Harry Kenward
Senior Research Fellow: Palaeoentomology, Site Formation and Interpretation

Profile

Biography

Harry Kenward's first degree was in zoology from the University of London. He worked with Russell Coope and Peter Osborne in the Department of Geology at Birmingham University, being trained in Quaternary entomology by the former and turned toward archaeology by the latter. After a spell in the Natural History Museum curating the beetle collections, he moved to the York Archaeological Trust to work on insects from the deep anoxic waterlogged sites of York. This was followed in 1975 by a transfer to the former Environmental Archaeology Unit in the Department of Biology at York, where he later became Director, remaining till the Unit's disbandment. Research funding has come from NERC, English Heritage, local councils, property developers and the overheads generated by contract work. Harry retired at the end of 2009 and he is now an Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology, catching up on a long backlog of writing and, among other activities, trying to create a reference collection of beetles and bugs which will allow archaeoentomological work to continue in the University of York.

Publications

Full publications list

 

All of my publications and reports from 1975-2002 are included in the Environmental Archaeology Unit list available here.

 

2017

  • Bantock, T. and Kenward, H. (2017). Sciocoris homalotus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) – a species new to Britain. British Journal of Entomology and Natural History 30, 27-29 + plate.

2015

  • Hall, A. R. and Kenward, H. K. (2015). Sewers, cess pits and middens: a survey of the evidence for 2000 years of waste disposal in York, UK, pp. 99-119 in Mitchell, P. D. (ed.), Sanitation, Latrines and Intestinal Parasites in Past Populations (Studies in Early Medicine Series 3). Farnham: Ashgate.
  • Kenward, H. (2015). The insect remains [from Well 3.2], pp 357-367 in Halkon, P, Millett, M. and Woodhouse, H (eds.), Hayton, East Yorkshire: archaeological studies of the Iron Age and Roman landscapes. Yorkshire Archaeological Report 7.
  • Hall, A. R. and Kenward, H. K. (2015). Plant macrofossil and invertebrate remains from Pit 3.13, Enclosure Ditch 3.3, and Ditch 3.6, pp. 372-379 in Halkon, P, Millett, M. and Woodhouse, H (eds.), Hayton, East Yorkshire: archaeological studies of the Iron Age and Roman landscapes. Yorkshire Archaeological Report 7.

2014

  • Hall, A., Kenward, H., Rousseau, M. and Bain, A. (2014). The Environmental archaeology of Urban Landscapes, in Smith, C. (ed.) Encyclopaedia of Global Archaeology, 7544-7549. Berlin: Springer Science Publications.
  • King, G. A., Kenward, H., Schmidt, E. and Smith, D. (2014). Six-legged hitchhikers: an archaeobiogeographical account of the early dispersal of grain beetles. Journal of the North Atlantic No. 23: 1–18 01/2014 23:1-18.

2013

  • Kenward, H. K. (2013). [Contributions], pp. 29-31, 38-40, 51, 59-60, 75-77, 89, 105-107, 116-117, 139-141, 157-158, 172, 193-196, 208-209, 235, 251-256, Appendix 2, and Bibliography pp. 299-307 in Brunning, R., Somerset’s peatland archaeology. Managing and investigating a fragile resource. The results of the Monuments at Risk in Somerset Peatlands (MARISP) project. Oxford and Oakville: Oxbow Books.

2012

  • Campbell, G. and Kenward, H. (2012). Insect and plant remains, pp. 90-114 in Tipper, J. (ed.), Experimental archaeology and fire: the investigation of a burnt reconstruction at West Stow Anglo-Saxon village. East Anglian Archaeology 146.
  • Kenward, H. and Hall, A. (2012). Chapter 6. Dung and stable manure on waterlogged archaeological occupation sites: some ruminations on the evidence from plant and invertebrate remains, pp. 79-95 in Jones, R. (ed.) Manure Matters. Historical, Archaeological and Ethnographic Perspectives. Aldershot: Ashgate.
  • Kenward, H., Hall, A.and Jones, A. (2012). Turf roofs and urban archaeological build-up. Environmental Archaeology 17, 66-79.

