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Britain's Oldest Brain images

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Brain material shows as dark folded matter at the top of the head in this computer-generated view into the skull. The lighter colours in the skull represent soil. Brain material shows as dark folded matter at the top of the head in this computer-generated view into the skull. The lighter colours in the skull represent soil.
Credit: York Archaeological Trust
 
Brain material showing as grey matter at the top of the head in this computer-generated scan through the skull. Dark areas are voids. Brain material showing as grey matter at the top of the head in this computer-generated scan through the skull. Dark areas are voids.
Credit: York Archaeological Trust
 
A representation of the skull generated from the CT scans taken at York Hospital. A representation of the skull generated from the CT scans taken at York Hospital.
Credit: York Archaeological Trust
 
Staff from York Archaeological Trust excavating  in the general area where the brain pit was located. Staff from York Archaeological Trust excavating in the general area where the brain pit was located. To the right and centre it shows the excavation of Iron Age ditches which defined part of the farming landscape. The pit containing the skull was just to the left of these ditches, at centre left of the picture.
Credit: York Archaeological Trust
 
Dr Sonia O'Connor, from the University of Bradford, examines the remains of the brain using an endoscope. Dr Sonia O’Connor, from the University of Bradford, examines the remains of the brain using an endoscope.
Credit: University of Bradford
 
Rachel Cubitt, from the York Archaeological Trust, examines the remains of the brain using an endoscope. Rachel Cubitt, from the York Archaeological Trust, examines the remains of the brain using an endoscope.
Credit: University of Bradford