News archive

Cancer Research UK
York researcher awarded £1.2 million for new blood cancer research

Posted on Thursday 10 August 2017

A University of York scientist has been granted significant new funding from Cancer Research UK to carry out research into a specific kind of blood cancer.


Breast cancer now
York scientist to investigate how electrical charges help breast cancer spread

Posted on Thursday 27 July 2017

A leading scientist at the University of York is to investigate whether a change in the electrical voltage of breast cancer cells could be helping them to spread around the body.


Antibiotic resistance – gaining resistance is just the start

Posted on Thursday 27 July 2017

Scientists have discovered bacteria are able to “fine-tune” their resistance to antibiotics – raising the possibility of some superbugs being resistant to drugs which they have never even been in contact with.


York awarded major funding to tackle global challenges

Posted on Wednesday 26 July 2017

Researchers from across the University of York have been awarded major grants from the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) to tackle some of the most pressing issues around the world – including health care provision in Sub-Saharan Africa, reducing tobacco-related harm in Asia and combating neglected tropical diseases.


New book from York academic reveals how nature is fighting back

Posted on Wednesday 12 July 2017

An academic from the Department of Biology has written a new book that challenges us to look positively at the impact of humans on the natural world.


Skin plays significant role in spread of leishmaniasis

Posted on Tuesday 11 July 2017

Scientists at the University of York have discovered that parasites responsible for leishmaniasis - a globally occurring neglected tropical disease spread by sand flies – are mainly acquired from the skin rather than a person’s blood.


Climate change risk for rainfed rice cultivation

Posted on Wednesday 21 June 2017

New research at the University of York highlights the vulnerability of rainfed rice cultivation in India to climate change, which may put the livelihoods of low-income farmers at risk


New approach to unlock the genetic potential of plant cell wall

Posted on Monday 12 June 2017

Researchers from the University of York and the Quadram Institute have unlocked the genetic secrets of plant cell walls, which could help improve the quality of plant-based foods


Breakthrough in fight against neglected tropical disease

Posted on Friday 9 June 2017

Scientists say they have made a major breakthrough in the search for an effective vaccine for the neglected tropical disease leishmaniasis following the successful completion of a first in-human trial.


adonis blue butterfly thumb
1976 drought revealed as worst on record for British butterflies and moths

Posted on Wednesday 31 May 2017

Scientists at the University of York have revealed that the 1976 drought is the worst extreme event to affect butterflies and moths in the 50 years since detailed records began.


Scientists say they are a step closer to solving chronic bladder diseases

Posted on Thursday 16 March 2017

Scientists have begun to unlock the genetic code to understand how the lining of the bladder functions as a barrier to store urine - paving the way for possible new treatments for chronic bladder diseases such as interstitial cystitis and cancer.


cancer-southgate (x70)
Properties behind cancer curing molecule

Posted on Tuesday 28 February 2017

Scientists at the Universities of York and Huddersfield have improved understanding of a molecule that destroys cancerous tumours without harming healthy cell tissue.


Common cold (x70)
Cracking ‘Enigma code’ of common cold

Posted on Friday 24 February 2017

Scientists at the Universities of York, Leeds, and Helsinki say they are a step closer to cracking, what scientists have called, the 'Enigma Code' of the common cold virus.


Guppies (x70)
Predator threat boosts friendships among guppies

Posted on Friday 3 February 2017

Danger from predators causes animals to form stronger friendships, according to new research.


Bacterial cells (x70)
New antibiotic for gonorrhoea

Posted on Wednesday 4 January 2017

Scientists at the University of York have harnessed the therapeutic effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules to develop a new antibiotic which could be used to treat the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhoea.


Ash tree (x70)
Could disease 'tolerance' genes give new life to UK ash trees?

Posted on Tuesday 3 January 2017

Professor Ian Bancroft and Dr Andrea Harper have identified genetic markers for disease tolerance that suggest UK ash trees may have a fighting chance against a lethal fungal infection.


Coelites epiminthia (x70)
Movement of rainforest butterflies restricted by oil palm plantations

Posted on Tuesday 20 December 2016

Scientists at the University of York have found that oil palm plantations, which produce oil for commercial use in cooking, food products, and cosmetics, may act as a barrier to the movement of butterflies across tropical landscapes.


MRC logo
Global Challenges funding to tackle parasitic disease

Posted on Friday 16 December 2016

Professors Jeremy Mottram and Paul Kaye have been awarded two new grants to tackle the parasitic disease leishmaniasis, as part of the new £1.5bn Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF).


Plant explosives (x70)
Fighting contaminated land with help from the humble fruit fly

Posted on Wednesday 7 December 2016

Scientists have discovered that a gene found in the common fruit fly can be successfully expressed in a plant and used to detoxify land contaminated with TNT.


Plant leaf (x70)
Plant 'chemical factory' could produce variety of commercial products

Posted on Tuesday 6 December 2016

A 'chemical factory' on the surface of plant leaves could help produce more commercially useful products, researchers at the University of York have discovered.


Lung cancer (x70)
Scientists step closer to halting spread of lung cancer

Posted on Friday 25 November 2016

Scientists at the Universities of York and Texas have found that a component of cancer cells, which acts like a 'cellular post office', could be the key to preventing the spread of lung cancer to other parts of the body.


Rainforest
Maintaining connectivity in tropical agricultural landscapes

Posted on Wednesday 16 November 2016

Research directed by scientists at the University of York highlights how oil palm plantations may be barriers to the movement of rainforest species through agricultural landscapes, and highlights the importance of maintaining well connected areas of rainforest.


Norman M (x70)
Why prostate cancer cells develop resistance to treatment

Posted on Monday 24 October 2016

A new study at the University of York has shown that a standard hormone supplement, used to boost energy levels in prostate cancer patients following radiotherapy, could potentially increase the chances of the cancer returning.


Hermit crab
Effect of global warming on marine diversity

Posted on Tuesday 11 October 2016

Warming temperatures can reduce marine diversity but increase freshwater species – showing responses to climate change could be habitat dependent.


Maitland(x70)
Personalised medicines approach to prostate cancer

Posted on Tuesday 6 September 2016

Professor Norman Maitland is part of a new £2.6 million award scheme to further understanding of personalised medicine for prostate cancer.


Elephant
Poaching patrol: new ranger methods decrease illegal activities

Posted on Wednesday 17 August 2016

Ecologists from the University of York have tested a new method to detect and decrease wildlife poaching, using data to better predict where illegal activities occur in protected areas.