2011

  • Carrott, J., Hall, A., Jaques, D., Johnstone, C., Kenward, H. and Rowland, S. (2011). Ch. 5. Plant and animal remains from BWH97, BWH98 and BWH00, pp. 140-70 in Lee, J. Excavations at Blanket Row, Hull, 1997-2003. East Riding Archaeologist 13.
  • Hall, A. and Kenward, H. (2011). Plant and invertebrate indicators of leather production: From fresh skin to leather offcuts, pp. 9-32 in Thomson, R. and Mould, Q. (eds), Leather Tanneries: The Archaeological Evidence. London: Archetype Books.
  • Kenward, H., Hall, A. Allison, E. and Carrott, J. (2011). Chapter 28. Environment, activity and living conditions at DPF: evidence from plant and invertebrate remains, pp. 497-547 in Lynn, C. J. and McDowell, J. A., The Excavation of a Raised Rath at Deer Park Farms, Glenarm, Co. Antrim. Northern Ireland Archaeological Monograph.
  • Smith, D. and Kenward, H. (2011). Roman grain pests in Britain: implication for grain supply and agricultural production. Britannia 42, 243-62. [DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X11000031]

2010

  • Kenward, H. K. and Whitehouse, N. J. (2010). Insects [The development of the beetle fauna of the British Isles], pp. 181-189 and Bibliography pp. 197-231 in O’Connor, T. and Sykes, N. (eds), Extinctions and invasions: A social history of British fauna. Oxford: Windgather Press.

 2009

  • Kenward, H. K. (2009). Insect remains, pp. 232-241 + references pp. 381-390 in Passmore, D. G. and Waddington, C., Managing archaeological landscapes in Northumberland. Till Tweed studies volume 1. Oxford and Oakville: Oxbow Books.
  • King, G. A., Gilbert, M. T. P., Willerslev, E., Collins, M. and Kenward, H. K. (2009). Recovery of DNA from archaeological insect remains: first results, problems and potential. Journal of Archaeological Science 36, 1179-1183.

2008

 

  • Jaques, D., Hall, A., Kenward, H. and Carrott, J. (2008). Plant, invertebrate and fish remains, pp. 381-406 + references pp. 421-437 in Garner, D. (ed.), Excavations at Chester 25 Bridge Street 2001. Two thousand years of urban life in microcosm (Archaeological Service Excavation and Survey Report No. 14). Chester: Chester City Council.

 

  • Kenward, H. and Hall, A. (2008). Urban organic archaeology: an irreplaceable palaeoecological archive at risk. World Archaeology 40, 584-596.
  • Kenward, H., Hall, A. and Matthiesen, H. (2008). Patterns of early stage taphonomy in plant and insect macrofossils: testing hypotheses in relation to post depositional mass decay of organic rich archaeological deposits, pp. 29-36 in Kars, H. and van Heeringen, R. M. (eds). Preserving archaeological remains in situ. Proceedings of the 3rd conference, 7-9 December 2006, Amsterdam. (Geoarchaeological and Bioarchaeological Studies 10). Amsterdam: Institute for Geo and Bioarchaeology, VU University Amsterdam.
  • Kenward, H., King, G. and Hall, A. (2008). Carbonised insects: rare, overlooked or destroyed by sample processing?, pp. 33-35 in Abstracts: Association for Environmental Archaeology, The consequences of fire. AEA 2008 annual conference, 12.-14. September 2008, Århus, Denmark. Højbjerg: Moesgård Museum.
  • Kenward, H. and Tipper, J. (2008). Insect invaders of reconstructed Anglo-Saxon houses at West Stow, Suffolk, England. Environmental Archaeology 13, 51-57.

