Centre for Modern Studies Postgraduate Forum

About the forum

About the forum

The Centre for Modern Studies Postgraduate Forum provides a platform for research students working within the modern period to present pieces of work and to share ideas with other students from across the humanities disciplines. Our aim is thus twofold: firstly, we offer opportunities for research students to develop and hone their presentational and discussion skills in an informal atmosphere amongst their peers, and secondly we hope to supplement the interdisciplinary research community based around the Humanities Research Centre. By focusing on the interdisciplinary role of the forum, we hope that a fruitful exchange of ideas and perspectives can be achieved in a manner that disciplinary segregation is simply unable to provide.

The seminar programme for each term will normally consist of five events per term, with the first opened by a keynote academic speaker. The subsequent events consist of two student presentations followed by group discussion. We try to pair speakers together who can present topics of relevance to one another, and thereby to spark a discussion which can draw from the content of both presentations.

If you would like to submit a paper for presentation at one of the forum events, please attach the text document to an email to cmods-pgforum@york.ac.uk. If you do not have a paper ready, but know that you would be interested in presenting something to the forum, or if you would like some experience at chairing a discussion, please feel free to contact us at the above email address.

You can also follow our events by joining our Facebook group.

 

Papers

Papers

This is a showcase of the work presented to the Centre for Modern Studies Postgraduate Forum. 

31/05/2012 Janelle Rodriques - Making a bad ting good: Hybridity and Authenticity in the BBC's Rastamouse children's series

31/05/2012 Michael J. Kelly - The Democratic Authenticity of Spontaneous Public Protest

31/05/2012 Katherine Rollo - The Posthuman Bildungsroman: The Clone as Authentic Subject

31/05/2012 Lotika Singha - Customised Authenticity in the Home: domestic experiences of first-generation, higher-educated, middle-class migrant Indian heterosexual couples

15/03/2012 Andy Munzer - American Spaces, American Stories

15/03/2012 Tim Lawrence - The Narrative of Economics, the Economics of Narrative: Realist Structures in The Wire

1/3/2012  Matthew Rounds - Why is it rational to experience emotions towards characters and situations we believe to be fictional

18/06/2011 Chiung-Ying Huang - The Confrontation between Subjectification and Objectification in Waterhouse's Lamia    

18/06/2011 David Matcham - Surveillance and the Death of God  

17/05/2011 Jay James May - These Mingle Joys of Art and Erudition: Pleasure in Materialist Film  

01/03/2011 Dominic Shaw - From Ontology to History

Annual symposium

Annual symposium

Nature at War

5th June 2014

Keynote: Dr James Purdon (Jesus College, Cambridge)

Taking place during the centenary of the First World War, 'Nature at War' is an interdisciplinary one-day symposium organised by the Postgraduate Forum of the Centre for Modern Studies at the University of York, exploring the dynamic between nature (broadly-conceived) and war from the mid-nineteenth to early twenty-first centuries.

Is the dynamic of nature and war essentially one of conflict, and if so, how can that conflict itself avoid being ‘unnatural’? How do ideas of naturalness and unnaturalness manifest themselves in war contexts? Can ‘war’ reconceptualise or reform ‘nature’, and can ‘war’ be found in ‘nature’ – and to what end?

Proposed papers of 20 minutes are welcomed from postgraduates across all humanities disciplines. Topics might include (but are certainly not limited to):

  • conceptualisations of humanity that involve internal conflict, with ideas of ‘naturalness’, transhumanism and technological warfare in constructions of the individual or a normalised conflicted society
  • imaginings of pastoral, bucolic, industrialised, chemically-altered or ‘unnatural’ landscapes as sites of struggle, including ideas of heritage, commemoration or symbolism of a warscape such as poppies and doves
  • ethics of pest control and use of animals in warfare and prototype testing
  • human, subhuman and extrahuman categories and their legality and morality
  • modern war requiems/elegies and experimental use of instruments/extended technique
  • forms of collectivity in conflict and ‘natural’ boundaries within identity politics during militarisation
  • ethics of conscription and requisition of body and property in total war

Please send an abstract of 300 words to cmods-pgforum@york.ac.uk with your name and institutional affiliation by 22nd April.

Previous annual symposia

2012-13 Advertising and Consumer Culture

2011-12 Authenticity

2010-11 Watching and Being Watched 

This term's seminars

Literary Ethics: Poetic Humour and Narrative Affect

The Treehouse, Wednesday 23rd April, 5.15pm