Killer whale
Drones to discover more about killer whales

Posted on Wednesday 10 August 2016

Drones will be used to discover more about the social lives of killer whales as part of new research which could help protect the species.


trypanosoma-brucei (x70)
New drugs hope to fight neglected tropical diseases

Posted on Tuesday 9 August 2016

Scientists say they are a step closer to providing effective treatments for three "neglected" diseases after making a chemical which can kill the parasites that cause the illnesses.


Super ant
Invasive garden ‘super ants’

Posted on Thursday 28 July 2016

Three new infestations of an invasive garden ant - known for building massive colonies of tens of thousands of insects - have been found in the UK this year, with researchers at the University of York warning their impact on biodiversity could be huge.


Bacteria (x70)
Viruses turbo-charge bacterial evolution

Posted on Tuesday 5 July 2016

Scientists at the University of York have found new evidence that tiny viruses called bacteriophages turbo-charge the evolution of bacteria that cause lung infections in Cystic Fibrosis patients.


Rare moth
Rare moth in severe decline

Posted on Tuesday 28 June 2016

Numbers of a rare species of moth - found only in York in England – have tumbled in recent years, a team including researchers from the University of York have discovered.


Jellicoe-Jutland
Playing the numbers game - why Jellicoe got his maths right at the Battle of Jutland

Posted on Monday 23 May 2016

Researchers have used mathematical modelling to re-analyse the Battle of Jutland and help shed new light on the biggest naval engagement of World War One.


Phage therapy
War against antibiotic resistance

Posted on Tuesday 26 April 2016

Soviet-era treatment could be the new weapon in the war against antibiotic resistance.


Ketamine
New effects of ketamine abuse uncovered

Posted on Monday 21 March 2016

Research conducted by scientists at the University of York has revealed how recreational ketamine abuse damages the bladder.


Antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance: it's a social thing

Posted on Tuesday 15 March 2016

Trace concentrations of antibiotic, such as those found in sewage outfalls, are enough to enable bacteria to keep antibiotic resistance, new research from the University of York has found. The concentrations are much lower than previously anticipated, and help to explain why antibiotic resistance is so persistent in the environment.


SAPN tiling
Using mathematics to improve human health

Posted on Wednesday 3 February 2016

Scientists at the Universities of York and Torino have used mathematics as a tool to provide precise details of the structure of protein nanoparticles, potentially making them more useful in vaccine design.


E8 world
Stepping beyond our 3D world

Posted on Tuesday 19 January 2016

Since the dawn of time, humans have endeavoured to unravel the laws governing the physical world around us. Over centuries we have tried to discover a Theory of Everything.


Ash tree
Fight against ash dieback

Posted on Wednesday 13 January 2016

Researchers at the University of York led a pioneering study which opens up a new front in the battle against a disease affecting ash trees across Europe.


Symbiosis
A far from perfect host

Posted on Monday 4 January 2016

Biologists at the universities of York and Exeter have published new research which shows that an ancient symbiosis is founded entirely on exploitation, not mutual benefit.


Plantation
Major new funding for industrial biotechnology

Posted on Tuesday 8 December 2015

Scientists at the University of York are to benefit from major Government funding for new industrial biotechnology and bioenergy research.


Rapeseed
High-value applications for rapeseed oil

Posted on Thursday 3 December 2015

A team of researchers, including biologists from the University of York, are a step closer to producing a biodegradable lubricant made from a new type of oilseed rape.


Fly TV (x70)
Enhanced detection of Parkinson's

Posted on Wednesday 25 November 2015

New research by biologists at the University of York could lead to improved methods of detection for early-onset Parkinson's Disease (PD).


Butterfly (x70)
Moth and butterfly species respond differently to climate change

Posted on Monday 2 November 2015

New research led by ecologists at the University of York shows that certain species of moths and butterflies are becoming more common, and others rarer, as species differ in how they respond to climate change.


Streptomyces colonies
Developing the tools to find new generation antibiotics

Posted on Friday 16 October 2015

Scientists at the University of York have taken an important step in the search to find new antibiotics that are effective against resistant bacteria.


Caterpillar (x70)
Re-thinking plant and insect diversity

Posted on Tuesday 13 October 2015

New research by biologists at the University of York shows that plant and insect diversity is more loosely linked than scientists previously believed.


Prostate (x70)
New treatment for prostate condition

Posted on Tuesday 13 October 2015

An unexpected discovery by scientists at the University of York could potentially pave the way for new treatments for benign enlargement of the prostate, a condition which affects more than 200 million men worldwide.


Breast cancer now
Potential new diagnosis and therapy for breast cancer

Posted on Monday 12 October 2015

Scientists at the University of York, using clinical specimens from charity Breast Cancer Now's Tissue Bank, have conducted new research into a specific sodium channel that indicates the presence of cancer cells and affects tumour growth rates.


Tomato thumb
Ecological route to plant disease control

Posted on Friday 25 September 2015

New research involving a scientist at the University of York has revealed a potential natural defence against invasive pathogens which damage food crops across the world.


Palm oil thumb
Biodiversity & carbon co-benefits to improve sustainable palm oil

Posted on Wednesday 23 September 2015

A new report by the Science-Policy Partnership Network, led by the University of York, provides important new information to conserve biodiversity and facilitate more sustainable palm oil production.


Ant (x70)
Ants on the march in non-native conifer forests

Posted on Tuesday 8 September 2015

A species of ant is thriving in habitats created by thousands of acres of coniferous forest planted in a UK National Park in the last 60 years, according to new research by scientists from the Department of Biology at the University of York and Forest Research, the Forestry Commission's research agency.


Superbug item
Secrets of a heat-loving microbe

Posted on Tuesday 8 September 2015

Scientists studying how a heat-loving microbe transfers its DNA from one generation to the next say it could further our understanding of an extraordinary superbug.


TNT item
Fighting explosives pollution with plants

Posted on Tuesday 8 September 2015

Biologists at the University of York have taken an important step in making it possible to clean millions of hectares of land contaminated by explosives.


Red-spotted newt
How newts can help osteoarthritis patients

Posted on Thursday 20 August 2015

Scientists at the University of York have taken a leaf out of Nature's book in an attempt to develop effective stem cell treatment for osteoarthritis, a condition which affects millions of people in the UK alone.


Parkinson's UK
Fast-track to clinical trials for new Parkinson's treatment

Posted on Monday 10 August 2015

Researchers at the University of York have played a key role in research which has found a potential new use for a drug used for decades to treat liver disease in treatment to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease.