2007

  • Barrett, J., Hall, A., Johnstone, C., Kenward, H., O'Connor, T. and Ashby, S. (2007). Interpreting the plant and animal remains from Viking-Age Kaupang, pp. 283-319 + references pp. 473-498 in Skre, D. (ed.), Kaupang in Skiringssal. Kaupang Excavation Project Publication Series 1 (Norske Oldfunn 22). Aarhus: Aarhus University Press. [See also detailed account and data: Barrett, J., Hall, A., Johnstone, C., Kenward, H., O'Connor, T. and Ashby, S. (2004). Plant and animal remains from Viking Age deposits at Kaupang, Norway. Reports from the Centre for Human Palaeoecology, University of York 2004/10, 144pp. Available here]
  • Coope, G. R. and Kenward, H. K. (2007). Evidence from coleopteran assemblages for a short but intense cold interlude during the latter part of the MIS11 Interglacial from Quinton, West Midlands, UK. Quaternary Science Reviews 26, 3276-3285.
  • Hall, A. and Kenward, H. (2007). Insects and plant macrofossils, pp. 41, 50-51, 104-109 and 126-130, Appendix 1 Details of macrofossil remains, pp. 186-210, and Bibliography, pp 215-235 in Van de Noort, Chapman, H. P. and Collis, J. R. (eds.), Sutton Common. The excavation of an Iron Age 'marsh fort'. CBA Research Report 154. York: Council for British Archaeology. [see also Technical report here and data here]
  • Kenward, H. (2007). Insects: sensitive indicators of climate change now as in the past. The Archaeologist 66, 42-43.
  • Kenward, H. and Hall, A. (2007). Biological remains trodden underfoot in excavation regime. British Archaeology May-June 2007, 51.

2006

  • Hall, A. R. and Kenward, H. K. (2006). Development-driven archaeology: bane or boon for bioarchaeology? Oxford Journal of Archaeology 25, 213-224.
  • Kenward, H. K. and Hall, A. R. (2006). Easily decayed organic remains in urban archaeological deposits: value, threats, research directions and conservation, pp. 183-198 in Brinkkemper, O., Deeben, J., van Doesburg, J., Hallewas, D. Theunissen, E. M. and Verlinde, A. D. (eds), Vakken in vlakken. Archeologische kennis in lagen. Nederlandse Archeologische Rapporten 32. Amersfoort.
  • Kenward, H. (2006). The visibility of past trees and woodland: testing the value of insect remains. Journal of Archaeological Science 33, 1368-1380.
  • Kenward, H. and Carrott, J. (2006). Insect species associations characterise past occupation sites. Journal of Archaeological Science 33, 1452-1473.

2005

  • Gearey, B. R., Hall, A. R., Kenward, H. K., Bunting, M. J., Lillie, M. C. and Carrott, J. (2005). Recent palaeoenvironmental evidence for the processing of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) in eastern England during the medieval period. Medieval Archaeology 49, 317-322.
  • Kenward, H. K. (2005). Honeybees (Apis mellifera Linnaeus) from archaeological deposits in Britain, pp. 97-107 in Brickley, M., Smith, D. and Smith, W. (eds.), Fertile Ground. Papers in Honour of Susan Limbrey (Symposia of the Association for Environmental Archaeology No. 22). Oxford: Oxbow Books.
  • Thomsen, T., Iversen, M., Enghoff, I. B., Jouttjärvi, A., Kenward, H., Moltsen, A. A. A. and Roepstorff, A. (2005). Arealet uden om værkstedsbygningen (The area around the workshop building), pp. 83-116 in In Iversen, M., Robinson, D., Hjermind, J. and Christensen, C. (eds.) Viborg Søndersø 1018-1030. Arkæologi og naturvidenskab i et værkstedsområde fra vikingetid. (Jysk Arkæologisk Selskabs Skrifter). Højbjerg: Viborg Stiftsmuseum/Jysk Arkæologisk Selskab.
  • Kenward, H., (2005). Insect and other invertebrate remains, pp. 215-237 in Iversen, M., Robinson, D., Hjermind, J. and Christensen, C. (eds.), Viborg Søndersø 1018-1030. Arkæologi og naturvidenskab i et værkstedsområde fra vikingetid. (Jysk Arkæologisk Selskabs Skrifter). Højbjerg: Viborg Stiftsmuseum/Jysk Arkæologisk Selskab.
  • Iversen, M., Robinson, D., Hjermind, J., Christensen, C., Daly, A., Enghoff, I. B., Fruergaard, J., Jouttijärvi, A., Kenward, H., Larsen, J. L., Malmros, C., Moltsen, A. S. A., Petersen, M., Rasmussen, K. L., Roepstorff, A. and Thomsen, T. (2005). Erfaringer of perspektiver fra et tværfagligt pilotprojekt (Experiences and perspectives from an interdisciplinary pilot project), pp. 503-528 in Iversen, M., Robinson, D., Hjermind, J. and Christensen, C. (eds.), Viborg Søndersø 1018-1030. Arkæologi og naturvidenskab i et værkstedsområde fra vikingetid. (Jysk Arkæologisk Selskabs Skrifter). Højbjerg: Viborg Stiftsmuseum/Jysk Arkæologisk Selskab.
  • Robinson, D., Kenward, H., Iversen, M., Hjermind, J., Christensen, C., Daly, A., Enghoff, I. B., Jouttijärvi, A., Larsen, J. L., Malmros, C., Moltsen, A. S. A., Petersen, M. and Roepstorff, A. (2005). Ressourcer (Resources), pp. 529-551 in Iversen, M., Robinson, D., Hjermind, J. and Christensen, C. (eds.), Viborg Søndersø 1018-1030. Arkæologi og naturvidenskab i et værkstedsområde fra vikingetid. (Jysk Arkæologisk Selskabs Skrifter). Højbjerg: Viborg Stiftsmuseum/Jysk Arkæologisk Selskab.

