As such, translations of freedom are situated at the intersection of institutions and norms on the one hand, and public debate and creativity on the other. Three country case studies were chosen - Egypt, Rwanda, and South Africa. They were at different points beyond or 'post' conflict, and enable a comparison between the aftermaths of authoritarianism (Egypt, South Africa) and the aftermaths of conflict (Rwanda).

Research workshops were held in Rwanda, South Africa and Egypt in 2012, followed by a final workshop in York in July 2013. All workshop reports are available below.

Translating Freedom York final workshop report (PDF , 624kb)

Translating Freedom Egypt workshop report (PDF , 337kb)

Translating Freedom South Africa workshop report (PDF , 598kb)

Translating Freedom Rwanda workshop report (PDF , 543kb)

This research was funded by an AHRC network grant.

Image: Institute for the Public Understanding of the Past (IPUP)

Responsibility to the Story

Human rights research has grown exponentially in the academy over the past decade in a range of disciplines (law, politics, anthropology, literature). Cultural output ranging from child soldier autobiographies to documentary films about transitional justice is similarly prominent.

Practitioner research has had to adapt to its own forms of expansion (use of new media such as the internet). The use and the study of testimony have been a driving force behind these developments. But the ethical implications of the rise of testimony and testimonial research are under-explored. In this context, the project aim was to investigate what responsibility researchers, practitioners and artists have to the stories they use.

The research drew on a collaborative partnership with Amnesty International, the Medical Foundation for the Care of Victims of Torture, and PANOS London. For further details see the programme of the “Responsibility to the Story” conference; and the special issue of the Journal of Human Rights Practice (2/2, 2010).

 

Image: Statement 710399 poster, Refik Hodzic, XY Films

Transitional justice

Transitional Justice

Over the past 20 years, there has been a proliferation of 'transitional justice' mechanisms (primarily criminal tribunals and truth commissions) to provide accountability and redress after state violence and civil war. The Centre has one research project on transitional justice, led by Paul Gready.

Transformative Justice

Principal Investigator: Paul Gready 

Transitional justice has been critiqued for treating the symptoms rather than the causes of conflict. CAHR has helped spearhead an international research network on 'transformative justice' which examines how to transform the structural inequalities that are among the causes and consequences of violence and conflict. More information about the network is available here

This research project was initially funded by the Worldwide Universities Network and the White Rose Universities. The project included 3 White Rose ESRC PhD studentships on transformative justice at CAHR, University of Leeds, and University of Sheffield.

Transformative Justice in Egypt and Tunisia

A three-year research project on Transformative Justice in Tunisia and Egypt (PDF , 80kb) began in January 2014. It was led by CAHR staff members Paul Gready (Principal Investigator) and Simon Robins (Senior Researcher). In collaboration with the American University in Cairo and a number of other local partners in Egypt and Tunisia interviews were conducted with diverse sectors of society and in different parts of each county on agendas and strategies for transformative change. In Egypt the focus was on the potential for transformation without transition, while in Tunisia the research explored whether transition and transitional justice can provide a platform for transformation.

An ESRC IAA grant funded collaboration with the Women's Commission of the Tunisian Truth and Dignity Commission (TDC). Tunisia is attempting to address a legacy of rights violations committed under the previous regime, including sexual and gender-based violence against women in detention. CAHR worked with the Women's Commission to research the violations experienced by former detainees and their current needs. This project sought to conduct research to: 1) Go beyond violations and needs to secure insights into locally-relevant reparations, and particularly transformative reparations. 2) To work with the Women's Commission to provide support in drafting its section of the TDC's final report, and associated recommendations. 3) To engage civil society actors, donors and relevant government agencies to build support for the recommendations and their implementation.

A Transitional Justice Barometer: Measuring the Needs for and Impact of Transitional Justice Processes in Tunisia

The two-year research project on participatory transitional justice process in Tunisia built research capacity in Tunisia that enabled Tunisians from a wide range of backgrounds to articulate their aspirations for the transition to the authorities and increase their participation in transitional justice processes. The project built and trained a research unit within a Tunisian NGO, Al Kawakibi Democracy Transition Center (KADEM), using the expertise of CAHR and Impunity Watch. It will additionally train peer researchers from among communities most affected by historical violations, so that they can both contribute to knowledge production around the transition and support the participation of their communities in the process.