Bog landscape
Birds, bugs and blanket bogs – an entire eco-system under threat

Posted on Friday 31 July 2015

Several rare upland bird species are being put at risk together with other ecosystem functions by the effects of climate change on the UK's blanket bogs, ecologists at the University of York have discovered.


Prostate cancer cell
Prostate cancer - why some tumours are resistant to radiotherapy

Posted on Friday 24 July 2015

Scientists believe they have identified how some tiny regulatory molecules in cells can make prostate cancers resistant to radiotherapy.


Poppy (x70)
Genetic discovery uncovers key tool for morphine production in poppies

Posted on Monday 29 June 2015

Scientists at the University of York and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Australia have made a key genetic discovery in poppies, paving the way for more effective painkillers.


White-headed vulture
Ecologists suggest African vultures heading towards extinction

Posted on Thursday 25 June 2015

An international team of researchers, including scientists from the University of York, the University of St Andrews and the Hawk Conservancy Trust, say African vultures are likely to qualify as 'Critically Endangered' under the International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) global threat criteria.


All change for bacterial outer membrane proteins

Posted on Thursday 11 June 2015

The discovery of how a group of bacteria rapidly adapts to changing growth conditions could have implications for future antibiotic development, according to research at the University of Oxford and the University of York.


Arthritis research logo
Stem cell discovery paves way for targeted treatment for osteoarthritis

Posted on Wednesday 10 June 2015

Scientists at the University of York have made a significant advance that could make cell-based treatments for arthritis less of a lottery.


Rhinanthus (Sue H)
'Vampire' plants can have positive impacts up the food chain

Posted on Friday 5 June 2015

New research has revealed that parasitic 'vampire' plants that attach onto and derive nutrients from another living plant may benefit the abundance and diversity of surrounding vegetation and animal life.


Conservation theory
Conservation theory gets mathematical treatment

Posted on Monday 1 June 2015

Theories used for the last four decades as a tool to guide the conservation of flora and fauna may have misinterpreted the biological reality, according to new research by mathematicians at the University of York.


Elephant
Mapping poaching threats: new method

Posted on Tuesday 26 May 2015

Ecologists from the University of York, together with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA), have developed a new method to better identify where poachers operate in protected areas.


Pathogens
Research plugs knowledge gap in parasitic disease's infection path

Posted on Tuesday 26 May 2015

Biologists at the University of York have played a key role in research that has increased the understanding of one of the world's deadliest diseases.


Millennium bridge York
Social structure 'helps birds avoid a collision course'

Posted on Tuesday 26 May 2015

The sight of skilful aerial manoeuvring by flocks of Greylag geese to avoid collisions with York's Millennium Bridge intrigued mathematical biologist Dr Jamie Wood.


Artemisia field
York's anti-malarial plant given Chinese approval

Posted on Monday 27 April 2015

A new hybrid plant used in anti-malarial drug production, developed by scientists at the Centre for Novel Agricultural Products (CNAP), is now registered as a new variety in China.


Autophagic cell
New treatment for prostate cancer

Posted on Monday 13 April 2015

Scientists at the University of York have discovered a potential new treatment for prostate cancer using low temperature plasmas (LTPs).


Arabidopsis droplet
Flowers bloom earlier in a warming climate

Posted on Tuesday 7 April 2015

Scientists at the University of York have discovered why the first buds of spring come increasingly earlier as the climate changes.


Sweaty back
Bacterial genetic pathway in body odour production

Posted on Tuesday 31 March 2015

For many, body odour is an unfortunate side effect of their daily lives.


Non native plants
Non-native plants are 'not a threat' to floral diversity

Posted on Tuesday 24 March 2015

New research by scientists at the University of York has shown that non-native plants are not a threat to floral diversity in Britain.


Frontotemporal dementia
Research identifies novel steps in Dementia progression

Posted on Monday 23 March 2015

Research by biologists at the University of York has identified new mechanisms potentially driving progression of an aggressive form of dementia.


Darwinian mystery
Protein the clue to solving a Darwinian mystery

Posted on Thursday 19 March 2015

Scientists at the University of York provided the key to solving the evolutionary puzzle surrounding what Charles Darwin called the 'strangest animals ever discovered'.


CII
Targeting one enzyme is the key to tackling two tropical diseases

Posted on Monday 16 March 2015

A way to combat malaria developed by scientists at Imperial College London and the University of York may also be effective against the deadly tropical disease leishmaniasis, new research has shown.


Plantation
York scientists question tropical protected areas' role under climate change

Posted on Monday 16 March 2015

New research led by University of York scientists highlights how poor connectivity of protected area (PA) networks in Southeast Asia may prevent lowland species from responding to climate change.


Killer whale
Old mothers know best: killer whale study sheds light on the evolution of menopause

Posted on Friday 6 March 2015

A new study led by scientists at the Universities of York and Exeter shows that female killer whales survive after menopause because they help their family members find food during hard times. This research provides insight into why women continue to live long after they can no longer have children.


Molecule NtrC
Bacteria 'hotwire their genes' to fix a faulty motor

Posted on Friday 27 February 2015

Researchers at the University of York are part of a team of scientists that has discovered how bacteria can restart their 'outboard motor' by hotwiring their own genes.


Allison Green
Dr Allison Green wins Diabetes UK award

Posted on Wednesday 11 February 2015

CII investigator, Dr E Allison Green, has been awarded £250,000 by Diabetes UK to investigate the contributions of thymic B cells in the development of Type 1 Diabetes.


DNA genome
Scientists discover viral 'Enigma machine'

Posted on Tuesday 10 February 2015

Researchers at the University of York are part of a team which has cracked a code that governs infections by a major group of viruses including the common cold and polio.


Lung metastasis
Researchers find potential anti-cancer use for anti-epilepsy drug

Posted on Tuesday 27 January 2015

Scientists have discovered that a drug used widely to combat epilepsy has the potential to reduce the growth and spread of breast cancer.


Bacteria
Understanding the personalities of bacteria

Posted on Wednesday 14 January 2015

Bacteria are as individual as people, according to new research by Professor Peter Young and his team in the Department of Biology. Bacteria are essential to health, agriculture and the environment, and new research tools are starting to shed more light on them.


Arabidopsis seeds
Mother knows best: how seeds recognise the seasons

Posted on Wednesday 17 December 2014

Scientists at the University of York have played a key role in new research into the way 'mother' plants use their memory of the seasons to teach their seeds the most advantageous time to germinate.


Richard III
Richard III – case closed after 529 years

Posted on Wednesday 3 December 2014

An international research team provides overwhelming evidence that the skeleton discovered under a car park in Leicester represents the remains of King Richard III, closing what is probably the UK's oldest forensic case.


