Anna Woodhead

Postdoctoral Research Associate, Leverhulme Centre for Anthropocene Biodiversity

Ecosystem Service Changes

anna.woodhead@york.ac.uk

Biography

I completed a BSc. in Ecology, Evolution and Behaviour at Durham University, from where I did an MSc. in Conservation and Biodiversity at the University of Exeter. I then worked as a research assistant looking at the implications of change for the health and wellbeing of Cornish fishing communities. After that I worked as a Marine Policy Officer at RSPB Cymru, before doing a PhD on coral reef ecosystem services at Lancaster University. The PhD was funded by NERC and the Stockholm Resilience Centre and was conducted in partnership with the Seychelles Fishing Authority and Bangor School of Ocean Sciences.

Research

I’m an environmental social scientist interested in human-environment relationships and how these respond to change. My main area of work at the moment is looking at how ecosystem services are co-produced within social-ecological systems and the implications of environmental change for these different processes. I’m also interested in what that means for human wellbeing. These questions are relevant across systems, but I’m very interested in changes in the marine and coastal environment and the implications this has for coastal communities.

Publication Highlights

 

  • Dajka JC, Woodhead AJ, Norström AV, Graham NAJ, Riechers M & Nyström M (2020). Red and green loops help uncover missing feedbacks in a coral reef social–ecological system. People and Nature (2): 608-618; https://doi.org/10.1002/pan3.10092
  • Woodhead AJ, Hicks CC, Norström AV, Williams GJ & Graham NAJ (2019). Coral reef ecosystem services in the Anthropocene. Functional Ecology, 33 (6): 1023-1034; https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.13331
  • Woodhead AJ, Abernethy KE, Szaboova L & Turner RA (2018). Health in fishing communities: A global perspective. Fish and Fisheries, 19 (5): 839-852; https://doi.org/10.1111/faf.12295
  • Silk MJ, Crowley SL, Woodhead AJ & Nuno A (2017). Considering connections between Hollywood and biodiversity conservation. Conservation Biology, 32 (3), 597–606; https://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.13030

Funder 

Contact us

Leverhulme Centre for Anthropocene Biodiversity
lcab-enquiries@york.ac.uk
@AnthropoceneBio

Contact us

Leverhulme Centre for Anthropocene Biodiversity
lcab-enquiries@york.ac.uk
@AnthropoceneBio