The launch of the Transitional Justice Barometer project in Tunisia in January 2015 was noted in local media: Tunisie: Naissance d'un baromètre de la Justice transitionelle.

Transitional Justice Barometer research reports:

Victim participation in Tunisia's transitional justice process (PDF , 4,216kb)

Research and transitional justice in Tunisia (PDF , 1,569kb)

Contrasting notions of history and collective memory in Tunisia (PDF , 2,495kb)

The victim zone and collective reparation in Tunisia (PDF , 1,344kb)

Refugee law

Refugee Law and Policy

The "refugee law and policy" theme of the Centre seeks to explore how the rights of refugees can be strengthened and enjoyed, not just in theory but also in practice. Our research on this theme is international, collaborative, and multidisciplinary. Although grounded in an understanding of the highly developed refugee laws and policies of North America and Europe, our research pays particular attention to jurisdictions and regions which have not traditionally been understood as having explicit legal provisions or policies concerning refugees, including in particular the Middle East and Asia. Projects under this theme are led by Martin Jones.

Refugees and the Arab Middle East: Protection in States Not Party to the Refugee Convention (REFARAB)

This 4-year project examining the situation of refugee protection in the Middle East is led by Maja Janmyr at University of Oslo with co-Investigators Martin Jones (York), Dallal Stevens (Warwick) and Ben Thomas White (Glasgow) and starts in summer 2019. The York led third pillar of the project will refugee legal aid and the rule of law in Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon and Tunisia/Morocco.

The law of asylum in the Middle East and Asia: Developing legal engagement at the frontiers of the international refugee regime

Principal Investigator: Martin Jones

Is someone a refugee if he or she has fled to a state that hasn't signed the Refugee Convention or recognised refugees in its domestic law? If this person isn't a refugee, does he or she have any rights? What protection is owed to him or her by the new state of residence? How can the law, lawyers and legal institutions respond to the vulnerability, needs and capacities of such individuals?

From Lebanon through to Malaysia, a majority of the world's refugees live in a broad, contiguous swath of states that have not signed up to the core international agreements concerning how refugees should be protected. In such locations, refugees are often treated as "outside of the law" and subject to discrimination, abuse and other serious human rights violations. The answers to the opening questions for these people are too often in the negative and the result can be catastrophic for refugees. Refugees in these locations suffer a range of mistreatment as result of being seen as outside of the law, including irregular status, discriminatory treatment from landlords and employers, sexual harassment and assault with impunity (including at the hands of state officials), arbitrary arrest and indefinite detention (often in conditions so severe as to put their life at risk), and corporal punishments such as canning. This project seeks to systematically explore some recent successes by local providers of legal aid to refugees in such situations and to determine whether these successes can form the basis for a new approach to refugee protection.

Working with four leading providers of legal aid to refugees in Egypt, India, Malaysia and Hong Kong, the project will evaluate the experiences of refugees, lawyers and legal aid organisations in using innovative legal arguments and frameworks to protect refugees. The project will support the mapping of the relevant local legal frameworks through doctrinal legal analysis, interviews and workshops with legal experts, and discussion with refugee community leaders. The project will provide funding to local lawyers to pursue legal advocacy for the rights of refugees drawing on a range of innovative sources of law, including other international treaties, local constitutional law, various local legislative provisions, local jurisprudence, and common-law principles. It will collect detailed stories about 120 of these legal encounters; these stories will be documented over time, using a range of material, and from multiple points of view. Forty of the stories will be turned in to multi-media, digital stories for further online discussion and advocacy.

The project will work closely with project partners. A series of international workshops will ensure that partners receive training and capacity building in the research methods of the project and fully participate in the analysis of the data produced by the project. The findings of the project will be shared with the scholarly and professional communities through sub-regional workshops hosted in each of the four countries under study and through the presentation of the findings at a range of international conferences and meetings.