Oilseed rape
Research sows the seeds of improved diet

Posted on Friday 28 November 2014

Scientists in the Centre for Novel Agricultural Products (CNAP) at the University of York are part of a major research project launched today to help provide improved crops for the future.


Chinese chickens
Researchers discover evidence of earliest domestic chickens

Posted on Tuesday 25 November 2014

An international research team has found the earliest evidence for chicken domestication to date.


Bone marrow
Researchers discover new target for blood cancer treatment

Posted on Tuesday 11 November 2014

Scientists at the University of York have identified a therapeutic target which could lead to the development of new treatments for specific blood cancers.


Orangutan
Research partnership is key to biodiversity conservation

Posted on Tuesday 4 November 2014

A new policy paper led by University of York scientists, in partnership with Proforest, aims to increase awareness among researchers of the High Conservation Value (HCV) approach to safeguarding ecosystems and species.


Insect diversification
York academics reveal new findings about insect diversification

Posted on Friday 3 October 2014

Biologists from the University of York have compiled two new datasets on insect evolution, revealing that metamorphosing insects diversify more quickly than other insects and are therefore the biggest contributors to the evolution of insect diversity.


Biofuel plant
Plant variants point the way to improved biofuel production

Posted on Wednesday 24 September 2014

Manufacturing biofuels from food crop by-products such as straw could be made quicker and cheaper thanks to a new study led by scientists at the University of York.


Cancer cells
New approach aims to silence cancer 'survival genes'

Posted on Tuesday 23 September 2014

Scientists at the University of York are working on a promising new approach for tackling colorectal cancer, the second most common cause of cancer-related death.


Neisseria meningitides
New insights into why adolescents carry meningitis-causing bacteria

Posted on Tuesday 5 August 2014

University of York scientists have shed new light on why teenagers and young adults are particularly susceptible to meningitis and septicaemia.


Flowers (Davis)
Mechanism of plants' ticking clock

Posted on Tuesday 29 July 2014

Scientists from the University of York are part of an international team of researchers who have made a significant step in discovering the genetic mechanisms that plants use to fight for light.


Southgate x70
Research points to new therapies for bladder cancer

Posted on Friday 11 July 2014

A University of York scientist has played a key role in research that could help to improve the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer, one of the most common cancers, particularly among men.


Royal Soc butterfly
Butterflies show how patterns evolve on the wing

Posted on Monday 7 July 2014

A handful of highly specific genetic "switches" can control a kaleidoscopic diversity of colours and wing patterns in butterflies, scientists will demonstrate at this year's Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition.


Cauliflower
York scientists' role in genome sequence lays foundation for better cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli

Posted on Friday 23 May 2014

Scientists at the University of York have contributed to a new study which represents a significant step forward in understanding the molecular processes which underpin the evolution of genomes in Brassica species.


Black swan
Bird invaders 'moving in' to UK's nature reserves

Posted on Wednesday 14 May 2014

A new study by scientists at the University of York and the RSPB Centre for Conservation Science has demonstrated that nature reserves and other areas specially protected for wildlife, as well as being vital for native species, are very important for helping European birds to expand their ranges into Britain naturally. The catch is that protected areas are also at increasing risk of invasion by species that have been introduced from further afield.


Medicago trunculata
Research shows how plant welfare is improved by fungi in soil

Posted on Monday 12 May 2014

A University of York biologist is part of an international team of scientists that has discovered how plants use fungi to help them to gather vital nutrients from the soil.


Aureus diagram
How bacteria exploit proteins to trigger potentially lethal infections

Posted on Tuesday 6 May 2014

New research by scientists at the University of York sheds light on how bacteria exploit human proteins during infections.


Arthritis research logo
York researchers to develop better therapies for osteoarthritis by rejuvenating old stem cells

Posted on Friday 25 April 2014

Researchers at the University of York are aiming to develop better therapies for the painful condition of osteoarthritis by rejuvenating old stem cells and using them to repair cartilage damage.


Tsetse fly
The Tsetse fly genome: unlocking the secrets of a blood-sucking insect

Posted on Friday 25 April 2014

Scientists at the University of York are part of an international team of researchers that has sequenced and analysed the genome of the tsetse fly, the blood-sucking insect that is the source of sleeping sickness which kills thousands of people every year.


Breast cancer logo
Breast cancer replicates brain development process

Posted on Thursday 24 April 2014

New research led by a scientist at the University of York reveals that a process that forms a key element in the development of the nervous system may also play a pivotal role in the spread of breast cancer.


Ash trees
Ash research reveals first genetic clues to fight dieback

Posted on Tuesday 18 March 2014

Scientists collaborating on ash dieback research can reveal the first genetic clues that could help them identify and breed trees tolerant to the disease.


Harbour seals
Species conservation poised to benefit from DNA advances

Posted on Tuesday 25 February 2014

A biologist at the University of York is part of an international team which has shown that advanced DNA sequencing technologies can be used to accurately measure the levels of inbreeding in wild animal populations.


Beaver
Researchers shed new light on the genetic history of the European beaver

Posted on Tuesday 18 February 2014

An international team of scientists has used detailed analysis of ancient and modern DNA to show that the distribution and lack of genetic diversity among modern European beavers is due largely to human hunting.


Prostate gland
Prostate development discovery could lead to new treatments

Posted on Tuesday 11 February 2014

Scientists at the University of York have discovered how the prostate gland develops for the first time, according to research published in Cell Press.


Hemp oil
Oil composition boost makes hemp a cooking contender

Posted on Monday 10 February 2014

Scientists at the University of York report the development of hemp plants with a dramatically increased content of oleic acid. The new oil profile results in an attractive cooking oil that is similar to olive oil in terms of fatty acid content having a much longer shelf life as well as greater heat tolerance and potentially more industrial applications.


Herdwick sheep
Scientists shine spotlight on Herdwicks’ origins

Posted on Thursday 30 January 2014

A new study highlights surprising differences between Herdwick sheep and their closest neighbouring UK upland breeds.


YCR logo
Methylation in prostate cancer

Posted on Friday 24 January 2014

New drugs being developed for the treatment of prostate cancer may not be targeting the root cause of the disease, according to research published today (Friday, 24 January 2014) in Cell Death & Differentiation.


Fly on thumb
Study reveals the role of sex in spread of deadly disease

Posted on Friday 17 January 2014

Research involving scientists at the University of York has provided important new information about transmission of human leishmaniasis, a group of infectious diseases which kills more than 100,000 people a year.


