Literature

Autumn

Introduction to Modernism

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Literary Modernism is notoriously difficult to define as a movement. There are no definitive dates, but rather it is made up of texts that display a number of characteristics that make them Modernist. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept of Modernism through close reading of authors who were writing during the early part of the 20th century such as James Joyce, TS Eliot, Virginia Woolf, DH Lawrence, Ezra Pound and Katherine Mansfield.

John McKay PhD

  • Day: Monday
  • Start date: 06 October 2014 
  • Time: 7-9pm 
  • No. of weeks: 10
  • Full fee: £67.00

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JRR Tolkien: Medievalist and Mythmaker

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There is far more to The Lord of the Rings than many suppose: and yet more to JRR Tolkien than The Lord of The Rings. This day-course is for those who wish to explore the scope, scale, sources, affinities and significance of Tolkien’s philological and mythopoeic ‘Subcreation’ - his still under-appreciated ‘Mythology for England’ - somewhat further, including the corpus of posthumously-published epic poetry, not least the Norse-inspired Sigurd and Gudrún (2009), and The Fall of Arthur (2013). ‘Speak, Friend, and Enter’.

Rahul Gupta BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start date: 01 November 2014
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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An Introduction to Fairy Tales

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Fairy tales have been described as ‘good to think with’. From their beginnings, they were commentaries on the morals, customs and expectations of particular societies and formed the underpinnings of cultural institutions. This course will examine the function of fairy tales, their origins, purpose and value as social documents, as guides for living and warnings against trespass. In addition to the delight in enchantment we will also thrill to dark warnings and punishments and consider the implications of class, gender, Nature and the spiritual embedded in these tales. Not for the faint-hearted. No previous knowledge required.

Helen Bullock BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start date: 15 November 2014
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Spring

Not Just the Booker Prize 2014

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The Booker Prize is the most acclaimed literary award in the UK. But does the winner represent the best fiction title of the year? We will read, discuss and judge for ourselves the winners of six literary prizes and one of the bestselling fiction titles of 2014 in an attempt to answer this question. The only necessary qualification is a willingness to read and discuss the seven novels. Details of the set novels will be made available from October 2014 onwards.

Rob O’Connor BA MA CTLLS

  • Day: Monday
  • Start date: 19 January 2015
  • Time: 7-9pm 
  • No. of weeks: 8
  • Full fee: £53.50

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Around the Globe in Eight(ish) Plays

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Does Shakespeare have to be dull? William Shakespeare is the most enduring figure in the literature of the (Western) world, and one we are all confronted with - whether we like it or not - during our school years. By reading, watching and engaging with some of the Bard’s best work, including some of his poetry, this course aims to uncover some of the fascination and fun of the Elizabethan stage. Is Shakespeare for all time, or just for an afternoon?

Emily Bowles BA MA

  • Day: Tuesday
  • Start date: 20 January 2015
  • Time: 7-9pm 
  • No. of weeks: 8
  • Full fee: £53.50

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Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

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Virginia Woolf is one of the most important writers of the early 20th century and yet she is often thought of as a complex and difficult author. The aim of this course is to make her work more accessible and take the fear out of reading Woolf. This course will focus chiefly on her novels, but will also take account of her shorter fiction and non-fiction writing. It will also seek to contextualise her with contemporaries such as TS Eliot and Katherine Mansfield while exploring her influence on subsequent generations of writers. Suggested texts to study include Night and Day, Mrs Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, The Waves and A Room of One’s Own.

John McKay PhD

  • Day: Wednesday
  • Start date: 21 January 2015
  • Time: 7-9pm 
  • No. of weeks: 8
  • Full fee: £53.50

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The Dark Enchantment of Fairy Tales

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Join us as we delve into the history of fairy tales, from their origins as oral folk tales first collected in 17th century France, popularised by the Brothers Grimm in the 19th century, and made explicit by Angela Carter in the 1970s. This course will explore the surprisingly adult nature of the tales we tell our children, investigating latent themes such as sexuality, appetite, innocence and murder, as well as the place that fairy tales have in our society today.

