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Website open for 2017 registrations from August 2016

Please email che-admod@york.ac.uk to go on waiting list for registration notification

Decision Analytic Modelling for Economic Evaluation

Decision analytic modelling is widely used internationally as a means of estimating the costs, outcomes and cost-effectiveness of different interventions and programmes in health care and public health. In particular, these methods are often employed to assess the value of new pharmaceuticals as a basis for health systems to determine whether they should be funded.

Foundations course

Foundations Course

Fees

VAT is not payable. Transferring between courses is not possible.

  • Fees are fully inclusive of tuition
  • Lunch
  • Course dinner
  • Course materials 
  • Do not include accommodation
 Public/academic sector Commercial sector 
Foundations course  £720.00 £1130.00 

Places on all workshops are available to book right up until Friday 18 March 2017, although it is advisable to book early to avoid disappointment.

Overview

This is a two-day course providing an introduction to the principles and practice of decision modelling for economic evaluation in health.  This course is a collaboration between the University of Glasgow and the Centre for Health Economics at the University of York.

The course is aimed at health economists and those health professionals with experience of health economics who wish to develop skills and knowledge in decision analysis for purposes of cost effectiveness analysis.  It is designed for participants who are familiar with the basic principles of economic evaluation who wish to build, interpret and appraise decision models.  It is envisaged that participants will currently be undertaking economic evaluation within the pharmaceutical and medical device industries, consultancy, academia or the health service.

Courses comp lab

Teaching methods

A mixture of presentations from members of the Faculty, together with computer-based exercises using MS Excel on PCs provided.  All exercises will be supported by Faculty and a group of tutors.

Objectives

By the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • consider the role of decision modelling in economic evaluation to guide decision making
  • use the basic building blocks of decision analysis such as joint and conditional probabilities and expected values
  • implement the principles of conceptual modelling as a way of planning a model
  • understand the strengths and weaknesses of the decision tree model and build such a model in Excel
  • understand the strengths and weaknesses of the Markov model and build such a model in Excel
  • build a model for a generic diagnostic test and understand how to assess the value of diagnostic information
  • think critically about the structure of decision models in particular situations and apply these appropriately
  • implement key generic analytic steps in decision analysis such as evidence identification and basic synthesis, sensitivity analysis and reporting results

Alcuin college

Prerequisites

Participants would be expected to have attended a general course in economic evaluation such as York expert workshops offered by the University of York. The course with be based in a computer laboratory with each participant being given access to a computer with Microsoft Excel installed. A familiarity with Microsoft Excel is essential.

Outline programme

Please note that the exact programme is subject to change although the material covered will remain largely the same

Day one (10:00am start)

  • Module 1: Framing, planning and conceptualising models
    • Setting up decision problems
    • Designing an analysis
    • Conceptualising a model
    • Exercise
  • Module 2: Decision trees
    • Overview of decision trees
    • Structure and analysis
    • Exercise
  • Evening social event: Course dinner

Day two 

  • Module 3: Modelling diagnostics
    • Structuring diagnostic strategies
    • Value of diagnostic information
    • Exercise
  • Module 4: Markov modelling
    • Cohort Markov models
    • Structure and analysis
    • Exericise
  • Module 5: Further analytical steps
    • Sources of evidence
    • Synthesis of evidence
    • Uncertainty analysis
  • Course ends (5:00pm)

Advanced course

Advanced Course

This course is now full. For any information about further courses please contact che-admod@york.ac.uk 

Fees

VAT is not payable. Transferring between courses is not possible.

  • Fees are fully inclusive of tuition
  • Lunch
  • Course dinner
  • Course materials 
  • Do not include accommodation
                     Public/academic sector Commercial sector 
Advanced course      £1080.00  £1700.00

Places on all workshops are available to book right up until Friday 25 March 2016, although it is advisable to book early to avoid disappointment.

Overview

A three-day course focusing on Advanced Modelling Methods for Economic Evaluation.  This course is a collaboration between the University of Glasgow and the Centre for Health Economics at the University of York.

