York is the one of the leading centres for archaeological teaching in the UK

York is the one of the leading centres for archaeological teaching in the UK

Study a postgraduate degree in York, the heritage capital of Britain

Study a postgraduate degree in York, the heritage capital of Britain

Join a friendly department with a strong sense of community based in the heart of historic York

Join a friendly department with a strong sense of community based in the heart of historic York

The department has a strong international outlook, researching archaeology around the globe

The department has a strong international outlook, researching archaeology around the globe 

 A postgraduate degree from York is highly sought after in heritage and archaeological professions

A postgraduate degree from York is highly sought after in heritage and archaeological professions

The Department of Archaeology at the University of York is one of the best places for postgraduate study in Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. It is the second largest Archaeological teaching Centre in the UK and offers an unrivalled diversity of MSc and MA degree courses.

York is the heritage capital of Britain with probably the largest per capita population of Archaeologists, Conservators and Heritage professionals anywhere in the world. Based in the heart of the city, you are within easy access to important and iconic historic buildings dating from the Roman period and to the beautiful county of Yorkshire which is rich in archaeological treasures.

Postgraduate Study

Fees and Funding

Part-time Study

FAQs

How to Apply

PG Brochure (218)

Contact us for a copy of our brochure or Archaeology Postgraduate Brochure (PDF  , 3,498kb)

 To find out more about studying for a MSc, MA or PhD please contact us stating which course and subject area you are interested in or contact the relevant course director. We look forward to hearing from you.

 

Why York?

News

12-05-2015 Ashby Viking Age thumbnail
Scandinavian trade ‘triggered’ the Viking Age

Posted on Tuesday 12 May 2015

Co-authored work by York and Danish researchers suggests an earlier, less violent dawn to the Viking Age


20-04-2015 Spikins Empathy thumbnail
Ancient cave art paints a picture of human empathy

Posted on Monday 20 April 2015

Prehistoric life wasn’t all hunting, killing and eating, says Dr Penny Spikins