Palm oil fruits
Launch of new network to improve sustainable palm oil production

Posted on Monday 13 January 2014

Biologists from the University of York are part of a new knowledge exchange network to broaden the base of scientific data to inform policy on sustainable palm oil production in South-East Asia.


Adonis-Blue butterfly
Population stability ‘hope’ in species’ response to climate change

Posted on Tuesday 7 January 2014

Stable population trends are a prerequisite for species’ range expansion, according to new research led by scientists at the University of York.


Plant specimen (sml)
Biology to play key role in industry-academia networks

Posted on Friday 20 December 2013

The Biology Department at York is set to play a major role in three networks in industrial biotechnology and bioenergy designed to boost interaction between academia and industry.


Oilseed rape
Grant boost for high impact CNAP research

Posted on Thursday 12 December 2013

The Department of Biology’s Centre for Novel Agricultural Products has been awarded £10 million to fund research projects that have the potential to make a significant impact in both agriculture and the search for alternatives to fossil fuels.


YCR logo
Combination therapy could lead to reduction in prostate cancer recurrence

Posted on Wednesday 13 November 2013

Prostate cancer patients who receive radiotherapy could soon be treated more effectively, according to research published today in the British Journal of Cancer.


Chinese cattle
Researchers uncover origins of cattle farming in China

Posted on Friday 8 November 2013

An international team of researchers, co-led by scientists at the University of York and Yunnan Normal University, has produced the first multi-disciplinary evidence for management of cattle populations in northern China, around the same time cattle domestication took place in the Near East, over 10,000 years ago.


Threatened birds
Nature network hope for birds threatened by climate change

Posted on Monday 4 November 2013

New research involving a University of York academic provides strong evidence that internationally important British bird populations are being affected by climate change, which could threaten their long-term conservation status.


Fruit flies
Frontotemporal dementia insight from fruit flies

Posted on Monday 4 November 2013

The Yorkshire Post reports on work from the Sweeney Lab that provides insight into the mechanisms underlying frontotemporal dementia.


Arabidopsis
Researchers show how plants tell the time

Posted on Thursday 24 October 2013

Plants use sugars to tell the time of day, according to research involving a University of York scientist which is published in Nature today.


Killer whales
Killer whales may have menopause so ‘grandma can look after the kids’

Posted on Friday 18 October 2013

University of York researchers are playing a key role in a project investigating why killer whales continue to live long after they have stopped reproducing.


Embrace new invaders
York scientist urges us to ‘embrace new invaders’

Posted on Thursday 3 October 2013

A University of York scientist claims that invasive species such as Himalayan balsam and rhododendron should be welcomed to Britain rather than reviled. At least, they should not be hated simply because they are alien, he says.


Little changes – large effects

Posted on Monday 2 September 2013

Scientists at the University of York have discovered that very small chemical changes to dietary flavonoids cause very large effects when the plant natural products are tested for their impact on the human immune system.


potatoes-th
York scientists to test plants as natural pest controls

Posted on Thursday 8 August 2013

Scientists at the University of York are part of a £3 million research initiative announced by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and the Scottish Government to fund four projects aimed at improving food security for some of the world’s most important crops.


Wheat
UK's agricultural resilience strengthened by new initiative in York

Posted on Monday 22 July 2013

The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera) and the University of York have today announced a new joint venture: an Initiative in Agrifood Resilience. This announcement comes on the same day as the Government launches its new UK Agri-Technology Strategy, which sets out how investment will back the technologies of the future allowing our agricultural industries to grow and flourish.


Jane Hill
York professor to champion the role of women in science – from a soapbox

Posted on Friday 5 July 2013

A Professor of Ecology from the University of York will step on to a soapbox in London this week to highlight the role of women in science.


YCR logo
York scientists receive £160,000 award to investigate cancer-associated gene

Posted on Tuesday 2 July 2013

SCIENTISTS at the University of York have been awarded £160,000 by the charity Yorkshire Cancer Research to further investigate a gene that could play a key role in causing cancer.


savannah-birds
Protected areas provide African birds with stepping stones to survival

Posted on Monday 24 June 2013

The protected area network in Tanzania is playing a vital role in the survival of savannah bird species as they move west in response to climate and environmental changes, according to new research led by the University of York.


To germinate, or not to germinate, that is the question

Posted on Tuesday 11 June 2013

Scientists at the University of York have uncovered new insights into the way seeds use gene networks to control when they germinate in response to environmental signals.


How the wood-eating gribble could help turn waste into biofuel

Posted on Wednesday 5 June 2013

Scientists, led by Professor Simon McQueen-Mason and Professor Neil Bruce at the University of York, have discovered a new enzyme that could prove an important step in the quest to turn waste, such as paper, scrap wood and straw, into liquid fuel.


Standing up for Science

Posted on Monday 20 May 2013

Erica Kintz, postroctoral fellow in the Van der Woude lab in the CII, wrote an informative summary of the workshop "Standing up for Science" that she attended in November 2012, for the members journal of the Society of General Microbiology (Microbiology Today; February 2013).


Cizzle Biotech secures partnership with Fujirebio Diagnostics Incorporated to develop lung cancer test

Posted on Monday 13 May 2013

Cizzle Biotechnology Limited, a spin-out company from the University of York and leading clinical diagnostics company Fujirebio Diagnostics Incorporated (FDI) have today announced a co-development and licensing deal for a blood test for the detection of early stage lung cancers.


Teaching and Research Quality Rewarded

Posted on Wednesday 8 May 2013

The Vice-Chancellor's Awards for 2013 have recognised the high quality of a range of activities in Biology this year.


Science of the lambs: Heritage gene bank nurtures native sheep

Posted on Friday 3 May 2013

In early 2001, during the darkest days of the Foot and Mouth epidemic, Professor Dianna Bowles, former Director of the Centre for Novel Agricultural Products at the University of York and part-time sheep farmer, received an unexpected phone call from a farmer in Cumbria.


Innovative York students look for local business support

Posted on Friday 26 April 2013

A team of undergraduate Biology students at the University of York is developing a bacteria powered electrical battery as part of a global synthetic biology competition.


Scientists throw new light on DNA copying process

Posted on Thursday 18 April 2013

Research led by a scientist at the University of York has thrown new light on the way breakdowns in the DNA copying process inside cells can contribute to cancer and other diseases.


Protected wildlife areas are 'welcome mats' for UK's bird newcomers

Posted on Wednesday 17 April 2013

A new study by scientists at the University of York and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) shows that bird species which have colonised the UK in recent decades breed initially almost exclusively in nature reserves and other areas specially protected for wildlife.


