Professor Nia Bryant
Chair of Cell Biology

Profile

Career

 

2014 Chair of Cell Biology Department of Biology, University of York
2013 Professor of Molecular Cell Biology Institute of Molecular,
Cell and Systems Biology, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow
2010 - 2013  Reader Institute of Molecular,
Cell and Systems Biology, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow
2006 - 2010 Senior Lecturer, and Prize Fellow
Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine
(from 2004)
Division of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow
2003 - 2006 Lecturer Division of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow
2002 - 2003 Research Fellow       Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia  
1998 - 2002 Senior Research Officer       Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.  
1994 - 1998

Post Doctoral Fellow

Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR.  U.S.A.
1992 - 1994 Temporary Lecturer Department of Biochemistry, University of Edinburgh
1993

Ph.D. in Biochemistry

University of Edinburgh
1989 B.Sc. (Hons Biochemistry) Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh

Research

Overview

KEY RESEARCH INTERESTS AND DISCOVERIES

Two interrelated areas:

Regulation of SNARE-mediated membrane traffic
Understanding the regulation of membrane traffic is an important goal in cell biology as this process underlies many physiological processes.  We use a variety of systems, from yeast to mammalian cells, to study this.

Insulin-regulated trafficking of GLUT4
Insulin increasing the rate of glucose transport into fat and muscle by delivering the facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4 from intracellular stores to the cell surface.  This regulated membrane trafficking process is defective in the disease state of Type-2 diabetes.  We aim to define the molecular mechanisms that regulate GLUT4-trafficking in fat and muscle cells.

Shewan, A.M., McCann, R.K., Lamb, C.A., Stirrat, L., Kioumourtzoglou, D., Adamson, I.S., Verma, S., James, D.E. and Bryant, N.J. (2013) Endosomal sorting of GLUT4 and Gap1 is conserved between yeast and insulin-sensitive cells. J Cell Sci. 126, 1576-1582.

Coonrod, E.M., Graham, L.A., Carpp, L.N., Carr, T.M., Stirrat, L. Bowers, K, Bryant, N.J. and Stevens, T.H. (2013) Homotypic Vacuole Fusion in Yeast Requires Organelle Acidification and not the V- ATPase Membrane domain.  Dev. Cell. 27, 462-468.

Discoveries (last 18 months)

The molecular mechanisms that regulate membrane traffic are conserved through evolution, from yeast to humans.  My lab performed studies in yeast to demonstrate that mutations, in a gene called VPS45, identified in (human) patients suffering from a congenital form of neutropenia and primary myelofibrosis are directly responsible for defects in cell organisation.  This discovery is important as it can aid early diagnosis.

Professional activities

  • Journal editorial (and advisory) boards: The Biochemical Journal, Traffic, Frontiers in Endocrinology (specializing in Medical Molecular Biology and Biochemistry)
  • Fellow of the Society of Biology
  • Ambassador for The British Society of Cell Biology
  • Member of the Biochemical Society

Projects

Control of GLUT4 sorting by Syntaxin16 and mVps45, Funding body: Diabetes-UK

Ubiquitination as a transient modification in regulated protein trafficking, Funding body: MRC

How does tyrosine phosphorylation of SNARE proteins control GLUT4 vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane? Funding body: Diabetes-UK

Research group(s)

StatusNameProject
Senior Research Technician Dimitrios Kioumourtzoglou A combinatorial approach to enhance production of monoclonal antibodies
Postdoctoral Research Associate Agnieszka Urbanek A combinatorial approach to enhance production of monoclonal antibodies
Postdoctoral Research Associate David Mentlak A combinatorial approach to enhance production of monoclonal antibodies
PhD student Hannah Black Impact of tyrosine phosphorylation of Syntaxin4 and Munc18c on GLUT4 translocation

Professor Nia Bryant

Contact details

Prof. Nia Bryant
Department of Biology (B/J008)
University of York
Heslington
York
YO10 5DD

Tel: +44 (0)1904 328622