2004

  • Hall, A. R. and Kenward, H. K. (2004). Setting people in their environment: plant and animal remains from Anglo-Scandinavian York, pp. 372-426 + references 507-521 in Hall, R. A., Rollason, D. W., Blackburn, M., Parsons, D. N., Fellows-Jensen, G., Hall, A. R., Kenward, H. K., O'Connor, T. P., Tweddle, D., Mainman, A. J. and Rogers, N. S. H., Aspects of Anglo-Scandinavian York. The Archaeology of York 8 (4), pp. 293-521 + xiv + separate map. York: Council for British Archaeology and York Archaeological Trust.
  • Hall, R. A., Rollason, D. W., Blackburn, M., Parsons, D. N., Fellows-Jensen, G., Hall, A. R., Kenward, H. K., O'Connor, T. P., Tweddle, D., Mainman, A. J. and Rogers, N. S. H. (2004). Aspects of Anglo-Scandinavian York. The Archaeology of York 8 (4), pp. 293-521 + xiv + separate map. York: Council for British Archaeology and York Archaeological Trust.
  • Kenward, H. K. (2004). Do insect remains from historic-period archaeological occupation sites track climate change in Northern England? Environmental Archaeology 9, 47-59.
  • Kenward, H. and Hall, A. (2004). Actively decaying or just poorly preserved? Can we tell when plant and invertebrate remains in urban archaeological deposits decayed? pp. 4-10 in Nixon, T. (ed.), Preserving archaeological remains in situ? Proceedings of the 2nd [PARIS] conference 12-14th September 2001. London: Museum of London Archaeology Service.
  • Kenward, H. and Hall, A. (2004). Beyond the foundations: decay of organic remains in archaeological deposits associated with timber buildings at Bryggen, pp. 138-41 in Christensson, A., Paszkowski, Z., Spriggs, J. and Verhoef, L. (eds), Safeguarding historic waterfront sites. Szczecin: Stiftelsen Bryggen.
  • McCobb, L. M. E., Briggs, D. E. G., Hall, A. R. and Kenward, H. K. (2004). Preservation of invertebrates in 16th century cesspits at St Saviourgate, York. Archaeometry 46, 157-169.
  • Kenward, H. K., Hall, A. R. and McComish, J. M. (2004). Archaeological implications of plant and invertebrate remains from fills of a massive post-medieval cut at Low Fisher Gate, Doncaster, UK. Environmental Archaeology, 9, 61-74.
  • Kenward, H., Hughes, P. and Hall, A. (2004). Plant and invertebrate macrofossils, pp. 132-138, and bibliography pp. 177-184, in Heawood, R., Howard-Davis, C., Drury, D. and Krupa, M. (eds.), Old Abbey Farm, Risley. Building survey and excavation at a medieval moated site. Lancaster: Oxford Archaeology North.