Plants let chloroplasts know the time

Posted on Friday 15 March 2013

Plant cells communicate information about the time of day to their chloroplasts, the part of their cells that underpins all agricultural productivity on Earth, according to new research involving three University of York students which is published today in Science.


Anniversary double-take at YESI launch

Posted on Thursday 28 February 2013

YESI Launch event


Major investment in new microscope technologies

Posted on Wednesday 20 February 2013

A project to drive forward the understanding of key biological processes by developing new microscope technologies has received a £2m funding boost.


Research uncovers a potential link between Parkinson’s and visual problems

Posted on Monday 18 February 2013

Research uncovers a potential link between Parkinson’s and visual problems


New academic appointments in Plant Biology

Posted on Tuesday 12 February 2013

The Department of Biology will be welcoming new colleagues to its research focus in Plant Biology over the next few months.


Congratulations to Biology Graduates

Posted on Friday 25 January 2013

Biology Graduation was on Friday 25th January, 3.30pm


First ever estimate of arthropod diversity in a tropical forest

Posted on Friday 14 December 2012

Most multi-cellular species on Earth are arthropods living in tropical forests. Yet, given the difficulties involved in just counting them, we know very little about their exact numbers – even at the scale of a single forest.


Unlocking ancient rice secrets to overcome rainfall extremes

Posted on Wednesday 21 November 2012

Researchers from the UK, USA and India, led by scientists at the University of York, are embarking on a major four-year project which aims to develop new strains of rice to help to feed millions of people.


Brazil visit

Posted on Thursday 15 November 2012

Dr Betsy Pownall (Biology) and Dr Fabiola Martin (CII) were part of a delegation from the University of York that visited Brazil in September 2012.


Christmas in Antarctica

Posted on Wednesday 14 November 2012

A University of York researcher is looking forward to spending Christmas in Antarctica with the British Antarctic Survey.


Mathematics to reduce animal testing

Posted on Friday 9 November 2012

A York-based team, in collaboration with industrial partners, has secured three years of research funding from NC3Rs (National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research) to investigate how mathematics can be used to reduce our reliance on animal testing in evaluating the toxicological safety of new chemicals.


Brazilian trailblazers take up their places at York

Posted on Friday 9 November 2012

The University of York has welcomed its first students from Brazil under the Science without Borders scheme.


Painted Lady migration secrets unveiled

Posted on Monday 22 October 2012

One of the longest standing mysteries of migration has finally been solved after a team of scientists – including researchers from the University of York - discovered where the UK’s Painted Lady butterfly population goes each autumn.


Steps in the right direction for conservation

Posted on Thursday 18 October 2012

As the climate changes, conservationists are divided over the most effective way to preserve animal and plant diversity because they cannot simply preserve the status quo. Ensuring species can shift to track the climate to which they are suited is a complex problem, especially when there are competing demands on land use. A simple prediction is that more habitat would help species to shift, but it is not obvious what the best spatial locations for habitat would be.


New research moves York scientists closer to lung cancer blood test

Posted on Monday 15 October 2012

Early signs of lung cancer could be diagnosed using a simple blood test following a new discovery by scientists at the University of York.


DNA confirms genetically distinct lion population for Ethiopia

Posted on Thursday 11 October 2012

A team of international researchers has provided the first comprehensive DNA evidence that the Addis Ababa lion in Ethiopia is genetically unique and is urging immediate conservation action to preserve this vulnerable lion population.


'Mining' for metals using Nature's machines

Posted on Friday 21 September 2012

Scientists at the University of York are to lead an international team that will explore the use of plants to recover precious metals from mine tailings around the world.


New Marie Curie Network in York

Posted on Wednesday 19 September 2012

Professor Neil Bruce (CNAP, Biology)and Dr Gideon Grogan (YSBL, Chemistry) have been awarded a Marie Curie Network Project P4FIFTY - FP7 PEOPLE- ITN 2011-289217, Development of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes for the Chemical Manufacturing Industries.


Killer whales are "mummy's boys"

Posted on Friday 14 September 2012

An international team of scientists has found the answer to why female killer whales have the longest menopause of any non-human species - to care for their adult sons.


Ant behaviour tracked by tiny radio receivers in pioneering scientific study‌

Posted on Monday 10 September 2012

Researchers from the University of York are fitting one thousand northern hairy wood ants with tiny radio receivers in a world first experiment to find out how they communicate and travel between their complex nests.


Research reveals contrasting consequences of a warmer Earth

Posted on Friday 7 September 2012

A new study, by scientists from the Universities of York, Glasgow and Leeds, involving analysis of fossil and geological records going back 540 million years, suggests that biodiversity on Earth generally increases as the planet warms.


In the news - July and August 2012

Posted on Thursday 6 September 2012

Summary of Department of Biology news on July and August


York cancer scientists discover link between prostate cancer and vitamin A

Posted on Thursday 6 September 2012

Cancer scientists at the University of York have shown a link between prostate cancer and vitamin A for the first time.


Stepping stones to the north: 'citizen science' reveals that protected areas allow wildlife to spread in response to climate change

Posted on Tuesday 14 August 2012

A new study led by scientists at the University of York has shown how birds, butterflies, other insects and spiders have colonised nature reserves and areas protected for wildlife, as they move north in response to climate change and other environmental changes.


York Science and Innovation Grand Tour

Posted on Wednesday 8 August 2012

The Department of Biology is taking part in the Grand Tour, a visual celebration of York’s phenomenal achievements in science and innovation. The exhibits include:


Research Away Day July 2012

Posted on Wednesday 18 July 2012

Photos from the recent Research Away Day held on the 11th July at Hazlewood Castle, near Tadcaster.


Graduation 2012

Posted on Thursday 12 July 2012

Ceremony 6: Thursday 12 July, 3.30pm, Central Hall.


Academic promotion 2012

Posted on Thursday 12 July 2012

Many congratulations to Calvin Dytham who has been promoted to a Personal Chair from 1st October 2012.


New academic staff for York Biology

Posted on Friday 6 July 2012

Following a period of intense recruitment, Biology looks forward to welcoming a number of new academic staff over the next few months.


University Supervisor of the Year Award

Posted on Friday 6 July 2012

Congratulations to Adrian Mountford who has won one of the five coveted 'Supervisor of the Year' awards for 2012.


Business Secretary opens unique national facility to expand the use of plants by industry

Posted on Friday 6 July 2012

The Business Secretary Vince Cable opened the Biorenewables Development Centre (BDC)1 at the University of York on 5 July, 2012.