Nicola Elliott BA MA PGCE

  • Day: Thursday
  • Start date: 22 January 2015
  • Time: 7-9pm 
  • No. of weeks: 6
  • Full fee: £40.50

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Introduction to Crime Fiction

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Crime fiction as a genre has become a literary must-read, the modern equivalent of morality tales. In addition to gripping narrative and addictive detectives, crime fiction offers consolation and reassurance that in a dangerous world, the guilty may still be unmasked and justice done. Much crime fiction functions as a social record of its time and the concerns and fate of ordinary people facing extraordinary circumstances. This course looks at crime fiction in historical context from Conan Doyle and Christie to Rankin, Atkinson and Nesbo. We’ll consider several well-known sleuths, the general appeal of murder and the future of crime fiction as a barometer of social change. No previous knowledge required.

Helen Bullock BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start date: 14 March 2015
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Summer

Hopeless Romantics

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‌Despite being drawn together under the umbrella of Romanticism, the poets of this period wrote about its key themes in very different ways. This course will explore and compare the words, attitudes and inspirations of three major Romantic poets - Byron, Shelley and Wordsworth - tackling the subject of love. Whether their inspiration is sex, politics or nature, they bring their own genius to putting the romance in Romanticism. There will be some discussion of Romanticism in historical context and the influence of each poet’s biography, but the course will focus on the poetry itself. No previous knowledge required.

Helen Bullock BA MA

  • Day: Monday
  • Start date: 20 April 2015
  • Time: 7-9pm 
  • No. of weeks: 8
  • Full fee: £53.50

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Sherlock Holmes Decathlon

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‌Ten weeks, ten short stories, ten literary investigations into the Great Detective and the master of mystery behind him. But which are the top ten stories? Is Conan Doyle’s own list accurate? Does the quality tail off in The Casebook? Beginning with Edgar Allan Poe’s influence on Doyle and concluding with his most illustrious successor, Agatha Christie, we will trace the career of Sherlock Holmes from his obscure origins in Gothic fiction to his current status as an international cultural icon.

Rafe McGregor BA MA

  • Day: Tuesday
  • Start date: 21 April 2015
  • Time: 7-9pm 
  • No. of weeks: 10
  • Full fee: £67.00

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Nineteenth Century Love and Madness

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‌What caused the Victorian fascination with - and fear of - madness? What did a lover look like in the 1890s, compared to Austen’s earlier aloof heroes? This course will look at representations of love and madness, from the wife in the attic to poetry written in an asylum, and bring together a range of writers, from the famous to the obscure, to find out if the Victorians were in fact darker and more daring than we give them credit for.

Emily Bowles BA MA

  • Day: Wednesday
  • Start date: 22 April 2015
  • Time: 7-9pm 
  • No. of weeks: 10
  • Full fee: £67.00

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Poetry for Peacefulness

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‌Fractious, fragmented, fed-up? Poetry, with its powerful rhythms, comforting and inspiring words, structured and familiar phrases and sympathy of feeling offers a soothing and stimulating respite from mental and emotional stress. The beauty of the language, the recognition and identification of ideas and responses and the cadence of the poetic voice can be a wonderful source of both enjoyment and relaxation. This course will look at a variety of poems from Donne to Duffy and discuss their value, both literary and as consoling pleasures. No previous knowledge required.

Helen Bullock BA MA

  • Day: Saturday
  • Start date: 6 June 2015
  • Time: 9.30am-4.30pm
  • No. of weeks: 1
  • Full fee: £35.00

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Term dates

  • Autumn Term
    29 September 2014 - 5 December 2014
  • Spring Term
    5 January 2015 - 13 March 2015
  • Summer Term
    13 April 2015 - 19 June 2015

Key

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