2001-3

  • Hall, A. and Kenward, H. (2003). Can we identify biological indicator groups for craft, industry and other activities?, pp. 114 30 in Murphy, P. and Wiltshire, P. E. J. (eds.), The environmental archaeology of industry. Symposia of the Association for Environmental Archaeology 20. Oxford: Oxbow.
  • Hall, A. and Kenward, H. (2003). Evidence for tanning from plant and insect remains, pp. 3230-1 in Mould, Q., Carlisle, I. and Cameron, E., Craft, industry and everyday life: leather and leatherworking in Anglo-Scandinavian and medieval York. Archaeology of York 17 (16). York: York Archaeological Trust and Council for British Archaeology.
  • Hall, A. R., Kenward, H. K. and McComish, J. M. (2003). Pattern in thinly-distributed plant and invertebrate macrofossils revealed by extensive analysis of occupation deposits at Low Fisher Gate, Doncaster, U. K. Environmental Archaeology, 8, 129-144.
  • Davis, M., Hall, A., Kenward, H. and Oxley, J. (2002). Preservation of urban archaeological deposits: monitoring and characterisation of archaeological deposits at Marks ∓mp;mp; Spencer, 44-45 Parliament Street, York. Internet Archaeology 11, 30,968 words + 32 images. (http://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue11/oxley_toc.html)
  • Kenward, H. (2001). Pubic lice in Roman and medieval Britain. Trends in Parasitology 17, 167-168.
  • Carrott, J. and Kenward, H. (2001). Species associations among insect remains from urban archaeological deposits and their significance in reconstructing the past human environment. Journal of Archaeological Science 28, 887-905.

former Environmental Archaeology Unit: expertise, equipment, and raw data for many aspects of environmental research.

 

  • A list of publications and reports: 1975-2002

Centre for Human Palaeoecology:  after 2003 Harry Kenward and Allan Hall became members of the Department

 

  • A list of publications and reports: 2002-2010: The reports series puts on record preliminary results and data for work which may either not be published formally or for which publication is distant at the time of writing.

Research

Overview

My principal interest is in insect remains from archaeological deposits, and the information they can provide. I am, with Allan Hall, still investigating early stage taphonomy of plant and insect remains, for example using compost as an analogue for some kinds of occupation-site deposits in the past. This is part of a wider interest in assemblage and deposit formation and in-ground decay, which has included work on ‘background fauna’ in insect death assemblages and studies of preservation at sites such as the Somerset Levels, Star Carr and Sutton Common.

 

In the past few years I completed an investigation of insect remains from Viborg, Denmark, for Viborg Stiftsmuseum, as part of a major government-funded integrated research project into an 11th century site on the lakeside at Viborg. I have also worked on insects from Kaupang, Norway (part of a departmental interdisciplinary study), as well as numerous small British sites under developer funding. Several of my continuing research projects are concerned with modern analogues, including charred beetles and the invasion of reconstructed Anglo-Saxon houses by synanthropic insects.

 

A review of evidence from invertebrate remains from archaeological sites in the north of England, for English Heritage, appeared online in 2009. I am gradually bringing together chapters for a book giving an global perspective on insects in archaeology.

 

Research Interests:

 

  • Development of improved techniques for the interpretation of ancient insect assemblages, with emphasis on material from occupation sites.
  • Working towards a closer integration of concepts, principles and methods of insect palaeoecology and modern ecology.
  • Relating archaeological insect death assemblages to past local ecology; e.g. the visibility of woodland/trees and of pastoral agriculture; and relating death assemblages from archaeological sites to modern and ancient living communities.
  • Integrating the results of studies of archaeological insects more closely with those from other archaeological investigations, whether concerned with biology, pedology, sedimentology, artefacts or structural evidence, and with historical evidence.
  • Producing overviews of the implications of archaeological insect assemblages concerning past environments, human activity and human living conditions, often integrated with botanical evidence.
  • The use of insect species associations in characterising sites and in inter-site comparison; studies of urban land-use zonation.
  • Modelling and investigating deposit formation processes (especially where there is waterlogged preservation.
  • In-situ preservation and in-ground decay of the organic archaeological heritage, especially in towns.
  • Using insect remains to reconstruct past climate, especially in the past few millennia.

Teaching

Undergraduate

I am not formally involved in teaching but am happy to consider supervising undergraduate dissertation topics relevant to my research interests.

External activities

Memberships

  • Invited member of international projects in Norway and Denmark.
  • Associate Editor of the journal Environmental Archaeology
  • I continue to act as guest editor or referee for various journals.

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Contact details

Harry Kenward

Tel: (44) 1904 323901