Maths experts question key ecological theory

Posted on Thursday 21 June 2012

Mathematicians at the University of York in the UK and the University of Canterbury in New Zealand say they have disproved a widely accepted theory underpinning the operation of complex networks of interactions in the natural world.


York ecologist receives conservation award

Posted on Thursday 21 June 2012

Professor Jane Hill has been presented with The Marsh Award for Conservation Biology by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) at a ceremony in London.


In the news - June 2012

Posted on Thursday 21 June 2012

Summary of Department of Biology news on May


Agents of haemorrhagic fevers often change host

Posted on Tuesday 19 June 2012

Biologists at the University of York have helped to discover that one of the world's most infectious classes of disease – viral haemorrhagic fevers – can spread much more easily than previously thought.



Genetic discovery unlocks biosynthesis of medicinal compound in poppy

Posted on Friday 1 June 2012

Scientists at the University of York and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Australia have discovered a complex gene cluster responsible for the synthesis of the medicinal compound noscapine.


In the News - May 2012

Posted on Tuesday 29 May 2012

Summary of Department of Biology news on May


Gourmet butterflies speed north

Posted on Thursday 24 May 2012

A new study led by scientists in the Department of Biology at the University of York has shown how a butterfly has changed its diet, and consequently has sped northwards in response to climate change.


Feed the world?

Posted on Tuesday 22 May 2012


Darwin Project wins best paper award

Posted on Tuesday 22 May 2012

A research paper studying the impacts of rain forest fragmentation on the genetic diversity of tropical ants was awarded ‘Best Paper’ under the category of ‘Journal of Science, Technology and Medicine 2011’ by the Malaysian Scholarly Publishing Council.


Nobel scientist delivers major public lecture at York

Posted on Thursday 17 May 2012

A world-leading scientist will talk about ribosomes – the large molecular machines that are crucial to life – at a major public lecture at the University of York on 25th May.


Royal Society honours York scientist

Posted on Monday 23 April 2012

A biologist at the University of York, who specialises in research into the impacts of human activities on wild animal species, has been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, one of the world's top scientific honours.


In the News - April 2012

Posted on Wednesday 11 April 2012

Summary of Department of Biology news on April


Research offers new clues to prevent infection in cardiac devices

Posted on Wednesday 11 April 2012

Bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, the 'superbug' behind MRSA, can be a major problem for patients who have a medical implant, such as a replacement heart valve or pacemaker.


In the News - March 2012

Posted on Wednesday 21 March 2012

Summary of Department of Biology news on March 2012


The Viking journey of mice and men

Posted on Tuesday 20 March 2012

New research carried out at the University of York and published in BMC Evolutionary Biology has used evolutionary techniques on modern day and ancestral mouse mitochondrial DNA to show that the timeline of mouse colonisation matches that of Viking invasion.


York scientists win research accolade

Posted on Friday 16 March 2012

A team of scientists has received a top award in recognition of research on bladder tissue engineering carried out at the Jack Birch Unit at the University of York.


Y Touring

Posted on Wednesday 14 March 2012

The YCR Cancer Research Unit hosts a play exploring the ethical and emotional implications of modern medicine


York researchers take their science to Parliament

Posted on Friday 9 March 2012

Two young scientists from the University of York are attending Parliament next week to present their science to a range of politicians and a panel of expert judges as part of SET for Britain.


First DNA segregation apparatus described for the third domain of life

Posted on Wednesday 7 March 2012

Scientists at the University of York have shed light on the molecular machine that archaea rely on to segregate their genome at cell division.


York Ant at the Royal Society

Posted on Wednesday 7 March 2012

Dr Antony Dodd gave an invited seminar at the Royal Society describing exciting new data concerning the circadian regulation of photosynthesis at a conference for Royal Society University Research Fellows.


Reconsidering the consequences of selective fisheries

Posted on Monday 5 March 2012

A new study by an international team of researchers is calling for a rethink on the most appropriate way to reduce commercial fishing’s impacts on ecosystems and fisheries productivity.


Hide, cheat, gang up: the survival tactics of microbes

Posted on Friday 2 March 2012

CII researcher Dr Marjan van der Woude is the guest interviewee on February's Society for General Microbiology podcast


In the News - February 2012

Posted on Wednesday 22 February 2012

February news in the Department


New insights into prehistoric human diet and agriculture

Posted on Wednesday 22 February 2012

Forensic-style scientific techniques are revealing new insights into the lives of our ancestors thousands of years ago.


BBC one to one interview - Bridget Kendall with Prof Dianna Bowles

Posted on Tuesday 14 February 2012

Bridget Kendall talks to plant biochemist Dianna Bowles about her joy for work and sheep.


In the News - January 2012

Posted on Thursday 2 February 2012

January news in the Department


Scientists reveal how cholera bacterium gains a foothold in the gut

Posted on Friday 27 January 2012

A team of biologists at the University of York has made an important advance in our understanding of the way cholera attacks the body. The discovery could help scientists target treatments for the globally significant intestinal disease which kills more than 100,000 people every year.


York wins share of £6 million investment in bioscience

Posted on Wednesday 25 January 2012

A successful collaboration between the White Rose universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York has attracted £6 million to create a joint Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) in mechanistic biology.


Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders (C2D2)

Posted on Monday 23 January 2012

CII scientists are collaborating with colleagues across a range of Departments in developing the new Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders (C2D2)


CII research is highlighted in new feature on Wellcome Trust website

Posted on Monday 23 January 2012

The pioneering work into combating neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) undertaken by the research group of Professor Deborah Smith, CII Professor of Molecular Parasitology and current Head of the Department of Biology at York, has been cited in a new feature on the Wellcome Trust's website.


CNAP / Brazil Bioenergy collaboration

Posted on Wednesday 18 January 2012

The first BBSRC-Fapesp funded project has been awarded to CNAP Professors Neil Bruce and Simon McQueen Mason at the University of York. The award supports work to identify new enzymes that can be used in the breakdown of lignin and lignocellulose for the production of liquid biofuels.


Biologists a step nearer to solving the Parkinson's conundrum

Posted on Tuesday 17 January 2012

Scientists at the University of York have made a significant step forward in isolating the cause of Parkinson's disease in younger adults.


Funded PhD programmes: STROMA Initial Training Network

Posted on Wednesday 21 December 2011


In the News - December 2011

Posted on Wednesday 21 December 2011

Biology Monthly News


Positive mid-term review for York Researchers

Posted on Wednesday 21 December 2011

Professor Simon McQueen-Mason and his team have just received very positive reports on their BBSRC Sustainable Bioenergy Centre (BSBEC) mid-term review.