The goal of the project is to support new refugee legal aid programming in the Global South, particularly in places where such programming has been overlooked because either or both the lack of the Refugee Convention and the absence of local refugee legislation. It aims to develop a better understanding of the process of litigation and factors that influence its success. As both the UN more generally and UNHCR more specifically move towards a renewed emphasis on the rule of law, the project will suggest pathways to protection that are consistent with this new emphasis and which pay attention to the expertise and agency of local legal and refugee communities.

For more information about this project, please contact Martin Jones (martin.jones@york.ac.uk).

Key facts:

  • Principal investigator: Martin Jones; Co-Investigators: Alice Nah and Juliana Mensah (University of York) and Kelley Loper (University of Hong Kong)
  • Funded by: Global Challenges programme of research through a jointly managed call by the ESRC and AHRC
  • Key project partners: Egyptian Foundation for Refugee Rights (Egypt); Ara Trust (India); North South Institute (Malaysia); and, Daly and Associates (Hong Kong).
  • Amount and duration: £ 299,448.80 for 24 months (November 2016 to October 2018)

Missing Migrants and Deaths at the EU’s Mediterranean Border: Humanitarian Needs and State Obligations

Principal Investigator: Simon Robins

The deaths of migrants and refugees seeking to enter the EU along its Mediterranean frontier constitute an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. A second crisis underlies these deaths: for every body found at the EU’s southern border, and for those lost at sea, there is a family awaiting news of their loved one. The missing are defined by the fact families have no news of a migrant’s fate. Missing migrants thus include those whose bodies are never found, and those whose bodies are found but never identified: for families the fate of all remains unknown. The response of the EU and its member states however continues to largely deny their responsibility to manage both bodies and data in ways that permit the identification of the dead and the rights of families to know. This project seeks to shed light on the policy vacuum that exists at national and EU levels by exploring the procedures and practices adopted by authorities in investigating, identifying, burying and repatriating the remains of migrants, and understanding the needs of families of missing migrants in countries of origin. This project represents one of the first efforts to systematically collect data in the most affected areas to comparatively explore – and critically engage with - current responses to migrant bodies. This work will build on existing studies on the Greek island of Lesbos and on the Italian island of Lampedusa. In parallel, the study will engage with families in areas affected by large-scale migration (Tunisia, and Syrian refugee communities) through a multi-sited ethnography that seeks to understand the needs of families of missing migrants. The project will draw insights from the management of the problem of the missing and disappeared in post-conflict settings to offer policy recommendations regarding effective practices of identification of human remains and policies to address the needs of families. It represents a collaboration between UK academics at the forefront of work on the issue of missing persons arising from both conflict and migration, and the leading inter-governmental organisation working on the issue, the International Organization for Migration (IOM).  

http://www.mediterraneanmissing.eu/ 

Policy brief: Addressing migrant bodies in the EU (PDF  , 774kb)

Writing refugee law in Asia and the Middle East

The states of Asia and the Middle East are frequently described as having rejected refugee law. However, in recent years, both state parties and non-state parties to the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees have introduced provisions into domestic law guaranteeing the rights of refugees. In Asia, Cambodia, China, South Korea, and Taiwan have introduced new laws protecting refugees. There are also ongoing efforts in Indonesia, Nepal, and Thailand to introduce refugee related legislation. In the Middle East, in the aftermath of the Arab Spring, there have been discussions around introducing domestic refugee legislation in Egypt, Libya, and Tunisia.  The above-noted efforts at “writing refugee law” have been thus far unexamined in the literature. This project explores the doctrinal, procedural, normative and ontological issues raised by these recent efforts to write refugee law.

Refugees, Rights, and Revolution‎‌

The Arab Spring has dramatically changed the legal and political reality of much of the Middle East, including Egypt. Although not discussed in the popular or academic scholarship to date, the Egyptian Revolution has resulted in significant hardship for refugees in Egypt, including by decreasing their livelihood opportunities, increasing the xenophobic violence to which they are subject, and otherwise making more difficult their access to protection.  In the light of the Revolution, legal service providers in Egypt have been forced to adopt new strategies for the provision of legal assistance. This project seeks to examine how the strategies of legal service providers have changed over the course of the Revolution and the implications of the changes in strategies for the underlying protection and enjoyment of rights by refugees in Egypt.