The course is aimed at health economists and those health professionals with experience of health economics who wish to learn about recent methodological developments in cost-effectiveness analysis. It is designed for participants who are familiar with basic decision modelling who wish to learn how to use more advanced modelling methods. It is particulary suitable for those who have attended our Introduction to Modelling Methods for Health Economic Evaluation.  It is envisaged that participants will currently be undertaking modelling for health economic evaluation within the pharmaceutical and medical device industries, consultancy, academia or the health service.

Objectives

By the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • model and populate a Markov model with time-dependent probabilities based on the results of parametric survival modelling
  • make a model probabilistic to reflect parameter uncertainty and to run Monte Carlo simulation
  • present the results of a probabilistic model using net monetary benefits and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves
  • assess the expected value of perfect information
  • understand how to incorporate various forms of meta-analysis into probabilistic decision models

Prerequisites

This is an advanced course focusing specifically on decision modelling. Participants would be expected to have attended a general advanced course in economic evaluation such as York summer workshops offered by the University of York, and to be familiar with foundations level decision anaysis (see Foundations course). The course with be based in a computer laboratory with each participant being given access to a computer with Microsoft Excel installed. Each module will involve computer work on exercises which will be built up over the three days. A familiarity with Microsoft Excel is essential.

Outline programme

Day one (10.00am start)

  • Introduction
  • Module 1: Developments in Markov modelling
    • Overview of Markov models
    • Advanced concepts in Markov models - time dependency and dealing with the Markov assumption
    • Building time dependency into Markov models using parametric survival modelling
    • Partitioned survival analysis for cost effectiveness modelling
    • Exercise
  • Evening social event: Drinks reception

Day two 

  • Module 2: Probabilistic modelling
    • 2nd order Monte Carlo
    • Dealing with distributions
    • Programming Excel
    • Using regression analysis to populate models
    • Exercise
  • Module 3: Presenting the results of probabilistic modelling
    • Presenting results from probabilistic models (net benefits, cost-effectiveness acceptability curves, sub-groups)
    • Exercise
  • Evening social event: Course dinner

Day three 

  • Module 4: Value of information analysis
    • Value of information methods
    • Development of EVPI
    • Introduction to EVSI
    • Exercise
  • Module 5: Evidence synthesis in probabilistic models
    • Metrics used in meta-analysis
    • Fixed and random effects models
    • Indirect and mixed treatment comparisons
    • Exercise
  • Course ends (4:00pm)

Dates

Course dates

York, England

  • Foundations course - Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 March 2017

  • Advanced course - Wednesday 29 - Friday 31 March 2017

Glasgow, Scotland

Please note that the Glasgow courses are run from The University of Glasgow - contact details: caroline.cecil@glasgow.ac.uk and here is a link to their website.

  • Foundations course - Monday 26 September - Tuesday 27 September 2016
  • Advanced course - Wednesday 28 September - Friday 30 September 2016 

Faculty

Faculty

In addition to the presenters below, tutors from CHE will be involved in all exercises to ensure that there will be approximately one faculty member for every four participants.

Andrew Briggs

Andrew Briggs, DPhil, Health Economics & Health Technology Assessment, Institute of Health & Wellbeing, University of Glasgow was appointed to the Lindsay Chair in Health Economics in June 2005. Andrew has an interest in all aspects of economic evaluation applied to health care, in particular the use of statistical methods for assessing cost and cost effectiveness, and the use of risk/prognostic modelling for making treatment decisions and guiding policy.  

Karl Claxton

Karl Claxton, DPhil, Professor of Economics in the Team for Economic Evaluation and Health Technology Assessment in the Centre for Health Economics, and in the Department of Economics, University of York. His research interests include evaluation on health care technologies, decision analysis, Bayesian decision theory and value of information analysis.