In the News - November 2011

Posted on Monday 5 December 2011

Biology Monthly News


Results of a major investigation into the genetic makeup of the Leishmania parasite yield some significant surprises

Posted on Tuesday 15 November 2011

Researchers at the Centre for Immunology and Infection have contributed to a key new study of the genetic makeup of the Leishmania parasite that has important implications for drug development


Ancient DNA provides new insights into cave paintings of horses

Posted on Tuesday 8 November 2011

An international team of researchers has used ancient DNA to shed new light on the realism of horses depicted in prehistoric cave paintings.


Future survival of animals unknown in climate change age

Posted on Thursday 3 November 2011

The likelihood of animals surviving global warming will be more difficult to predict than previously thought based on the vastly different responses to climate change and human actions discovered in woolly mammoths and other large mammals living as far back as 50,000 years ago, new research has found.


New partnership to improve seed supplies of vital anti-malarial plant

Posted on Thursday 3 November 2011

At the Artemisinin Conference in Hanoi, the Centre for Novel Agricultural Products (CNAP), at the University of York, and East-West Seed announced a new partnership to ensure that high yielding seeds from improved varieties of Artemisia annua will rapidly be made available for global cultivation.


Researchers trace evolution of diversity in Hawaiian Honeycreepers

Posted on Friday 21 October 2011

An international team of scientists has determined the evolutionary family tree for one of the most strikingly diverse and endangered bird families in the world, the Hawaiian honeycreepers.


Climate Change and the Exodus of Species

Posted on Wednesday 12 October 2011


Researchers study ageing’s effect on the brain

Posted on Monday 10 October 2011

Research by biologists at the University of York and Hull York Medical School has revealed important new information about the way the brain is affected by age.


Tissue engineering centre looks at repairing joint damage

Posted on Tuesday 4 October 2011

Arthritis Research UK and the University of York are launching a £6 million experimental tissue engineering centre which aims to regenerate bone and cartilage by using patients’ own stem cells to repair the joint damage caused by osteoarthritis.


Prostate cancer prize for York scientist

Posted on Sunday 25 September 2011

A YORK scientist funded by Yorkshire Cancer Research has won a prestigious international award for his groundbreaking research into prostate cancer.


Domestication of horses leads to boring stallions, but interesting science!

Posted on Tuesday 23 August 2011

An international team of researchers led by Prof. Michi Hofreiter has used ancient DNA to produce compelling evidence that the lack of genetic diversity in modern stallions is the result of the domestication process.


Vice-Chancellor's Gold Award for Excellence 2011

Posted on Saturday 20 August 2011

Vice-Chancellor's Gold Award for Excellence 2011


Hot wildlife reaches new heights

Posted on Thursday 18 August 2011

New research by scientists in the Department of Biology at the University of York shows that species have responded to climate change up to three times faster than previously appreciated. These results are published in the latest issue of the leading scientific journal Science.


£2.15m for prostate cancer research

Posted on Friday 12 August 2011

Yorkshire Cancer Research has awarded £2.15m to Professor Norman Maitland to further his internationally award-winning progress into prostate cancer stem cell research.


York Biology in World Top 50

Posted on Friday 3 June 2011

Biology at York is one of only eight UK departments to feature in the Times Higher Education Top 50 World Ranking of Life Sciences Departments for 2010.


York against cancer in the Dragon Boat Challenge

Posted on Friday 3 June 2011

The nucleus of the team from the Jack Birch Unit at York University who will be paddling for York Against Cancer in the Dragon Boat Challenge on 10th July.


Ant research provides efficiency lesson

Posted on Thursday 26 May 2011


Staff Cycle challenge - Well Done Biology

Posted on Wednesday 20 April 2011

Thanks for taking part in the York Cycle Challenge. Together we have clocked up over 134,300 miles via 13,151 trips and saved over 20,200 kg of CO2.


3D lab experiments aid adult stem cell versatility

Posted on Thursday 31 March 2011

A type of adult stem cell is now proving itself more versatile for research and therapies thanks to revolutionary 3D experiments. These cells have already shown great promise for repairing damaged bone and cartilage but until now have been fairly limited in the types of cells they can form in the laboratory.


Genetic differences influence the structure of communities

Posted on Tuesday 29 March 2011

Scientists from the University of York are among a group of researchers investigating how genetic differences among individuals contribute to the way ecological communities form, interact and change over time.


Intervention offers 'best chance' to save species endangered by climate change

Posted on Friday 18 March 2011

A University of York scientist is proposing a radical programme of 'assisted colonisation' to save species endangered by climate change.


Using fruit flies to understand dementia

Posted on Wednesday 16 March 2011

Work in the Sweeney lab has been featured in this month's Alzheimer's Society magazine.


Major initiative to recruit international leaders

Posted on Friday 11 February 2011

The department of Biology wishes to recruit world leaders in Plant Biology, Molecular Biophysics, and Mammalian Cell Biology to complement and expand our existing strengths.


Research Fellows Event 20th & 21st April 2011

Posted on Thursday 3 February 2011

We are seeking applications to our Independent Research Fellows Recruitment Event on 20th and 21st April from researchers who hold or are planning on applying for Fellowships


Two elephant species in Africa

Posted on Wednesday 22 December 2010

York scientists have helped to demonstrate that the African elephant is in fact two different species. In a collaboration with US and German scientists, Prof. Michi Hofreiter has shows that the Savanna and Forest elephants diverged at least three million years ago.


York Biology remains one of the best departments in Europe

Posted on Tuesday 16 November 2010

The University of York has been included among 76 European universities deemed to be part of a Biology "Excellence Group" by the Centre for Higher Education Development (CHE) based on their results in research and internationalisation indicators.


Cancer cells revealed by "Virimaging"

Posted on Tuesday 2 November 2010

Viruses encoding fluorescent proteins can be used to light up cancer cells.


Extreme conservation strategies for climate change

Posted on Monday 1 November 2010

Professor Chris Thomas has suggested that it may become necessary for conservation agencies to start moving some species from where they currently live to other regions, to save them from the worst effects of climate change.


Eureka! Biologist one of three York scientists honoured

Posted on Friday 8 October 2010

Professor Ottoline Leyser is one of three University of York scientists named in the Eureka 100 ‘most important contemporary figures in British science’.


CNAP shortlisted for major award

Posted on Thursday 23 September 2010

The Centre for Novel Agricultural Products (CNAP) has been nominated in the International Collaboration of the Year category of the 2010 Times Higher Education Awards.