Human rights cities

Human Rights Indicators 

Principal Investigator: Paul Gready 

In April 2017, York became the UK's first Human Rights City. A local network called York: Human Rights City (YHRC), and CAHR, developed a new participatory approach to measuring human rights at a local level. Working with students at CAHR, our first step was to identify key priority rights for York by surveying those living and working in the city. Five clear priorities emerged: Non-Discrimination and Equality; Education; Health and Social Care; An Adequate Standard of Living; and Housing. For each priority right we then consulted with local organisations, users of services and service providers to select around two indicators per right e.g. hate crime for non-discrimination and equality. Annual reports will be published to record progress in York against these rights and indicators, and the report is designed to stimulate debate and action on human rights in the city - for example, it informs the agenda of a newly established Human Rights and Equalities Board. This approach represents a novel way of measuring human rights progress at a local level, which we continue to share with other cities interested in a Human Rights City status.

Human Rights Indicator Reports:

York Human Rights Indicator Baseline Report (2016) (PDF , 975kb)

York Human Rights 2nd Indicator Report (2017) (PDF , 3,340kb)

Related publications:

Global Urban Justice: The Rise of Human Rights Cities, Chapter 10

 

Global Health

Noma, Human Rights and Global Health

Principal Investigator: Ioana Cismas

Noma (cancrum oris) is a disease which affects young malnourished children living in extreme poverty conditions. This gangrenous disease starts in the mouth and spreads rapidly destroying the muscles and the bones of the face. If diagnosed at the earliest stages, noma can be easily treated with rehydration, nutritional intervention, antibiotics and mouth rinses. Yearly, 140,000 children in Africa, Asia and Latin America are affected by noma. The disease has a mortality rate of 90%.

Whilst it affects the most vulnerable in society, shares the main characteristics with other neglected tropical diseases, and has a higher burden of years lost due to premature mortality and disability, noma is currently not part of the World Health Organization (WHO) list of neglected tropical diseases.

Dr Ioana Cismas’ research seeks to contribute to the better prevention and treatment of noma and to addressing human rights violations associated with the disease through two strands of impact:

1) The acknowledgment of noma as a consequence and cause of socio-economic rights violations and substantive inequality

As legal advisor to a member of the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) Advisory Committee, Dr Cismas has drafted a series of studies on noma. In 2012, the Advisory Committee adopted the Study on severe malnutrition and childhood diseases with children affected by noma as an example and the thereto annexed soft law instrument, Human Rights Principles and Guidelines to improve the protection of children at at risk or affected by malnutrition, specifically at risk of or affected by noma. In its resolution of March 2012, the UNHRC, the main intergovernmental body within the United Nations system responsible for human rights promotion and protection, acknowledged the Study and ‘encourage[d] member states to implement’ the Human Rights Principles and Guidelines. Other human rights mechanisms have acted upon the recommendations entailed in those documents.

2) The inclusion of noma on the WHO list of Neglected Tropical Diseases

Dr Cismas’ work since 2012 contributes to the implementation of one the main recommendations entailed in Advisory Committee’s study: the inclusion of noma on the WHO list of neglected tropical disease. The formal recognition is expected to result - as was the case with other WHO neglected diseases - in greater institutional support at international level, increased funding from donors, and stronger governmental interest to prevent and treat the disease and to address associated human rights violations and discrimination.

Dr Cismas has contributed to coalition-building and research in support of the formal recognition of noma as a neglected disease. She is a member of the Task Force on Noma which includes representatives of Doctors Without Borders (MSF) and other non-governmental organizations specialising in the treatment of noma. She co-chairs the Workshop on Noma of the Geneva Health Forum 2018 which seeks to understand the difficulties encountered in gathering data on noma and proposes strategies and tools to address them.

Some of Dr Cismas’ activities are supported by an IAA ESRC responsive mode funding.