Liz Fenwick

Elisabeth Fenwick, PhD, is Director of Health Economics within the Health Economics Team at ICON plc.  Liz has worked in the field of economic evaluation and health technology assessment for over 16 years. Prior to her current position at ICON, Liz held academic positions at University of Glasgow and University of York, most recently as Professor of Health Economics leading the Decision Analytic Modelling & Simulation for Evaluation in heaLth (DAMSEL) team within the Health Economics and HTA group at the University of Glasgow. Liz has researched in a range of clinical areas including cardiology, cancer, public health and mental health. Liz has also contributed to methods in the field, in particular relating to decision analytic modelling and simulation methods, probabilistic decision analytic modelling and value of information analysis. Liz is an Associate Editor for Pharmacoeconomics and Medical Decision Making and is a member of the board for the Society for Medical Decision Making. She was also a member of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research joint taskforce on good research practices in modelling.

Stephen Palmer

Stephen Palmer, MSc, is a Professor and Deputy Director of the Team for Economic Evaluation and Health Technology Assessment at the Centre for Health Economics, University of York. He has worked in economic evaluation for over 15 years in areas including pharmaceuticals, cardiology, cancer, mental health, diagnostic and screening programmes and policy. He has extensive experience of health economic evaluation, regulatory and reimbursement processes. His principal areas of expertise relate to the methodology and application of decision-analytic modelling and Bayesian approaches to Health Technology Assessment. He has worked closely with policy makers and currently leads the programme of work at CHE for the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) and he is also a member of the NICE Decision Support Unit.  He has advised policy makers internationally including in the US and Canada. He is currently a member of the NICE Technology Appraisal Committee and the NIHR Research for Patient Benefit Programme. 

Mark Sculpher

Mark Sculpher, PhD, Professor and Director of the Team for Economic Evaluation and Health Technology Assessment, Centre for Health Economics, University of York. Mark has worked in the field of economic evaluation and health technology assessment for over 20 years. He has researched in a range of clinical areas and has also contributed to methods in the field, in particular relating to decision analytic modelling and techniques to handle uncertainty, heterogeneity and generalisability. He is a past member of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) Technology Appraisal Committee and currently sits on NICE’s Diagnostics Advisory Committee. He chaired NICE's 2004 Task Group on methods guidance for economic evaluation and advised the Methods Working Party for the 2008 update of this guidance. He was President of the International Society of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) (2011-12).

Registration

Registration

Before you register on these workshops please ensure you have secured the appropriate funding from your organisation, and (if applicable) that you allow yourself plenty of time to apply for any visas you may require to enter the UK, as you may experience some delay in getting these processed.

Please register via one of the following payment options:

Fees

VAT is not payable. Transferring between courses is not possible.

  • Fees are fully inclusive of tuition
  • Lunch
  • Course dinner
  • Course materials 
  • Do not include accommodation
 Public/academic sector Commercial sector 
Foundations course  £720.00  £1130.00
                     Public/academic sector Commercial sector 
Advanced course      £1080.00  £1700.00

Places on all workshops are available to book right up until Friday 25 March 2016, although it is advisable to book early to avoid disappointment.

Cancellations and alterations

A full refund of course fees (less 10% administrative charge) will be made for cancellations received in writing at least one month prior to the workshop. Substitutes can be made but please email new delegates details when known to che-admod@york.ac.ukCancellations made less than one month prior to the workshops are non-refundable/non-changeable.

In the unlikely event that, due to unforeseen circumstances, the course has to be cancelled by the University of York, our liability is limited to refund of workshop fees. We recommend delegates have adequate insurance cover to claim any travel or personal expenses.

Accommodation

Campus accommodation is organised by the University Conference Office. Information on how to do this will be included in the registration confirmation. Please note that these rooms are used by students when they are on campus. Aternatively, if you wish to book accommodation off-campus, there are many hotels and guest houses locally (Fulford and Heslington are the closest areas) and some of these hotels can be viewed on the following web-sites:

http://www.expedia.co.uk/Fulford-Hotels.d602274.Travel-Guide-Hotels

http://www.visityork.org/

York Courses:

  • Foundations Course
    27 and 28 March 2017
  • Advanced Course
    29 - 31 March 2017

Glasgow Courses:

  • Foundations Course
    26 and 27 September 2016
  • Advanced Course
    28 September - 
    30 September 2016

2016 CHE short courses in health economics and economic evaluation brochure (PDF  , 1,499kb)