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York plays host to South African jazz legend

Posted on 15 April 2013

South African Jazz will be in the spotlight at a free musical forum at the University of York this week.

Louis Moholo-Moholo. Photo by Aryan Kaganof

South African Jazz Cultures discussion day on Saturday, 20 April features legendary musicians, photographers, music industry professionals and academics.

Among the highlights of the event are two master drummers, Louis Moholo-Moholo (The Blue Notes, the Brotherhood of Breath, and Viva La Black) and Emmanuel Abdul-Rahim (Duke Ellington and the Latin Jazz Quintet), talking about their work with the late influential bassist Johnny Dyani.

There will be a screening of Aryan Kaganof's as yet unreleased film The Legacy. Award winning filmmaker Kaganof’s 'improvised edit response' to statements by three key South African jazz musicians - Tete Mbambisa, Louis Moholo-Moholo, and Zim Ngqawana - includes live music footage of Zim Ngqawana, Kyle Shepherd, and Tete Mbambisa.

South African Jazz Cultures will also feature previously unseen photographs and unheard live recordings, made by Ian Bruce Huntley, of key South African musicians in the mid to late 1960s including Chris McGregor, Louis Moholo-Moholo, Dudu Pukwana, Tete Mbambisa, Selwyn Lissack and Kippie Moeketsi.

The emphasis of the day will be on discussion and I'm delighted that we've been able to open up a space for exchange between academics, musicians, independent record labels, filmmakers and festival organisers

Dr Jonathan Eato

The event will include a round table discussion with Emmanuel Abdul-Rahim, Darius Brubeck (educator, pianist, son of Dave Brubeck), Hazel Miller (Ogun Records), Louis Moholo-Moholo, Brett Pyper (artistic director of the ABSA Klein Karoo National Arts Festival), and Matt Temple (Matsuli Records).

Organiser Dr Jonathan Eato, of the University of York’s Department of Music, said: “One thing that is not always realised is the key role that exiled South African musicians played in the development of jazz in the UK. As such it is a particular pleasure to welcome South African drummer Louis Moholo-Moholo to York to discuss his work with bassist Johnny Dyani. To have Bra Louis' insights counterpointed with those of percussionist Emmanuel Abdul-Rahim, who worked with Dyani in Scandinavia, is, I think, unique. The emphasis of the day will be on discussion and I'm delighted that we've been able to open up a space for exchange between academics, musicians, independent record labels, filmmakers and festival organisers.”

South African Jazz Cultures will be based in The Treehouse, in the Berrick Saul Building, and the Music Research Centre at the University of York.

Notes to editors:

Contact details

David Garner
Senior Press Officer

Tel: +44 (0)1904 322153

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